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Black Rain ebook

by Masuji Ibuse


Black Rain (黒い雨, Kuroi Ame) is a novel by Japanese author Masuji Ibuse. Ibuse began serializing Black Rain in the magazine Shincho in January 1965.

Black Rain (黒い雨, Kuroi Ame) is a novel by Japanese author Masuji Ibuse. The novel is based on historical records of the devastation caused by the atomic bombing of Hiroshima. The book alternates between Shizuma Shigematsu's journal entries and other characters from August 6–15, 1945, Hiroshima, and the present

Black Rain is centered around the story of a young woman who was caught in the radioactive "black rain" that fell after the bombing of Hiroshima.

Black Rain is centered around the story of a young woman who was caught in the radioactive "black rain" that fell after the bombing of Hiroshima. lbuse bases his tale on real-life diaries and interviews with victims of the holocaust; the result is a book that is free from sentimentality yet manages to reveal the magnitude of the human suffering caused by. the atom bomb. The life of Yasuko, on whom the black rain fell, is changed forever by periodic bouts of radiation sickness and the suspicion that her future children, too, may be affected

The classic English book about it is Hiroshima by John Hersey, but I felt like I wanted something written by a Japanese person, so here we are with Masuji Ibuse's Black Rain, also a classic

Black Rain is a novel by Japanese author Masuji Ibuse. The classic English book about it is Hiroshima by John Hersey, but I felt like I wanted something written by a Japanese person, so here we are with Masuji Ibuse's Black Rain, also a classic. Both books are based on interviews with Japanese people who survived Hiroshima. Black Rain turns them into a novel of sorts, with a framing story.

I would recommend Black Rain to every reader, even the squeamish. MASUJI IBUSE was born in Kamo, Hiroshima Prefecture, in 1898. He majored in French at Waseda University and joined the School of Fine Arts to pursue a serious interest in painting. Its subtle ironies and noble, unsentimental pity are a reminder of the strengths of Japanese fiction. His first story, "Salamander," was published in 1923, when Ibuse was still a student, and by the early 1930s his eloquent use of dialect and his unique prose style had established him as one of the leading figures in the Japanese literary world.

Masuji Ibuse (井伏 鱒二) was a Japanese novelist. Ibuse was known and appreciated for most of his career, although it wasn't until after the war that he became famous. The novel draws its material from the bombing of Hiroshima with the title referring to the nuclear fallout.

Graveyards packed Jail House crowded Black Rain, Black Rain. They just gave my cousin Bronson A dime piece All of a sudden muthafuckas they don blind me Wish I can walk around the corner and find Bleek Scoop Fin in my Charger with his nine beam Remind Sneed that coke ain't what you need homie Rest in peace to all y'all pussies that was hating on. me I got a head with no screws Boosie you'on listen I'm on a mission tryna get my fucking blood out prison Black rain in Angloa where the thugs roll Too many members gone that I know Hoochie, Moo, and Lil Joe I just did.

Masuji Ibuse: 黒い雨 (Black Rain). Ibuse uses a framing technique. Shizuma Shigematsu is looking after his niece, Yasuko. They live in Hiroshima some years after the bomb. He is trying to get her married but whenever a possible suitor appears, he hears a rumour that she has radiation sickness because she was in Hiroshima when the bomb fell

Black Rain is centered around the story of a young woman who was caught in the radioactive black rain' that fell after the bombing of Hiroshima.

Black Rain is centered around the story of a young woman who was caught in the radioactive black rain' that fell after the bombing of Hiroshima.

The people of a Japanese village fight to maintain their humanity and tradition in the radioactive "rain" after Hiroshima
Onoxyleili
This is the most beautiful and most sad thing I've ever read. I literally had no idea.

Thankfully, the author does not preach about the evils of what happened. Rather, Black Rain simply describes what it was like for a few of the survivors of Hiroshima. It includes the events of that black day in 1945, but also talks about what happened to the people next; how their lives were effected by the radiation sickness and even worse. The stigma of being at Hiroshima ruined their future. You would think they had suffered enough without the addition of such harmful gossip from their fellow countrymen.

It's very hard to see where the lines between fiction and non-fiction are in this book, but to me, that's what makes it so great.

The kindle version has an interactive table of contents, and one can easily navigate between the chapters using the 5-way controller.
Rocksmith
This book is excellent because it zooms in on and transforms what is unquestionably a horrific tragedy of war into clear, everyday, straightforward, even mundane (but never boring) depictions of what average, ordinary human beings lived through in the days, weeks, and years following the dropping of the bombs. Most of the book is narration in the form of a journal written by an older japanese man (Shigematsu) who (along with his wife and neice) lived through the dropping of the bomb in Hiroshima. Along the way other persons' diaries or recollections are interspersed to form a chronological picture of the days before and after the bomb. The accounts are in themselves written in ordinary speech, and have the feel of conversation, as though you'd been invited for dinner over to these people's houses, and they talked to you of some of their experiences...telling what they saw, what they heard, what they felt. The genius of the book is weaving the accounts into a cohesive whole, and making no judgment or commentary on the events other than the opinions expressed in the accounts. These are everyday accounts in everyday speech, and perhaps for that very reason, make the tragedy the more real -- Shigematsu and the others notice some details more than others, just the way that you the reader in your own life notice some things and not others. These details ring incredibly true...you (as the reader) are transported to the scene. You become both inured to seeing disfigurement and death because it is everywhere, but moved at seeing it because it is your own friend or loved one who has been instantly burned, or who, years after the blast, only then starts to lose their hair, and their teeth, and to develop terrible sores. Excellent, excellent book.
Opimath
Even if written years after 1945, this still has great impact. I also watched the film that sprung from the book. (Somewhat different as it focused at the marriageability of the young woman and the deaths of the other characters rather than the diary of that week after the bomb was dropped).
Cerar
I got this book for a literature assignment, but I was able to choose which story I wanted to read and this one interested me the most. There is not really graphic violence per say, but there are a lot of graphic descriptions of the people that were injured by the bomb. For anyone that enjoys history, or Japan and its culture, or literature in general, this is an excellent story that should be read.
Eta
This is a quietly terrifying book, one of the best anti-war novels ever written. it's oddly similar to Dante's Inferno, in part of course because the reality of HIroshima the day of and days following are similar to Dante's disturbing vision of hell but also because the narrator walks quietly through the horror and gathers both his own, his family's, and other people's stories. The contrast between the description of beauty and horror give the book much of its power. Much of the beauty is in the glimpses of the agrarian and community life, in the love of family, and some of it is in simple, stunning imagery. Even the explosion itself is gone back to, over and over, in an attempt to get the words right.

It's a sobering book, and a necessary one for any student of World War II or of world history. The difference between the country--the land, the community and its traditions--and the state is a distinction that will stay with me.
Wetiwavas
It’s not sentimental. But it doesn’t mean it doesn’t provoke sentiments. In its simplicity it reveals the dilemmas, tragedy, social norms and fears of Japanese society.
A must-read for a hands-on account on the implications of war.
Black Rain ebook
Author:
Masuji Ibuse
Category:
Genre Fiction
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1703 kb
FB2 size:
1542 kb
DJVU size:
1149 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Demco Media (February 1, 2002)
Rating:
4.9
Other formats:
lrf doc azw lit
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