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Rebels of Babylon: A Novel (Abel Jones Mysteries) ebook

by Owen Parry


Rebels of Babylon book .

Rebels of Babylon book. New Orleans, 1863 - occupied and impoverished, yet defiant. And Civil War detective Abel Jones, arriving to investigate the death of a young crusader, finds himself facing fantastic rumors of the resurrected dead as the city approaches riot and hysteria. It appears that Parry never wrote another Abel Jones mystery and that's OK with me. He wraps everything up quite neatly in this fifth book, sending Abel home to his wife and his business ventures, sick and tired of the brutality of war. Like him, I don't know if I could read another one.

Rebels of Babylon : A Novel. Book in the Abel Jones Series). When a Yankee heiress is murdered in Civil War-era, Union-occupied New Orleans, prim Methodist detective Abel Jones launches an investigation that takes him from the French Quarter alleys, to nearby plantations, to the local bayous, in a case that is complicated by regional superstition. 30,000 first printing.

Rebels of Babylon A Novel Abel Jones Mysteries.

Rebels of Babylon is the dark and rich sixth adventure in the Abel Jones mystery series - winner of the prestigious .

Rebels of Babylon is the dark and rich sixth adventure in the Abel Jones mystery series - winner of the prestigious Hammett and Herodotus awards. From the tour de force mayhem of its opening scene to its stunning climax, Owen Parry's latest novel pays tribute to the great literary traditions of New Orleans, a city that knows how to keep its secrets.

Owen Parry has done it again. This Civil War murder mystery, the third in a series, moves Abel Jones, wounded veteran of Bull Run and reluctant detective, into a new venue - the Deep South. The first tale took us through the dark corridors of corruption in Washington, DC, and the second unearthed a grisly Fenian plot in up-state New York.

REBELS OF BABYLON Owen Parry Ralph Peters STACKPOLE BOOKS Books by. .But Abel Jones is not a quitting man. The negress plunged through the multitude

REBELS OF BABYLON Owen Parry Ralph Peters STACKPOLE BOOKS Books by Ralph Peters Nonfiction Lines of Fire Endless War Looking for Trouble Wars of Blood an. The negress plunged through the multitude. I followed as swiftly as my thankless leg allowed, struggling to hurry along in her wake before it closed up again.

Even though he had worn the enemy’s gray. Lieutenant Raines, whom I had met in the course of a foul affair in Mississippi, was a splendid lad confounded by the times. Lieutenant Raines, whom I had met in the course of a foul affair in Mississippi, was a splendid lad confounded by the times as, and unlucky in love. A softly handsome boy, his charm was the sort that wins the girl, but loses the woman. Francis Drake Raines was an innocent-although he had killed other men in battle-and, truth be told, the ladies like a leavening of danger in their sweethearts

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American Civil War (1861-1865), Jones, Abel (Fictitious character), Government investigators, Irish Americans, Welsh Americans, Government investigators, Irish Americans, Jones, Abel (Fictitious character), Welsh Americans. New York : HarperTorch.

When a Yankee heiress is murdered in Civil War-era, Union-occupied New Orleans, prim Methodist detective Abel Jones launches an investigation that takes him from the French Quarter alleys, to nearby plantations, to the local bayous, in a case that is complicated by regional superstition. 30,000 first printing.
Hirah
This is an awesome historical novel series. They are a wonderful mix of war action story, mystery, espionage, and gothic horror. The author skillfully mixes all those elements in such a way that they rarely intrude on another. One thing I appreciate is that while the author is somewhat liberal, he refuses to pander to PC notions through his characters. This is a common irritation in numerous historical novels where an author, either to satisfy modern reader sentiment or their own, twist their main characters to mimic attitudes and beliefs alien to the time they live in. In this series author ensures the characters maintain unapologetic attitudes and opinions in common with the Civil War era - Abolitionist self-righteousness, racism, sexism, classism and other tawdry "isms". Warning: this includes liberal use of the "N" word and uncomplementary views of the Irish and occasionally everybody else. There is also graphic violence and, though narrated by the puritanical protagonist, somewhat graphic sex. There is also an unapologetic inclusion of Christianity. Another mistake historical novels often have is the complete exclusion of religion. Even though only in the last 100 years has religion been somewhat eclipsed by other human activities. It's not used in the story to preach but in historical context that will please and horrify Christians and atheists in turn.
Jogas
The fly leaf of Rebels of Babylon refers to the opening scene as a "tour de force of mayhem." Certainly, Owen Parry is an excellent action writer, but his real forte is characterization. There is no more well-rounded character in American mystery writing than Abel Jones.

Jones is a staunch Methodist, who reads his Bible every day, when he's not chasing voodoo priestesses through the streets of New Orleans. He's also equally dismissive of just about every nationality other than the Welsh. Jones's blind spots set him up for a lot of introspection as the plot winds toward its climax.

In this sixth number in the series, Jones is sent to New Orleans to investigate the murder of abolitionist Susan Peabody who was involved in a "Back-to-Africa" scheme, having invested over $150,000 of her own money. Jones is aided in the endeavor by Mr. Barnaby, a character first introduced in CALL EACH RIVER JORDAN. All of the other familiar minor characters are mentioned only referentially.

I didn't care much for the plot. Let it suffice to say that there's a lot of B-movie voodoo involved. At one point a lamb is skinned alive by a voodoo zombie, and in the same scene Jones participates in a voodoo mass. The voodoo participants seem to be both good and bad, and I never was able to figure out what their motivation was.

Plot is never the point in one of Parry's Civil War mysteries. A blurb in the back of the book refers to Abel T. Jones as "a character with a voice nearly the equal, in originality, of Twain's immortal Huck Finn." Listen to this: "I leaped like an Irish girl at the sound of the fiddle." Another character is bleeding "like an Irishman's `eart at the sight of an empty bottle." When he is confronted with a voodoo chant, Jones says the chant did not "resemble anything Charles Wesley wrote." Most often the joke is on Abel Jones and that makes it okay when he's overzealous about his religion or makes sport of the French. An Irish cab driver refers to Jones as a runt with "that low, Welsh look." You don't find these treasures once or twice in a book; they're on every other page. Perhaps the funniest scene in the whole book is when General Banks reads Jones the riot act. Because of the mayhem at the beginning of the book, Banks thinks Jones is a total screw-up, just the opposite of the way Jones sees himself.

Throughout the book, Jones is complaining about how much he wants to resign his commission and return to his expectant wife, Mary Myfanwy, and their two children in Pottsville, Pennsylvania. This subplot comes to a head in the epilogue when Jones reports to Henry Seward. That's another staple in the Abel Jones series. We're always introduced to a historical figure or two along the way. Again Jones is confronted by an entirely different perception of his personality. Seward thinks Jones would make an excellent politician.
Banal
The setting is New Orleans and from the beginning for almost 2/3 of the book it was one weird, bizarre tale after another. Jones is buried alive; takes a bath with a large snake; and is part of a voodoo ritual. It was almost too much even with Mr. Barnaby B. Barnaby's help, but let that bide. Finally, about 2/3 the way into the book there is light, fresh air, and some clarity. Able Jones comes through and does what he is known for doing, that is solving complex cases where the odds and sometimes the authorities are against him.
Nargas
I'm a huge fan of this series and I wish there were more of them. This book opens with a wonderful chase scene that goes on and on and the reader doesn't get to catch their breath for quite a long time. Abel goes from one scrape directly into another, and another, and another. I just loved it. The author has a wonderful talent and I sure hope he will write more about Abel Jones.

The first book in this series was, no doubt, the tamest one, but still very good.
Ces
This is a marvelous read, and those already familiar with the Abel Jones series will not be disappointed. Again, I am amazed and appreciative of the amount of research that Mr. Parry puts into his novels, and this book is a prime example. It is a wonderful story that not only entertains, but also enlightens about one of the most important eras in our history, and, one of the most important cities and cultures (New Orleans) in our country. I couldn't put it down and read it all in one sitting. Thank again to the author, and I look forward to reading about how the venerable Abel Jones will come to grips with his latest personal struggle regarding family over duty!
Hallolan
If you are interested in civil war history, this detective series is a wonderfully entertaining way to learn more. The novels are action packed and top flight mysteries.
one life
Like most of Owen Parry's Civil War era novels, this one engrossed me from start to finish, especially with its sense of capturing the "oeuvre" of the City of New Orleans during that tumultuous era of its history. Certainly worth the read, if one enjoys this type of Civil War era historical novel.
The New Orleans backdrop gave this installment a different feel than other Abel Jones mysteries, but while it was a little different in feeling and tone, it was no less a spellbinding story! Owen Parry always has something interesting and exciting to tell you an entertain you with in his books! LOVE THEM!
Rebels of Babylon: A Novel (Abel Jones Mysteries) ebook
Author:
Owen Parry
Category:
Genre Fiction
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1606 kb
FB2 size:
1129 kb
DJVU size:
1335 kb
Language:
Publisher:
William Morrow; 1 edition (March 1, 2005)
Pages:
320 pages
Rating:
4.7
Other formats:
mbr docx azw txt
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