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Dune Road: A Novel ebook

by Jane Green


Jane Green writes with such honesty and zing. Sophie Kinsella, New York Times bestselling author. The characters that populate Dune Road: A Novel were interesting, like real people who do annoying things to one another, while keeping potentially dangerous secrets.

Jane Green writes with such honesty and zing. Her compelling tale reflects an understanding of contemporary women that’s acute and compassionate, served up with style. The kind of novel you’ll gobble up at a single sitting. We see their vulnerabilities, their flaws, and watch how they deal with financial set-backs in the worst economic downturn in recent history.

The characters that populate Dune Road: A Novel were interesting, like real people who do annoying things to one another, while keeping potentially dangerous secrets

Ships from and sold by Fort Hill International.

Dune road : a novel, Jane Green. p. cm. eISBN : 978-1-101-06129-9.

If the financial crisis hit Desperate Housewives' Wisteria Lane, the result would be Green's (The Beach House) latest novel  . A former journalist in the UK and a graduate of the International Culinary Center in New York, Jane Green has written many novels (including Jemima J, The Beach House, Falling, and The Sunshine Sisters), most of which have been New York Times bestsellers, and one cookbook, Good Taste.

The new Jane Green writes stilted, hackneyed, predictable women's fiction novels with two-dimensional characters and ridiculous motivations. It's as if she is writing by numbers. She appears to pick character names out of a hat, with the result that several Once upon a time, Jane Green wrote light, breezy, fun books about young British women coming of age. Those were stellar chick lit novels, best of the genre. I miss that Jane Green.

A warm bath of a novel that draws you i. reen’s sympathetic portrayal. esonate. Warm, witty, sharp and insightful.

From the New York Times bestselling author of Falling and The Sunshine Sisters comes a timely novel about the challenges of starting over. In the Gold Coast town of Highfield, Connecticut, recent divorcée Kit Hargrove has joyfully exchanged the requisite diamond studs and Persian rugs of a Wall Street Widow for her true dream home: a clapboard Cape with sea green shutters and sprawling impatiens. A warm bath of a novel that draws you i. Jane Green writes with such honesty and zing.

Written by Jane Green. Narrated by Cassandra Campbell. I continue to read Jane Green’s books, thinking they have to get better. So weird, as feel she always sets up the books for a great novel and likeable characters

Written by Jane Green. A sparkling new novel from the New York Times- bestselling author of The Beach House. So weird, as feel she always sets up the books for a great novel and likeable characters. However, she continues to talk over and over about feelings from the characters as almost overboard, and then forgets the actual story? There is never much of a story or substance, it is more about what this one thinks and that one with lots of drama.

From the New York Times bestselling author of Falling and The Sunshine Sisters comes a timely novel about the challenges of starting over.In the Gold Coast town of Highfield, Connecticut, recent divorcée Kit Hargrove has joyfully exchanged the requisite diamond studs and Persian rugs of a “Wall Street Widow” for her true dream home: a clapboard Cape with sea green shutters and sprawling impatiens. Her kids are content, her ex cooperative, and each morning she wakes up to her dream job assisting novelist Robert McClore.But when a figure from the past arrives just as the shifting financial market turns Highfield upside down, Kit is forced to realize that her blissfully constructed life and blossoming new romance aren’t as foolproof as she thought...
Unh
Kit Hargrove is starting over. After her divorce from Adam, a Wall Street executive, she sells the big fancy house in Highfield, Connecticut, and settles comfortably into a smaller Cape Cod in another part of town. Her two children, Tory, 13, and Buckley, 8, show some signs of the stress of transition, but other than the usual issues, they seem to be doing fine.

She hasn’t downsized to poverty…she is just not in the same social set. But Kit never enjoyed that scene anyway. She takes a job as an assistant to a best-selling author, Robert McClore, and finds a new mother figure in her next-door neighbor Edie. She still regularly socializes with her best friend Charlie, even though Charlie is still married and living in the big house.

Then along comes Tracy, and this is where things start getting interesting. Tracy seems like a con artist to me, and she is making some very questionable moves. What will we learn about her?

A new man suddenly pops up…compliments of Tracy pointing him out. Is there more to this story?

What appeared to be just the usual novel about new beginnings starts to take on a different premise, as more and more unexpected events are triggered, and Kit’s new life begins unfolding in unpredictable ways.

How do secrets from Kit’s mother’s past suddenly reveal themselves and begin to change everything Kit thought she knew about her and about her own life?

The characters that populate Dune Road: A Novel were interesting, like real people who do annoying things to one another, while keeping potentially dangerous secrets. We see their vulnerabilities, their flaws, and watch how they deal with financial set-backs in the worst economic downturn in recent history. They are forced to question their attitudes, beliefs, and plans, and they must struggle to redefine who they are. The conclusion left me with a feeling of positivity. 4.5 stars.
black coffe
After reading Jane Green's books for many years, and finding the last two or three to be disappointing, I picked up Dune Road hoping that she had somehow managed to find a trace of the flair she displayed in her earliest offerings, such as the delightful Jemima J: A Novel About Ugly Ducklings and Swans and thoughtful Bookends: A Novel. Instead of a lively and punchy chick lit work, however, I found myself reading the most banal novel full of the most irritating and dithering female characters it has ever been my misfortune to encounter in a novel with a contemporary setting; I wanted to pick most of them up and shake them until their hair was less than perfect and their gleaming teeth rattled at least slightly.

Kit is divorced from her Wall Street banker husband because, it seems, she couldn't find a better way to stop herself from being transformed into the kind of trophy wife he wanted. (It's no secret, from the earliest pages, that he still hankers after her and he's really her soul mate.) Her closest friend, meanwhile, after happily becoming a consumer goddess, is angry at her husband for mismanaging their finances and allowing her to become that woman. Leaving aside the issue of whether either woman is interesting or appealing enough to identify with, there's the bigger one of whether they are realistic. In this reader's opinion, both are cardboard cutout characters and Green's half-hearted efforts to transform their lifestyles into lives by whipping up such drama as a mother's conflict with her daughter over borrowed clothes are just absurd and, ultimately, dull as ditchwater.

There is a plot and an underlying theme of sorts to this, but both are a bit absurd in both nature and execution. The theme -- how well do we really know the people we have in our lives or who we encounter -- is at the heart of the plot, which revolves around the somewhat mysterious Tracy, owner of the yoga center that both Kit and Charlie, her friend, attend. (There's also a subplot involving a mysterious sister of one of the characters, who may or may not be what she seems, and a suitor for one of them, ditto.) Through in a reclusive thriller writer, apparently tormented by the death of his wife 30 years earlier; a warm, wise and witty elderly neighbor and surrogate grandmother living next door to Kit, etc. etc -- and you still have a novel about not much in particular, going nowhere in particular. The plot -- which doesn't get going until halfway through the book -- has all twists and turns telegraphed well in advance. It was only sheer stubborness that got me to the final page.

There are authors who have written wonderful domestic novels, from Jane Austen onward. Those stories rely as much on compelling character portrayals more than drama in the plot. Chick lit, I'd argue, is characterized more by predictable character types set in plot dilemmas that while recognizable, never become so predictable that the reader can see what will happen next. This book doesn't succeed on either front. Jane Green is no Jane Austen; she can't write about character development, even if her characters developed. (They don't; they meander and drift and ponder, endlessly.) The writing is as tedious and meandering as her characters' musings; such plot as exists isn't the kind that will keep you turning the pages to see what happens. It's a story about characters who just seem to dither, to whom things happen. When I compare that to her previous novels, whose characters acted, reflected and changed their own lives, this is deeply disappointing.

Coming from an author whose work I'd never read before, this would earn 2 stars; because Green can do and has done far better when she's put her mind to it, I'm giving this 2.5 stars and even rounding it up. But I'd suggest it only as a beach read -- and then only if you've borrowed it from a library.
Yayrel
This is not the best Jane Green book I've read -- like at least three others better -- and I will still read other of her books, for I do like her style. But this was not to my taste. Yes, it had the main character/s, each dealing with their issues, but some of the subplots were a bit far-fetched and conclusions too neat.

I am not one to review the whole book -- readers of reviews can find the story elsewhere -- and while I didn't have too much trouble with the story itself, not thrilled with much of the details of the characters.
Shadowredeemer
I generally very much like Jane Green's books, mostly because the characters always seem so genuine and their problems are very relatable. Kit is single mom working for a famous-and famously reclusive-novelist. She becomes immersed in intrigue when she stubmles on a secret her boss has kept hidden for years, which also becomes intertwined with twists and turns in her own personal life. I just found the plot of this book too much of a stretch. There was not one, not two, but three different unrealistic plot lines going on during this book and I just didn't buy it. There were moments when I really related to certain characters, particularly Kit, but they were overshadowed by the almost soap opera-esque plot lines. Not my favorite book by Jane Green by a long shot.
Dune Road: A Novel ebook
Author:
Jane Green
Category:
Genre Fiction
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1440 kb
FB2 size:
1150 kb
DJVU size:
1108 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Berkley; Reprint edition (May 25, 2010)
Pages:
352 pages
Rating:
4.1
Other formats:
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