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The Lambs of London (Sound Library) ebook

by Alex Jennings,Peter Ackroyd


Also By Peter Ackroyd. THIS IS NOT a biography but a work of fiction. I LOATHE THE STENCH of horses.

Also By Peter Ackroyd. I have invented characters and changed the life of the Lamb family for the sake of the larger narrative. chapter one. Mary Lamb walked over to the window, and touched very lightly the faded lace fringe of her dress. It was a dress of the former period that she wore unembarrassed, as if it were of no consequence how she chose to cover herself. The city is a great jakes.

Peter Ackroyd's latest novel, The Lambs of London, embroils Charles and Mary Lamb in a pungent tale of Shakespearean plagiarism. Curious, melancholy Charles Lamb has always appealed to Peter Ackroyd. The Georgian essayist, tender and puckish, with a weakness for oddity and alcohol, is one of the great chroniclers of London. The pair are at the centre of Ackroyd's new novel, which returns to the literary plagiarism territory of Chatterton.

By (author) Peter Ackroyd, Read by Alex Jennings. Mary Lamb is confined by domesticity: her father is losing his mind, her mother watchful and hostile. The great solace of her life is her brother Charles, an aspiring writer. It is no surprise when Mary falls for the local bookseller's son, antiquarian William Ireland, from whom Charles has purchased a book. But this is no ordinary book-it once belonged to William Shakespeare himself, or so everyone believes.

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The Lambs of London book. Mary Lamb is confined by the restrictions of domesticity: her. In The Lambs of London, Peter Ackroyd brilliantly creates an urban world of scholars and entrepreneurs, a world in which a clever son will stop at nothing to impress his showman father, and no one knows quite what to believe. Ingenious and vividly alive, The Lambs of London is a poignant, gripping novel of betrayal and deceit.

Mary Lamb walked over to the window, and touched very lightly the faded lace fringe of her dress. The city is a great jakes

Mary Lamb walked over to the window, and touched very lightly the faded lace fringe of her dress. There was no one in the drawing-room with her, so she put her face upwards, towards the sun. Her skin was marked by the scars of smallpox, suffered by her six years before; so she held her face to the light, and imagined it to be the pitted moon. I have found it, dear. It was hiding in All’s Well.

American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg . by. Ackroyd, Peter, 1949-.

American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. For bored siblings Charles and Mary Lamb, the works of Shakespeare furnish a respite from the boredom and domesticity of their lives, until William Ireland, an antiquarian bookseller, claims to possess a long-lost Shakespearean play.

Peter Ackroyd was born in London in 1949. He continued writing poetry until he began delving into historical fiction with The Great Fire of London (1982). He graduated from Cambridge University and was a Fellow at Yale (1971-1973). A critically acclaimed and versatile writer, Ackroyd began his career while at Yale, publishing two volumes of poetry. A constant theme in Ackroyd's work is the blending of past, present, and future, often paralleling the two in his biographies and novels.

ISBN 10: 140567217X ISBN 13: 9781405672177. Publisher: BBC Audio Books, 2005. Preloaded portable book. If it is added to AbeBooks by one of our member booksellers, we will notify you! Create a Want. Customers who bought this item also bought.

Acclaim for Peter Ackroyd’s Shakespeare Ackroyd-novelist, poet, critic . His most recent books include The Lambs of London and . W. Turner, the second biography in the Ackroyd Brief Lives series.

Acclaim for Peter Ackroyd’s Shakespeare Ackroyd-novelist, poet, critic, biographer, historian, omnivore-has been building toward this biography for decades. Ackroyd-novelist, poet, critic, biographer, historian, omnivore-has been building toward this biography for decades. He knows the 16th century, and he knows the artistic soul.

Mary Lamb is confined by domesticity: her father is losing his mind, her mother watchful and hostile. The great solace of her life is her brother Charles, an aspiring writer. It is no surprise when Mary falls for the local bookseller's son, antiquarian William Ireland, from whom Charles has purchased a book. But this is no ordinary book-it once belonged to William Shakespeare himself, or so everyone believes.
komandante
Wonderfully written! Loved reading about life in 19th century England.
Paster
Peter Ackroyd does it again! Brilliant!
IGOT
I didn't care for this book at all. Too speculative, and the characters were not especially likable.
Umsida
"The future is as nothing, being everything…The past is everything, being nothing."

Peter Ackroyd's "Lambs of London" is a fictionalized account of the 18th century hoax that 'discovered' lost works of Shakespeare. When a widow discovers that her late husband had a house full of old documents, she allows a young bookseller's son named William Ireland to take inventory and keep anything he deems of value. Inside the treasure trove are dozens of documents belonging to the Bard himself - including several lost plays. When the first play is staged, it is not exactly a success. But while Ireland has several experts who can vouch for the documents' authenticity, others are skeptical. He is, after all, reluctant to name the woman whose home he discovered them in, and is determined to keep other experts away from the documents themselves.

Ireland has made friends with a set of siblings, Charles and Mary Lamb, who live with their ailing parents a few blocks from his father's bookstore. Mary, in particular, is enamored with everything Shakespeare, and when popular opinion starts to turn against Ireland and his "found" plays, she is determined to support him no matter what. But when the true origin of the plays is determined, it has disastrous results for the Lamb family.

Is "The Lambs of London" a great literary masterpiece? No. It's interesting, a diversion, a way of looking at the possibilities behind an historic event. I wouldn't recommend buying it unless you're a lover of anything Shakespeare, but it's a nice little read.
happy light
Set at the beginning of the 19th century - not so vastly long ago, yet long enough that antiquarians of the time might have Elizabethan documents among their treasures. In this most enjoyable fiction, Ackroyd conflates two true stories: that of Charles and Mary Lamb, academic siblings living a stifling life with their senile father and authorative mother. And William Ireland: employed in his family bookshop and, like Mary, feeling downtrodden by his parent. Until one day he comes into possession of some writings, including unpublished works,by Shakespeare...
Although the Lambs and Ireland never actually had any dealings with one another, this makes for a great read that really transports you back to London of that era.
Abywis
I'm not a scholar of Shakespeare nor historic England, but I found the combination of a book that delved into Shakespeare and life 200 years ago to be an irresistable combination. In this novel, author PEter Ackroyd takes a true event -- the forgery of some Shakespeare letters, poems, and a play -- and brings the perpetrators and other early 19th-century Shakespearians to life.

For me, the most entertaining thing was to try to inhabit the minds of people who literally seemed to have Shakespeare at-hand in their everyday speech and perception. They could quote him as easily as we'd quote lines from a sitcom or commercial. And "they" were not necessarily scholars and children of nobility. These were shopkeepers and clerks -- but with ambitions, intelligence, and intensity. I'd like to think that I would have been able to do so, if I had been raised in that environment, too.

The pace of the story never slackens. We first meet Mary Lamb (an old maid, destined to care for her senile father) and Charles Lamb (her brother, a clerk with the East India company who dreams of glory as a literary critic and essayist). Since childhood, these two have been close, and they have shared a love of language and intellectual conversation. While Mary is house-bound, due to the restrictions of her era, Charles works and goes drinking with his friends several night a week. He's found a boisterous, reasonably literate crew of pals, and they respect the small articles he's been able to place in literary publications. Charles meets -- or rather, is baited by -- William Ireland, an ambitious and possibly genius 17-year-old son of a bookseller. Ireland begins to share with William and Mary a series of Shakespeare pieces -- a letter, a poem -- that he has forged. When these are declared by scholars to be genuine, William presents his greatest forgery: an entire play. The play is produced, and it's met with derision and closes in six nights, as, perhaps, the public senses that it's not really Shakespeare. The forgeries unravel, and lives unravel. Ironically, William did it to impress his father and to test his literary skills, but not for glory or money (which are the reasons his father pursued the verification to its ultimate failure).

The author does a deft job of sketching scenes and then leaving them before you get everything you want. You want to hear more from Charles' cronies, who are witty and foolish at the same time. You want the mini-play that Charles tries to produce to be done more than once (in front a inmates in an asylum). You want Mary and William to fall in love and read plays and poetry together for 40 years. You want Charles to achieve his ambition as a literary critic. And so on.

The only clunker in this book is a two-page visit that William and his father make to a pair of clerics who are Shakespeare scholars, and who become crucial to the deception because they are pleased that the newly found works "prove" that Shakespeare was not a secret Catholic. Those clerics are described as owning a black foundling boy, a former slave, who they molest every night. It's a dumb, unnecessary detail -- as neither the clerics nor the boy appear again in the book. So why does the author go out of his way to make those insults?
The Lambs of London (Sound Library) ebook
Author:
Alex Jennings,Peter Ackroyd
Category:
Genre Fiction
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1407 kb
FB2 size:
1360 kb
DJVU size:
1446 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Blackstone Pub; Unabridged edition (June 1, 2006)
Rating:
4.5
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