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Every Third Thought: A Novel in Five Seasons ebook

by John Barth


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Home John Barth Every Third Thought: A Novel in Five Seasons. Every third thought a n. .Not us Newett/Todds; nor did we make that happy discovery by doing a Captain John Smith in reverse and sailing from Chesapeake to Channel, New World to Old. Instead, we drove Mandy’s high-mileage, pesto-green Honda Civic through intermittent n showers from our Stratford (. from the rented riverside condo in which we’d been making shift since Heron Bay Estates’ doomsday) up I-95 past Wilmington to Philadelphia Airport’s long-term parking lot and shuttled therefrom with our baggage to the terminal. For starters, their early discovery of books as a source of extracurricular and sometimes even curricular pleasure. Those Big Little Books, . You should know, one of us teased her-Gee, G. suspects, inasmuch as Ned was already remarking that a handful of whacks was exactly the right number: yet another possible explanation of the five-count. Don’t think I’m going to show you, came back pert Ruthie, whose budding breasts, as far as Gee could judge, were not yet cupped: Those peep-show days are in the attic for keeps.

Every Third Thought: A Novel in Five Seasons is a novel by American writer John Barth, published in 2011. The book is narrated by retired creative writing professor George Newett, who lives with his poet wife Amanda Todd

Every Third Thought: A Novel in Five Seasons is a novel by American writer John Barth, published in 2011. The book is narrated by retired creative writing professor George Newett, who lives with his poet wife Amanda Todd. The couple are living in a cramped rental while deciding what to do after the destruction of their Heron Bay Estates home, as depicted in Barth's previous book, The Development. As the book opens, the two are planning a trip to Shakespeare's birthplace.

Every Third Thought" refers to the reconsiderations after "on second thought", and the subtitle, "A Novel in Five . Barth has always played at this disappearing boundary between living a life and writing a story.

Every Third Thought" refers to the reconsiderations after "on second thought", and the subtitle, "A Novel in Five Seasons", refers to the seasons of George Newett's (and Barth's) life, and his marriage with Amanda. He is in his second "Fall" (the first centered on an actual fall on a vacation - hence a "trip and fall" - with Amanda, visiting Stratford, home of Shakespeare). I know it can be tedious at times, especially to un-indoctrinated readers, and it's coupled with a lot of alliterative stylings, puns, and the like. In the end though, Barth is living and telling a compelling story.

John Barth stays true to form in Every Third Thought, written .

John Barth stays true to form in Every Third Thought, written from the perspective of a character Barth introduced in his short story collection The Development. Every Third Thought has more to say about life, death, the ‘human condition,’ and maybe most particularly and surprisingly the deathlessness of love. than an entire constellation of newer, prettier literary lights. multilayered comic masterpiece.

Every Third Thought book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Every Third Thought: A Novel in Five Seasons as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Every Third Thought: A Novel in Five Seasons. John Barth stays true to form in Every Third Thought, written from the perspective of a character Barth introduced in his short story collection The Development. George I. Newett and his wife Amanda Todd lived in the gated community of Heron Bay Estates until its destruction by a fluke tornado. This event, Newett notes, occurred on the 77th anniversary of the 1929 stock market crash, a detail that would appear insignificant if it were not for several subsequent events.

Every Third Thought: A Novel in Five Seasons (2011) features a character from The Development who injures his head and then, with each change of the seasons, experiences moments from his past as if they are taking place in the present. Thank you for subscribing! Be on the lookout for your Britannica newsletter to get trusted stories delivered right to your inbox.

John Barth stays true to form in Every Third Thought, written from the perspective of a character Barth introduced in his short story collection The Development. George I. Newett and his wife Amanda Todd lived in the gated community of Heron Bay Estates until its destruction by a fluke tornado. This event, Newett notes, occurred on the 77th anniversary of the 1929 stock market crash, a detail that would appear insignificant if it were not for several subsequent events. The stress of the tornado’s devastation prompts the Newett-Todds to depart on a European vacation, during which George suffers a fall on none other than his 77th birthday, the first day of autumn (or more cryptically, Fall). Following this coincidence, George experiences the first of what is to become five serial visions, each appearing to him on the first day of the ensuing seasons, and each corresponding to a pivotal event in that season of his life.As the novel unfolds, so do these uncanny coincidences, and it is clear that, as ever, Barth possesses an unmatched talent in balancing his characteristic style and wit with vivid, page-turning storytelling.
Virn
I can't remember who it was who described Barth's writing as "self-consuming meta-fiction", but it definitely fits. But in a good way. This book, like some others before it (e.g., Once Upon a Time), narrates the fictional story of the writing of the book itself. The narrator, George I. Newett, is writing the book to complete the work of his lost friend, Ned Prosper, who may or may not have existed (within the story). You can't tell whether the story is being drawn from real life or real life is being drawn from the story. At one point in the book, Newett's wife and fellow writer, Amanda, jabs the theme in deep, saying, "So, then: Are we fictitious too . . . ?"

It's not all postmodern styling. There's a very good story here, and it grows on you. "Every Third Thought" refers to the reconsiderations after "on second thought", and the subtitle, "A Novel in Five Seasons", refers to the seasons of George Newett's (and Barth's) life, and his marriage with Amanda. He is in his second "Fall" (the first centered on an actual fall on a vacation -- hence a "trip and fall" -- with Amanda, visiting Stratford, home of Shakespeare).

Newett's second Fall parallels Barth's own, both author and character approaching their eightieth years as Barth was writing the book. I won't spoil the ending. The one thing I'll say about it is that it is sadly honest.

Barth has always played at this disappearing boundary between living a life and writing a story. I know it can be tedious at times, especially to un-indoctrinated readers, and it's coupled with a lot of alliterative stylings, puns, and the like. In the end though, Barth is living and telling a compelling story.
Vetitc
I'm no Barth scholar, but ten years ago, I was charmed and touched by his rambling postmodern The Floating Opera, a book he wrote in the mid-twentieth century. Like Pynchon and Kafka, he was ahead of his time. His meta-fiction wasn't just for show and self-indulgence; the wink-wink and digressing were salient to the themes, and showcased the sophistry of righteous absolutes (and its contradictions). It was an intellectual frolic into the act of writing itself, with a tender touch of comic genius.

His latest and slim novel is also a linguistic romp, and resurrects some familiar subjects/settings, such as a love triangle, prostate troubles, and his beloved Eastern Shore of Maryland, specifically Stratford. Retired professor G.I. Newitt experiences some strange catastrophic flukes associated with a series of visions. He is subsequently inspired to chronicle these seasonal occurrences and phenomena, such as a "post-equinoctial vision" and a "solstitial illumination." The latest casualties include a tornado that wiped out the retirement community that he lived in with his wife (and muse), Amanda, and a fall on his 77th birthday in another Stratford--the one particular to the Bard. Newitt's efforts to pen his memoir is the central event, and he shares every daily outburst of desultory thought with Amanda.

I am surprised that this is the same author who wrote The Floating Opera. There was nothing here to tantalize beyond some lexical stretching. The narrative was self-conscious and obvious, like the protagonist's name. (G.I. Newitt is as blunt and prosaic as Seymour Butts.) The events, and the telling of them, were repetitive and dull, the narrative style antiquated and stilted. The most inspired was the title's allusion to Prospero's lines in The Tempest.

It read like Barth just showed up for practice, much like the gasbag Newitt, and was compelled to cough up all the topical issues of the day--the war, the Bush administration, the government's failure during natural disasters, Hilary vs Obama. But it was arid and lusterless; notions stuck to the page like Teflon, a reiteration of the mundane. It managed to be both capricious and monotonous. It was ostensibly about aging and mortality, but it was derivative, uninspired. Pithy scribbles and warm-ups weren't enough to support a gimmicky, stale story.
JoldGold
I do. He's not the guy I thought he was after reading "The end of the road"- paralyzed. He's at his best flipping through some whys and what all's as he then surprises with the next plot twist. This book is that, aimed inward. The plot does eventually, or is, eventually turning on him and the near ending is hard. You'll want to know, if you like John Barth.
Rgia
One of my favorite authors.
Saithi
Different, unique unlike anything I have read.
Every Third Thought: A Novel in Five Seasons ebook
Author:
John Barth
Category:
Genre Fiction
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1194 kb
FB2 size:
1514 kb
DJVU size:
1499 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Counterpoint (October 11, 2011)
Pages:
208 pages
Rating:
4.1
Other formats:
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