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Booth: A Novel ebook

by David M. Robertson


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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. A gripping historical novel in the bestselling tradition of The Alienist and Time and Again. The narrator is John Surratt, a real participant in the conspiracy to assassinate Abraham Lincoln, a conspiracy which was led by John Wilkes Booth.

I believe that David Robertson's novel does have these kinds of impacts on the readers of BOOTH , making the reading of this novel a positive reading experience along with being a learning experience. One man involved in the conspiracy to assassinate Abraham Lincoln was acquitted. Based on contemporary diaries, reminiscences, and court transcripts, biographer David Robertson attempts to tell lowly John Surratt's story in the historical novel Booth, set in 1916 and in the last days of the Civil War.

This book reminded me a lot of Manhunt in that it looks at the Lincoln assassination through Booth's perspective (or at least, spins the focus entirely on him more so than anyone else) Читать весь.

A gripping historical novel set amidst the confusion and chaos of the Civil War, "Booth is the story of the only conspirator in the plot to assassinate Abraham Lincoln who was not killed or executed-a young man who falls under the spell of the charismatic and captivating world-famous stage actor, and is gradually sucked into the vortex of. Booth's insidious plans. This book reminded me a lot of Manhunt in that it looks at the Lincoln assassination through Booth's perspective (or at least, spins the focus entirely on him more so than anyone else) Читать весь отзыв.

This book reminded me a lot of Manhunt in that it looks at the Lincoln assassination through Booth's perspective (or at least, spins the focus entirely on him more so than anyone else).

This book reminded me a lot of Manhunt in that it looks at the Lincoln assassination through Booth's perspective (or at least, spins the focus entirely on him more so than anyone else) Читать весь отзыв.

The novel A gripping historical novel set amidst the confusion and chaos of the Civil War, Booth is the story of the only conspirator in the plot to assassinate Abraham Lincoln who was not killed or executed-a young man who falls under the spell of the charismatic and captivating world-famous stage actor, and is gradually sucked into the vortex.

Find nearly any book by David M Robertson. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Booth: A Novel: ISBN 9780553479195 (978-0-553-47919-5) Random House Audio, 1997. Booth: A Novel: ISBN 9780385487078 (978-0-385-48707-8) Softcover, Anchor, 1998. Denmark Vesey: The Buried History of America's Largest Slave Rebellion and the Man Who Led It. by David M Robertson. ISBN 9780679442882 (978-0-679-44288-2) Hardcover, Alfred A. Knopf, 1999.

In a remarkable feat of historical detective work, David Robertson illuminates the shadowy figure who planned a slave rebellion so. .David Robertson is the author of a biography of James F. Byrnes and Booth: A Novel. He lives in La France, South Carolina.

In a remarkable feat of historical detective work, David Robertson illuminates the shadowy figure who planned a slave rebellion so daring that, if successful, it might have changed the face of the antebellum South. This is the story of a man who, like Nat Turner, Marcus Garvey, and Malcolm X, is a complex yet seminal hero in the history of African American emancipation. Denmark Vesey was a charasmatic ex-slave-literate, professional, and relatively well-off-who had purchased his own freedom with the winnings from a lottery.

The book's characters act in roles that roughly correspond to Jungian .

The book's characters act in roles that roughly correspond to Jungian archetypes according to Davies' belief in the predominance of spirit over the things of the world. Davies built on the success of Fifth Business with two more novels: The Manticore (1972), a novel cast largely in the form of a Jungian analysis (for which he received that year's Governor General's Literary Award), and World of Wonders (1975). Together these three books came to be known as The Deptford Trilogy. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press.

I’ve just begun reading your book Destroying the Narrative ading your section on Native Americans it made me recall a series of books by Allan Eckert that he describes as a narrative history of the East Coast of the USA during.

Get news on the latest releases from David M Robertson and the latest news regarding his work. I’ve just begun reading your book Destroying the Narrative ading your section on Native Americans it made me recall a series of books by Allan Eckert that he describes as a narrative history of the East Coast of the USA during the colonial period through the American Revolution. I found his books fascinating and easy to read.

In Robertson Davies’ last novel, he returns to those issues which concerned him throughout his writing career–the .

In Robertson Davies’ last novel, he returns to those issues which concerned him throughout his writing career–the nature of friendship, religion, faith, and artistic life–with his famous wit and humour and his usual rich characterization. The second novel in Robertson Davies’ critically acclaimed Deptford Trilogy, The Manticore is a fascinating exploration, by an exquisite stylist, of those regions beyond reason where monsters live. David Staunton, the son of Percy Boyd Staunton, travels to Switzerland.

A gripping historical novel set amidst the confusion and chaos of the Civil War, Booth is the story of the only conspirator in the plot to assassinate Abraham Lincoln who was not killed or executed--a young man who falls under the spell of the charismatic and captivating world-famous stage actor, and is gradually sucked into the vortex of Booth's insidious plans.The novel opens in 1916, the last year of narrator John Surratt's life. Surratt, who has spent the years since Lincoln's death as an obscure shipping clerk, is approached by D.W. Griffith to read from his Civil War diary in Griffith's movie Birth of a Nation.  As Surratt reads over his diary for the first time in fifty years, the reader returns to the tumultuous days of 1864, and a chance encounter between Surratt and John Wilkes Booth.  Booth, a larger-than-life personality whose appetites, fame, and sheer force of will bedazzle everyone around him, helps to secure Surratt a position as the assistant to renowned photographer Alexander Gardner.  Over the following weeks, Booth continues to lavish attention on Surratt, slowly drawing him bit by bit into his web of intrigue.  By the time Surratt discovers the desperate nature of Booth's true intentions, it is too late, and he finds himself caught up in a firestorm of violence that shatters forever his insulated life and mild ambitions.Based on the actual historical record of the plot to kill Lincoln, and illustrated with photographs of the conspirators and their execution, the novel is filled with the kind of detail of nineteenth-century architecture, photography, and day-to-day bustle that brings Civil War Washington vividly to life.  A powerful evocation of a dangerous, chaotic, and tragic time, Booth is the compulsively readable story of the most infamous assassination in our history, as well as a riveting portrait of an enigmatic figure who continues to haunt the American imagination.Booth is a selection of both the Barnes and Noble "Discover Great New Writers" program and Borders' "Discover" program.
Skilkancar
This is a great book - I read it long ago and decided to track it down so I could read it again. I don't generally enjoy historical fiction, but this book was so well written and made me care about the characters so much, I was compelled to research and learn more about this period in history.
Akirg
I found this book to be engaging and compelling. It's historical fiction. So for me, I just go along for the ride, pick up some interesting information along the way, and get lost in the story. The pace of the story was good and I felt connected to the characters. Probably one of my favorite books of this type.
Kieel
Just for information: the edition of this book that I am reviewing is not the large print 1988 edition listed by Amazon. It is a standard sized print edition published in 1998 by Doubleday's Anchor Books division.

The narrator is John Surratt, a real participant in the conspiracy to assassinate Abraham Lincoln, a conspiracy which was led by John Wilkes Booth. As the author states in his "Sources and Acknowledgements" at the end of the book, his novel is essentially correct in all pertinent details, but has been "fictionalized" in ways that enhance the telling of the story.

The narrative is made up of interconnected excerpts earlier diary written from 1864 to 1865, and the diary of John Wilkes Booth written during the days between his murder of Abraham Lincoln and his (Surratt's) about two weeks later; excerpts from testimony in the trials of Mary Surratt (John's mother), shortly after the assasination, and that of John Surratt about two years later, after his capture in Italy and deportation to America.

__BOOTH__ opens with Surratt's first diary entry in 1916 written shortly after he has been contacted by famed early film pioneer D.W. Griffith who wants Surratt to collaborate with him in the making of a movie about the assassination of Lincoln. Surratt's collaboration would be extremely valuable because he has in his possession his own diaries from the asassination period and a number of photographs that could greatly enhance the movie.

This request from Griffith causes Surratt to reread his old diaries and look at his old photos for the first time in about 50 years. These diaries form the core of __BOOTH__.

If we are to believe Surratt's diary entries, he was a rather unwilling participant in the conspiracy, and until the very end, he believed that Booth intended to kidnap Lincoln, not to murder him. He also tells us that his mother, Mary Surratt, was not a part of the plot, and was only arrested because of "guilt by association."

John Wilkes Booth is presented as a very intelligent man who is extremely charismatic, and as one who seems to effortlessly charm everyone he meets, including both Surratt, his mother, and his sister.

The basic history of the events surrounding Booth's assassination of Lincoln in Ford's theatre in Washington, D.C. are well known.

Booth shot Lincoln in Lincoln's box in the theater, jumped to the stage, broke his leg in the jump but still managed to escape. He evaded capture for about two weeks, but was finally found hiding in a barn and shot and killed by a Union soldier.

Boooth's three major co-conspirators, Lewis Powell, David Herold, and George Atzerodt were quickly captured along with Mary Surratt. Evidently, had Lewis Powell not been captured in Mary Surratt's boarding house Mary would never have been arrested, but arrested she was. She, along with the three true members of the conspiracy, was found guilty and hanged. The evidence against her, as given by one of her boarders, was that she had often been seen in the company of Booth, and that another of the conspirators, George Atzerodt had done gardening work for her. Questionable evidence of participation in a conspiracy, at best, but found guilty nonetheless.

John Surratt escaped to Europe, where he lived for two years before being returned to the U.S. and tried. He was not found guilty and was released and lived for another 50 years.

One of the major fictional devices that Robertson (the author used) was to make Surratt a photographer in the employ of Alexander Gardner, a famous Civil War photographer. Robertson says that he did this to more easily work in the photographs he has included in the book. Amongst other photos are several of Booth, one famous battlefield photo of a dead Confederate soldier, three gallows shots of the four prisoners, both before and after the hanging, and a photo of Sergeant Boston Corbett, the man who shot Booth. Also, there is no historical indication that the contact in 1916 between Surratt and Griffith ever happened, but it is a useful device to set up the whole novel

As is so often the case, there is no way in a short review to convey the emotional and dramatic impact that a good author can bring into play. I believe that David Robertson's novel does have these kinds of impacts on the readers of _BOOTH__, making the reading of this novel a positive reading experience along with being a learning experience.
Pad
One man involved in the conspiracy to assassinate Abraham Lincoln was acquitted. Based on contemporary diaries, reminiscences, and court transcripts, biographer David Robertson attempts to tell lowly John Surratt's story in the historical novel Booth, set in 1916 and in the last days of the Civil War.
The action begins as D.W. Griffith is premiering his 1916 movie "Birth of a Nation" in Washington, D.C. where he arranges a meeting with the aged Surratt, who has long kept silent about his role in Lincoln's death. Griffith, a publicity hound, would like to get Surratt on film sharing reminiscences and photographs of the Civil War. For Griffith, Surratt is pure gold: a chance to further claim the spotlight and publicize his film.
But Surratt is torn, having lived most of his adult life anonymously after the tragic events surrounding Lincoln's assassination. Through his diary, we learn exactly how he was drawn into the conspiracy in 1864, and the tale takes some exciting and even grotesque turns before reaching its predictable conclusion in 1916.
Character development is not Robertson's strength and the book is filled with stick figures, including Surratt's own as an ingenuous young man. More importantly, until near the end, Booth himself is pretty much an enigma in the book. Though he is supposed to be charismatic, Robertson hasn't demonstrated that by giving us a rich, living character.
The author's skills as a writer lie elsewhere: He brings to teeming and fascinating life a Washington DC (Washington City in the book) as distant to us in its own way as Ancient Rome. It's a city with a half-finished Washington Monument and a Capitol dome under construction. A city where a traffic jam is caused by troops in transit colliding with cattle being driven to market; where the smell of produce and corpses mingles; where officers (but not their troops) enjoy nudie tableaux vivants in grimy saloons.
Since the beginning of the war, Washington City has been flooded with prostitutes who offer momentary forgetfulness of the horrors of war, and with mediums who offer contact with the dead. "In the midst of so much death, shipped from the battlefields by the Union army in the tens of thousands each year.... and the daily arrival in the city of so many distraught family members and spouses desperate for contact with a loved one, these people made a very good living." There's a dramatic and intriguing scene of a medium being unmasked as a fraud here.
The novel's most gripping sequence is a trip to the nearby battlefront in Virginia to photograph Confederate dead. Most fascinating of all, Robertson brings us in on the contemporary craze for portrait photography that reaches even into the White House. We learn a great deal about the mid-century art and science of working with a camera indoors and in the open air. By taking some clever liberties with the historical record, he makes photography central to his story. Booth is unexpectedly full of evocative details and insights into what the craze meant and how it changed Americans. Lev Raphael, author of LITTLE MISS EVIL, the 4th Nick Hoffman mystery ([...]
Booth: A Novel ebook
Author:
David M. Robertson
Category:
Genre Fiction
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1613 kb
FB2 size:
1952 kb
DJVU size:
1903 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Doubleday; 1st Anchor Books ed edition (1998)
Pages:
336 pages
Rating:
4.1
Other formats:
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