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Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence ebook

by Nugi Garimara Doris Pilkington


Doris Pilkington Garimara AM (born Nugi Garimara; c. 1 July 1937 – 10 April 2014), also known as Doris Pilkington, was an Australian author.

Doris Pilkington Garimara AM (born Nugi Garimara; c. She wrote Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence (1996), a story of three Aboriginal girls, among them Pilkington's mother, Molly Craig, who escaped from the Moore River Native Settlement in Western Australia and travelled 2,414 km (1,500 miles) for nine weeks to return to their family.

Doris Pilkington’s traditional name is Nugi Garimara.

Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). Doris Pilkington’s traditional name is Nugi Garimara. She was born in 1937 on Balfour Downs Station in the homeland of her Mardu ancestors. As a toddler she was removed by authorities from her home at the station and committed to Moore River Native Settlement, from which she escaped.

Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence Paperback – October 1, 2013. by Pilkington Doris (Author). Molly and the two younger girls, sisters Daisy and Gracie run away from the school within days of arriving with only the clothes on their backs and no provisions. They amazingly manage to survive using their native skills in hunting and finding clean water and later strangers who give them food and clothing.

Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence is considered a powerful example of the mistreatments endured by the Stolen . Doris Pilkington Garimara. Fourteen-year-old Molly and her cousins Daisy and Gracie were mixed-race Aborigines.

Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence is considered a powerful example of the mistreatments endured by the Stolen Generation. Her follow-up book, Under the Wintamarra Tree, details her own escape from Moore River. In the three books, Caprice, a Stockman's Daughter, Follow the Rabbit-proof Fence and Under the Wintamarra Tree Pilkington was to document three generations of women in her family. The book was made into an internationally successful film in 2002, directed by Phillip Noyce.

Doris Pilkington Garimara, also known as Doris Pilkington, was an Australian author. Her mother, Molly, named her Nugi Garimara, but she was called Doris after Molly's employer at the station, Mary Dunnet, who thought Nugi was "a stupid name"

Doris Pilkington Garimara, also known as Doris Pilkington, was an Australian author  . Her mother, Molly, named her Nugi Garimara, but she was called Doris after Molly's employer at the station, Mary Dunnet, who thought Nugi was "a stupid name". As her birth was unregistered, her birth date was recorded as 1 July 1937 by the Department of Native Affairs. She was taken from her mother to be raised at the Moore River mission when she was three and a half years old.

Doris Garimara Pilkington. Under Western Australia's invidious removal policy of the 1930s, the girls were taken from their Aboriginal families at Jigalong on the edge of the Little Sandy Desert, and transported halfway across the state to the Native Settlement at Moore River, north of Perth. Here Aboriginal children were instructed in the ways of white society and forbidden to speak their native tongue.

Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence book.

This book can be found in: Politics, Society & Education Society & culture Social groups Ethnic studies. Follow The Rabbit Proof Fence (Paperback). Doris Garimara Pilkington (author).

Rabbit-Proof Fence is the story of 3 young part-Aboriginal girls in Australia, the oldest only fifteen years of ag. I was enthralled by this story. It is also educational. Having seen the movie, I just had to read the book to get the details-and I might add, the real truth about the details.

Rabbit-Proof Fence is the story of 3 young part-Aboriginal girls in Australia, the oldest only fifteen years of age. Historically, "half-caste children", (half-Aboriginal and half-Caucasian) were considered wards of the Australian government and were, therefore, forcibly removed from their families and taken to settlment schools that were little more than jails. For example, in the book it is Gracie and Daisy, not Molly, who first approach a house for food. I don't know why this is changed in the movie.

Электронная книга "Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence", Doris Pilkington

Электронная книга "Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence", Doris Pilkington. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Vishura
I saw the film some years ago and like it very much, so downloaded this version. I found the book difficult to follow, choppy and loaded with unfamiliar aboriginal language. The last complaint was mitigated by finding, at the end of the volume, a relatively complete glossary. A little upfront notice would have helped. The book is written by a descendant of the original participants, perhaps explaining the obvious gaps in the narrative, but the perspective is that of the participants rather than of a historical rendition. A little more background on the status of the aboriginal people at the relevant time would have been useful, especially to non-Australians like me. All of those gripes having been aired, let me add that there is much to admire in the courage, resourcefulness and bushcraft knowledge of the key participants. I am sure that very few outsiders could have survived such a journey, let alone doing so with apparent matter-of-fact aplomb. This is my first book from a native Australian author. I will be looking for more voices of such a unique experience of life in such an outwardly inhospitable environment.
Quynaus
It's a must read. If we don't inform ourselves about the horrors of the past, we may very well be destined to repeat it. Read it, and pass the information on to the young ones around you.
Marr
This is the story of three Aboriginal half caste girls removed from their families in Western Australia by government officials who sent them 1000 miles away to a 'residential school', more like a prison than a boarding school, where they were incarcerated and expected to learn to read and write and speak English before being sent off to be servants. The author, Doris Pilkington (Aboriginal name Nugi Garimara)is the daughter of the eldest girl, Molly and she retells their story in simple, straightforward language.

Molly and the two younger girls, sisters Daisy and Gracie run away from the school within days of arriving with only the clothes on their backs and no provisions. They amazingly manage to survive using their native skills in hunting and finding clean water and later strangers who give them food and clothing. Somehow, partly due to the rain and partly to their skills at hiding they manage to evade the police and the trackers sent to find them. Molly is familiar with the rabbit proof fence that runs the length of the state and knows if she can find that then they will just need to follow it home.

Although told simply, this incredible story of tenacity and survival is powerful in portraying the devastation of white settlement on Australia's Aboriginal communities, first by depriving them of their land and the ability to feed themselves and then by allowing a paternalistic government to deprive them of their mixed race children.
Adrierdin
A poignant story of two sisters, this novel touches the heart. This story is fairly well written, but the true value is the inspiration. While many students read "Night" about the holocaust, this story offers a modern example/reference for comparison of the struggles faced by young people in times of oppression.

I listened to this story as an audio book instead of reading it. There were times when I felt reading it would have been better as some areas were harder to follow.

Reader warning - this is often a difficult story to hear as it covers a difficult topic.
Gralmeena
This was another story revealed of the misuse and mistreatment of young women of another culture. Disheartening in specifics but hurrah for the children who had basic tribe teachings to get them home again over 1000 miles of terrain. I was on the edge of my chair most of the book. Leave them alone, they can take care of their own - the moral of the story.
Mustard Forgotten
I first saw the Miramax movie starring Kenneth Branagh, which was based upon this book. I was intrigued enough by the film to read this book. I was not disappointed. This book is certainly a testament to the human spirit. It also reveals the harsh, paternalistic and racist policies that the Australian government imposed upon its Aboriginal population.

In 1931, the Australian government issued an edict that mandated that all Aboriginal and part Aboriginal children were to be forcibly removed from their homes and taken to special settlements where they were to be assimilated. There, while living in inhumane and degrading conditions, they would be taught to be culturally white, would be mandated to speak English only, and would be trained to be domestic help or laborers in white households.

The author tells the reader the story of three young girls, Mollie, Gracie, and Daisy, who had Aboriginal mothers and White fathers. Ranging in age from nine to fifteen years old, the three girls were forcibly removed from their loving families and taken to a special settlement. The girls rebelled against this system, and, homesick, escaped from such a settlement. They left with iterally just the clothes on their back. Their only guide home would be a rabbit-proof fence that stretched for over a thousand miles across Australia.

The girls Aboriginal heritage and survival skills would come in handy throughout their nearly nine week long trek across Australia, as they were forced to subsist on the land and the occasional kindness from strangers. They had to endure thirst, hunger, and danger, while avoiding being caught along the way by professional trackers, police on the lookout for them, and white settlers that were unsympathetic to their situation.

This story is a most personal one for the author, as one of the girls, Molly, is the author's mother. Told in a straightforward, factual manner, it is an incredible story that is an indictment of the Australian government's racist policies against its Aboriginal people and its imperialistic self-proclaimed superiority over them.
Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence ebook
Author:
Nugi Garimara Doris Pilkington
Category:
Genre Fiction
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1909 kb
FB2 size:
1649 kb
DJVU size:
1951 kb
Language:
Publisher:
University of Queensland Pr (Australia) (1996)
Pages:
136 pages
Rating:
4.6
Other formats:
mobi lit mbr lrf
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