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City ebook

by Clifford D. Simak


Nine tales of imagination and wonder from one of the formative voices of science fiction and fantasy, the author of Way Station and City. Named a Grand Master by the Science Fiction Writers of America, Clifford D. Simak was a preeminent voice during the decades that established sci-fi as a genre to be reckoned with. Held in the same esteem as fellow luminaries Isaac Asimov, Robert A. Heinlein, and Ray Bradbury, his novels continue to enthrall today’s readers.

Clifford Donald Simak (/ˈsɪmək/; August 3, 1904 – April 25, 1988) was an American science fiction writer. He won three Hugo Awards and one Nebula Award. The Science Fiction Writers of America made him its third SFWA Grand Master, and the Horror Writers Association made him one of three inaugural winners of the Bram Stoker Award for Lifetime Achievement. Simak was born in Millville, Wisconsin in 1904, son of John Lewis and Margaret (Wiseman) Simak

Cemetery World Clifford D. Simak Chapter 1 The Cemetery stretched away in the morning light, a thing of breathless beauty. The rows of gleaming monuments swept across the valley and.

Cemetery World Clifford D. Chapter 1. The Cemetery stretched away in the morning light, a thing of breathless beauty.

City by Clifford D. Simak is a collection of science fiction stories that were originally published separately between . Simak was best known for the book City, a reaction to the horrors of World War II, and for his novel Way Station. Simak is a collection of science fiction stories that were originally published separately between 1944 and 1951, along with brief notes on each of the stories. In 1953 City was awarded the International Fantasy Award, and in following years, Simak won three Hugo Awards and a Nebula Award.

Читать бесплатно City Clifford D. Simak. Clifford D. Simak City. These are the stories that the Dogs tell when the fires burn high and the wind is from the north.

Simak was best known for the book City, a reaction to the horrors of World War II, and for his novel Way Station. Simak’s novel Way Station, published in 1963, won the Hugo Award for that year’s best science fiction novel and has been recognized on various all-time greatest lists of sci-fi books. Simak, a Science Fiction Writers of America Grand Master, is an author whose work is consistently exceptional and rarely disappoints.

That City by Clifford D. Simak is a fix up, or in other words a group of short stories that are connected to form a novel.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. Simak Clifford D. Категория: Научная Фантастика.

Clifford D. These are the stories that the Dogs tell when the fires burn high and the wind is from the north

Clifford D. Then each family circle gathers at the hearthstone and the pups sit silently and listen and when the story's done they ask many questions: "What is Man?" they'll ask. Or perhaps: "What is a city?" Or "What is a war?" There is no positive answer to any of these questions. There are suppositions and there are theories and there are many educated guesses, but there are no answers.

On a far future Earth, mankind's achievements are immense: artificially intelligent robots, genetically uplifted animals, interplanetary travel, genetic modification of the human form itself. But nothing comes without a cost. Humanity is tired, its vigour all but gone. Society is breaking down into smaller communities, dispersing into the countryside and abandoning the great cities of the world. As the human race dwindles and declines, which of its great creations will inherit the Earth? And which will claim the stars ...?
Mori
I've been reading sic-fi for almost 40 years and here I found concepts I have never seen before. I'm not a fan of short stories--I like a wide, deep, rich world to lose myself in--and this delivered that even though it is made up of separate short stories. The stories are linked through one family, one home and, for the most part, one robot who has never heard of Asimov.

Almost every story ended with my closing the Kindle and uttering, "Wow" to myself. I was constantly surprised, caught off-guard, and left contemplating the new direction the author took me. There are also moral issues to contemplate with many of the stories: if you could have paradise, would you grab it at the expense of your human form? If mankind was standing in the way of forward progress for another species and the whole planet, would you make sure the planet had it's chance?

I'm so glad I bought this book and discovered this classic sic-fi author. I can see re-reading this book many times in the future.
Shakanos
Many years ago, I found science fiction and the writings of Clifford D. Simak. A true Grand Master, not merely of science fiction writing, Simak was a keen observer and a deep thinker. City is a classic, as To Kill a Mockingbird or the plays of Shakespeare and the books of Dickens are. Young people in school may find Shakespeare and friends a bit dense for easy reading, but Simak was a plain-spoken man. His writings are accessible, and his deeper subtexts draw one back through the years to read again, to enjoy the stories and to reach deeper each time to discover how relevant a book like City is to our time. There is no need to wax all prosy and drop into academic/literary critic mode. Simak wrote great stories and books, the kind that resonate in the back of memory and call out to be read again. This book is just that damn good. Anyone who can read needs to read City.
I love Mercedes
There are the stories that the Dogs tell when the fires burn high and he wind is from the north. Then each family gathers at the hearthstone and the pups sit silently and listen and when the story’s done they ask many questions.
“What is Man” they’ll ask.
Or perhaps: “What is a city?”
Or: “What is a war?”

That opening grabbed me when I was in my early teens. It grabbed me again a couple of days ago. The opening of Clifford D. Simak’s science fiction masterpiece, City. It had just been published in 1952, although the 8 stories had been appearing in magazines as far back as 1943. The opening is the doggie editor’s preface to a later collection of what fragments remain from the old tales. Each of the tales is prefaced by notes analyzing and commenting on historical and critical commentary on the tales. This framework is both charming and brilliant. A 9th story, “Epilog,” was added some 22 years later, this time prefaced not by the doggie editor’s notes but by Simak’s own explanation. As nearly perfect as the original was, this addition, in my opinion, makes it even better. Simak says, “For myself, there is a certain note of finality and sadness in the story that I would have been willing not to touch upon.” To me, that finality and sadness are wonderful. The story does bring the robot Jenkins back for a final bit of musing, and somehow it rounds off the work both thematically and artistically.
It is wonderful in one’s latter years to visit something that enchanted in one’s youth and to discover that it still enchants.
Fordredor
This probably Simak's finest work, which is high praise indeed. One may quibble with his founding premise -- the demise of the city as a human 'huddling place' -- and the tech looks dated decades later. But Simak has produced a multithreaded look at what it means to be human vs what it means to be sentient. Men, dogs, Martians, lopers, mutants, robots, ants, cobblies, and various animals all appear, interact, and influence each other. As an added bonus, the inter-story commentaries are a wonderfully pointed poke at actual scholarly commentary on ancient human texts and myths. Highly recommended.
City ebook
Author:
Clifford D. Simak
Category:
Genre Fiction
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1135 kb
FB2 size:
1109 kb
DJVU size:
1424 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Ace (January 15, 1984)
Rating:
4.1
Other formats:
mobi mbr lit lrf
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