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Eve: A Novel ebook

by Elissa Elliott


Eve is a beautiful novel, richly imagined. Elissa Elliott has written about Eve in such a new way, and by exploring her heart, conflicts, desires, and choices, she illuminates our own. I loved the intimate tone, and although I know how the story goes, I found myself reading on the edge of my seat.

Eve is a beautiful novel, richly imagined. This novel is irresistible, and if it were an apple, I would have to eat it. -New York Times bestselling author Luanne Rice. Eve is an enchanting novel, rich with emotion and power. Elliott's masterful prose brilliantly brings an ancient world to vibrant life.

In this mesmerizing debut novel, Elissa Elliott blends biblical tradition with recorded history to put a powerful new twist on the story of creation’s first family. Here is Eve brought to life in a way religion and myth have never allowed–as a wife, a mother, and a woman. With stunning intimacy, Elliott boldly reimagines Eve’s journey before and after the banishment from Eden, her complex marriage to Adam, her troubled relationship with her daughters, and the tragedy that would overcome her sons, Cain and Abel.

In this mesmerizing debut novel, Elissa Elliott blends biblical tradition with recorded history to put a powerful new twist on the story of creation’s first family

In this mesmerizing debut novel, Elissa Elliott blends biblical tradition with recorded history to put a powerful new twist on the story of creation’s first family.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. In this mesmerizing debut novel, Elissa Elliott blends biblical tradition with recorded history to put a powerful new twist on the story of creation’s first family.

A reimagining of one of the world’s oldest tales, Eve and three of her daughters narrate the events of that fateful summer leading up to Cain’s murder of Abel. Oh, and to tell a reader-worthy story. On this last, beautiful day of 2011, I’m saying goodbye to you, my dear readers, for a while. There’s a book to be written. There are personal assessments to be done.

Последние твиты от Elissa Elliott (saElliott). Hello, sweet friends

Последние твиты от Elissa Elliott (saElliott). Author of Eve: A Novel, blogger & podcaster at Living the Questions, mother, reader, cook, traveler, questioner, eater of chocolate. Hello, sweet friends. go! 0 ответов 3 ретвитов 1 отметка Нравится.

Back six, from left to right: Beverly Northouse, Jenny Korsmo, Deb Jacobson, Elissa Elliott, Cathie Armstrong, Carolyn Karsell; Middle row three, from left to right: Cindy Heins, Marcie Becker, Francine Ekstam; Front two kneeling, from left to right: Betty Danielson, Pam Rotty. Eve: A Novel of the First Woman.

About Eve. In this mesmerizing debut novel, Elissa Elliott blends biblical tradition with recorded history to put a. .Elissa Elliott is a former high school teacher. She is a contributing writer to Books & Culture and has optioned her first screenplay

About Eve. She is a contributing writer to Books & Culture and has optioned her first screenplay. She and her husband, Daniel Elliott, live in Minnesota. This is her first novel. About Elissa Elliott.

In this mesmerizing debut novel, Elissa Elliott blends biblical tradition with recorded history to put a powerful new twist on the story of creation's first family. Here is Eve brought to life in a way religion and myth have never allowed-as a wife, a mother, and a woman.

Read online books written by Elissa Elliott in our e-reader absolutely for free. Author of Eve at ReadAnyBook.

In this mesmerizing debut novel, Elissa Elliott blends biblical tradition with recorded history to put a powerful new twist on the story of creation’s first family. Here is Eve brought to life in a way religion and myth have never allowed–as a wife, a mother, and a woman. With stunning intimacy, Elliott boldly reimagines Eve’s journey before and after the banishment from Eden, her complex marriage to Adam, her troubled relationship with her daughters, and the tragedy that would overcome her sons, Cain and Abel. From a woman’s first awakening to a mother’s innermost hopes and fears, from moments of exquisite tenderness to a climax of shocking violence, Eveexplores the very essence of love, womanhood, faith, and humanity.
Xmatarryto
Eve and Adam love their life in the Garden of Eden. However, paradise is lost when Eve seduced by Lucifer as much as by her curiosity persuades Adam to take an apple bite from the Tree of Knowledge forbidden fruit. Saddened but a believer in the original tough love, Elohim kicks the pair from the Garden and into the harsh cruel world.

Over the next few years, the previously pampered pair struggle, but finally turn it around as their home becomes a safe haven to raise kids and drink beer with figs and grapes. They have several children as Adam believes in barefoot and pregnant. Abel is a sheepherder; Cain becomes a farmer, Seth the favorite provides solace to his mom; Naava is a weaver; Dara is a potter; and Aya the healer remains invisible to her family. Cain turns away from Elohim to the Sumerian fertility goddess Inanna while his sister Naava seduces him into taking her to the nearby city. Naava is jealous that Dara works for the prince, so she marries the prince. Outraged by her betrayal Cain causes a riot that displaces the first family and soon commits fratricide.

This dysfunctional family drama makes for an enjoyable biblical biographical fiction in which they needed a shrink. The story line leaps around as perspective is rotated. Eve grows in her job as the first mom after being kicked to the curb by God due to the original sin. Her daughters even "invisible" Aya come across as fully developed in part because they tell the saga while the males are not fleshed out beyond their roles of supporting the women who dominate their lives. Although except for the setting, the First family feels like an American brood sent back to the first days, fans will enjoy the novelization of Eve and her clan.

Harriet Klausner
Umrdana
The story of the world's first couple - Adam and Eve - appears so early in the Bible that anyone attempting to read through God's word for themselves gets at least that far. Indeed as a child, I never succeeded in reading through the entire Bible, the Old Testament books of history and genealogy were too dry for me to plow through at that age. However, I did succeed in reading through Genesis on a number of occasions as I took up the goal once again. It's all over in the first four chapters, chapter five lists the genealogy from Noah until Adam and the next stop is the flood.

Over the past year two authors have tackled Eve's perceptions of her life from first awakening to the fall and beyond. Tosca Lee released Havah: The Story of Eve in October of 2008, and this month Elissa Elliott debut's her first novel, Eve: A Novel of the First Woman. Though very little is said in scripture about the first woman and her offspring, she remains a figure of great allure. Being the mother of all living it's no surprise that she continues to garner such detailed attention. I certainly couldn't resist the opportunity to examine the first woman from a new angle by reading Eve.

Elliott's re-imagination of Eve's life is told through the eyes of three of her daughters and Eve herself; all in first person excepting the account of one daughter. Eve herself twines the threads of story together as her daughters visit with her on her death bed. Sharing their remembrances, their struggles and differences, their memories. All four women look back in time to the summer when Cain killed Abel, a deeply painful and life changing time for the family. Eve's narrative moves between that summer, her time in the garden, and their early years as a family. Each voice is distinctive, particularly those of Aya, Eve's crippled daughter, and Dara, her little girl.

The lush, rich writing of this new author entranced me. Eagerly, I gobbled up the first several chapters until serious flaws emerged that would have had me abandoning the book if I wasn't bound to review it.

When an author lifts characters from the pages of scripture their lives often have large gaps, which the writer then fleshes in with cultural detail, imagined challenges, surroundings and details. To my mind, the information that is clear and present about the character in the Bible should be incorporated as carefully as possible, building a firm foundation upon which to add the flesh of the tale. It's true that Elliott presents her work more as literary fiction than biblical fiction, but when we're dealing with scripture, shifting the titles' designation does little to alter my personal standards. Unfortunately the skeleton upon which Elliot sets her evocative story is weak and wobbly, agreeing neither with scripture nor within itself.

While it isn't within the scope of this review to point out each event in scripture that was not included or was misrepresented, a brief sampling follows. Eve did not receive her own name until after the fall; prior to that she and Adam were both called Adam. In the novel Eve experiences guilt both before and after eating the fruit of knowledge of good and evil; obviously this just doesn't work. Simple explanations from scripture are bypassed in favour of complex imaginings from scholars as on the topic of conjugal relations between Eve and her husband. The Bible says that Adam knew her after they left the garden; based on the conjecture and traditions of others rather than the Word of God, Elliot shows this intimate act occurring prior to their expulsion.

Several other minor discrepancies are easily noted by those who will read the Genesis account carefully for themselves. However the deal-breaker was when the first couple encountered a pre-existing Sumerian society with a population much larger and technologies far further advanced than their own. In her footnotes Elliott notes Cain's fear that those who found him would seek to destroy him after his murder of Abel was discovered. Based upon this fear she then goes on to imagine another group of people, though where these people came from is beyond anyone's understanding and indeed, is not explained within the novel itself, though Eve wonders where they fit in as well.

Unfortunately this is the Scopes "Monkey Trial" all over again. Adam and Eve had many children, their grand-children and great-grandchildren would soon represent a sizable group of people. Rather than accepting the simplest answer, Elliott introduces this misplaced group to lend additional conflict, tension and spiritual uncertainty into the lives of her characters.

The deep doctrinal discrepancies, the addition of other people into this period of human history brings, is addressed nowhere in the author's afterword, where she explains some of the decisions she made in the novel. Romans 5 tells us that death did not enter the world until Adam sinned, and this group had clearly been breeding and dying for some time prior to encountering Adam, Eve and their children. I could go on, but I'll limit myself here.

Without doubt Elliott is a strikingly talented new voice, creating emotionally gripping scenes, internal struggles and makes lavish use of rich descriptions. Her writing I love; her story I loathe.
digytal soul
"Eve" is a retelling of the story of Adam & Eve, tracing their time together in the Garden, their fall, and their life thereafter. It is told through the eyes of Eve, as well as her three daughters, Naava, Aya, and Dara. Eve's story is told largely in retrospect, while her daughters collectively tell the family's story beginning at a later date, beginning around the time the family encounters an encroaching civilization, one that is polytheistic at that.

I was concerned that "Eve" was going to be poorly written, when on the first page I read a line that sounded as though it were penned by Yoda. I get that sentence structure might have been a bit different in the days of yore, but jumbling word order up (inconsistently as well, since thankfully the whole book isn't written in this way) isn't really an effective way to make your language sound appropriately dated. I decided to push forward. Maybe that first part was just a shaky start, but she'd stick the landing? By and large the prose was serviceable, but there were parts that were awkward and even bits that were downright embarrassing. There wasn't an abundance of sex in what I read (just two short snippets), but at one point Elliott does write that as Adam positions his [...] before her it "had grown, like a roll of warm bread".

Awkward writing aside, I just didn't think this book was very good. Obviously the author is taking liberties with the story of Adam & Eve, which is totally fine with me since I'm not religious, and I tend to enjoy biblical retellings, provided they are done well. This, however, read like a sudsy soap opera dressed up as historical fiction. It's pretty trashy and feels inconsequential, and while I respect the authors stance on questioning faith and belief, this just doesn't have much heft to it.

Ultimately, I couldn't finish this book (though I made it about halfway, which I think is enough to give a fair review of the novel's style, prose, and tone). I think that "Eve" amounts to little more than a guilty pleasure read, so when I didn't find it pleasurable, what was the point in sticking with it? The dialogue didn't ring true to me, since it really felt as though modern-day people had just been transported to Mesopotamia. I found the book never felt authentic, and every plot point felt gimmicky and like a telenovella twist. Six-year olds speaking like adults? Eve giving birth to a premature still-born while walking through the woods with Adam after having just survived a bear attack? Five-year olds cooking meals with the aplomb of a Top Chef and commandeering home births? Poisoning your mother with hemlock? Do you see what I'm getting at? Some people might find this stuff riveting, but it's pap and literary dross, and I was bored by it. I could see reading this mindlessly on a beach, but you know what? It's January, and it's 2°F outside, and I don't even know of a swimming pool I could go to.

I do think this book will be enjoyed by certain readers, but I am clearly not its target audience. The writing made my cheeks flame with second-degree embarrassment at times, and the plot was outlandish. I could forgive neither, and got little enjoyment from either to boot, so I decided to stop at the halfway point rather than chugging through the 400+ pages. If you think this book will be moving and reminiscent of Anita Diamant's The Red Tent, run, don't walk, away from this book.
Eve: A Novel ebook
Author:
Elissa Elliott
Category:
Genre Fiction
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1329 kb
FB2 size:
1695 kb
DJVU size:
1129 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Bantam (December 29, 2009)
Pages:
448 pages
Rating:
4.1
Other formats:
rtf mobi doc txt
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