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Paradise Reconsidered: Toni Morrison's (Hi)stories and Truths (FORECAAST) ebook

by Justine Tally


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Paradise Reconsidered book. In this first book-length study of Paradise, Justine Tally securely.

Justine Tally is a professor of American literature at the University of La Laguna. She is author of "Paradise Reconsidered: Toni Morrison's (Hi)stories and Truths; The Story of Jazz: Toni Morrison's Dialogic Imagination"; and "Toni Morrison's "Beloved": Origins".

Author of The Cambridge Companion to Toni Morrison, Toni Morrison's 'Beloved', Mapping African America, Paradise Reconsidered, Toni Morrison's A Mercy, The story of jazz .

Author of The Cambridge Companion to Toni Morrison, Toni Morrison's 'Beloved', Mapping African America, Paradise Reconsidered, Toni Morrison's A Mercy, The story of jazz: Toni Morrisonþs dialog imagination, The story of Jazz, The Cambridge companion to Toni Morrison. Showing all works by author. Would you like to see only ebooks? The Cambridge Companion to Toni Morrison.

Tally, Justine Paradise Reconsidered: Toni Morrison's (Hi)stories and Truths (FORECAAST). ISBN 13: 9783825842048. Paradise Reconsidered: Toni Morrison's (Hi)stories and Truths (FORECAAST).

Paradise Reconsidered. Toni Morison's Paradise. Select Format: Paperback. ISBN13:9783825842048. Release Date:August 1999.

She is author of Paradise Reconsidered: Toni Morrison’s (Hi)stories and Truths; The Story of Jazz: Toni . Laptops and Computers. You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser. eReaders and other devices.

She is author of Paradise Reconsidered: Toni Morrison’s (Hi)stories and Truths; The Story of Jazz: Toni Morrison’s Dialogic Imagination; and Toni Morrison’s Beloved : Origins. To read on E Ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device.

Justine Tally is Professor of American Literature at the University of La Laguna, where she specializes in African American literature. Her books include Paradise Reconsidered: Toni Morrison's (Hi)stories and Truths (1999) and The Story of Jazz: Toni Morrison's Dialogic Imagination (2001), and The Cambridge Companion to Toni Morrison (Ed. 2007).

She is author of Paradise Reconsidered: Toni Morrison’s (Hi)stories and Truths (Lit Verlag, 1999), The Story of Jazz .

She is author of Paradise Reconsidered: Toni Morrison’s (Hi)stories and Truths (Lit Verlag, 1999), The Story of Jazz: Toni Morrison’s Dialogic Imagination (Lit Verlag, 2001), and Toni Morrison’s Beloved: Origins (Routledge, 2009). Justine Tally is Professor of American Literature at the University of La Laguna (recently retired) where she has specialized in African American Literature and Culture. She is author of Paradise Reconsidered: Toni Morrison’s (Hi)stories and Truths (Lit Verlag, 1999), The Story of Jazz: Toni Morrison’s Dialogic Imagination (Lit Verlag, 2001), and Toni Morrison’s Beloved: Origins (Routledge, 2009).

Paradise is a 1997 novel by Toni Morrison, and her first since winning the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1993. According to the author, Paradise completes a "trilogy" that begins with Beloved (1987) and includes Jazz (1992)

Paradise is a 1997 novel by Toni Morrison, and her first since winning the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1993. According to the author, Paradise completes a "trilogy" that begins with Beloved (1987) and includes Jazz (1992). Paradise was chosen as an Oprah's Book Club selection for January 1998.

Reading and insight in Toni Morrison's Paradise. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Kujawa-Holbrook, S. (2009). News & World Report, January 19, 71 in J. Tally, Paradise reconsidered: Toni Morrison's (hi)stories and truths (p. 16). Hamburg, Germany: Forum for European Contributions to African American Studies, Vol. oogle Scholar.

" Toni Morison's Paradise
Fararala
Justine Tally's richly textured analysis of Toni Morrison's Paradise (1998) offers to both specialists in literary studies and scholars from other disciplines a clear and highly insightful introduction to that most complicated of Morrison's texts. Paradise Reconsidered: Toni Morrison's (Hi)stories and Truths places the novel within the larger context of Morrison's concerns with language and narrative strategy as well her wide reading in African American history and lore. Indeed, as Tally makes clear, Paradise constitutes the final part of a trilogy: "Whereas Beloved [1987] focuses on the role of memory, and Jazz [1991] is centered around the development of story, Paradise is devoted to the cultural production of History/history and its unstable relationship to both memory and story." (p. 14)
Tally's impressive survey of text and context provides a brief but illuminating account of the publishing history of the Morrison trilogy. Additionally, it looks at the novels in light of the author's literary, social and cultural criticism, especially Morrison's challenge to the what has been considered canonical in U. S. literature found in Playing in the Dark: Whiteness and the Literary Imagination (1992). The analysis of the text itself elaborates on themes presented by other literary theorists. Tally draws upon theorists such as Walter Benjamin and Walter Ong, and at the same time addresses the questions raised by African American scholars such as Trudier Harris and Henry Louis Gates, Jr. But it is her own reading of the text and its meanings that stand out. She qualifies, or modifies, the notion of "magic realism," using Morrison's own objections as well as her own understanding of the theme and ultimately offers the phrase "psychic realism" as a more precise alternative. Tally goes through the vast number of characters in Paradise and nicely unravels the complicated web of relationships, plot turns, and narrative strategies that make Morrison's text difficult as well as exciting. Tally also gives us clues about some matters that Morrison leaves ambiguous or unexplained. Who among the occupants in the convent was the lone white girl? How do we understand the 'reappearances' of characters that we had thought were killed?
Tally highlights issues of gender and color in Morrison's texts, carefully assessing Paradise from its key first sentence, "They shoot the white girl first," through the layered stories of the women in the Convent and the population of Ruby, Oklahoma. The founding of the town by "8-rock" black families(the reference is to a mining term and the color of coal) is central to the text, but so is the subtly changing historical interpretation of the town's origins, as perceived by various newcomers. In attending to changing beliefs across generations, from the Reconstruction era to the aftermath of the Vietnam War, Tally also provides a chronological guide--as Morrison seems to do--to shifting modes of race-consciousness among African Americans. This is accomplished both through minute readings of the text and through expansive sections, such as those concerning Religious Ideology as Narrative Strategy and the meanings of feminism and racial "essentialism" in Morrison's novels.
The interdisciplinary nature of Tally's examination of Morrison sets it apart from many other readings. Tally surveys the literary aspects of Paradise with precision, but she also sees Morrison's writing as part of a larger pattern of African American culture and consciousness. The black Exodus to Oklahoma and other places in the 1880s already has its historians. But how Morrison has rendered these "matters of fact," and how Tally discusses history and memory and storytelling add richness to the other accounts. Tally writes with enormous insight. Other scholars will need to read her appraisals in order to advance their own interpretations of Morrison's cultural contributions.
Patrick B. Miller Department of History Northeastern Illinois University Chicago, Illinois
Bulace
Justine Tally's brief and insightful study of Toni Morrison's Paradise (1998) is provocative and multi-dimensional. It usefully situates the novel in relation to Morrison's oeuvre especially to Jazz (1992) and Beloved (1987) the two earlier novels in her trilogy about post-emancipation African American culture and society and to Morrison's own critical writing which suffuses her discussion. This makes the book as much a summary of where Morrison has taken us to at century's end as a specific critique of her latest novel. There is a welcome use of Morrison scholarship from Europe, too often ignored by Morrisonians in America, although there are some surprising Stateside ommissions. Philip Price's wonderful Dangerous Freedom (1997) is not cited and Jill Matus's Toni Morrison (1998) with its interesting work on trauma which could have illuminated aspects of the discussion here is ignored (too late to use?). Meanwhile, Linden Peach's rather derivative discussions - in Toni Morrison (1995) - are afforded too much space. As would be expected considering the novel's recent provenance, there is much use of newspaper and magazine reviews that Tally skilfully uses to show the often narrow nature of their concern with Morrison and their inability to deal with the complexity of a difficult novel. Tally astutely foregrounds "History" in its numerous guises as key to a discussion of Paradise giving the reader useful contextualisation and yet showing the limitations of a traditional literary historical approach to such a demanding postmodern novel. Most interestingly she discusses how important arguments about essentialism are to understanding this novel, making what is often an arcane discussion, clearcut and stimulating. Morrison is often accused of being difficult, Tally's clearly written and sensitively argued monograph supplies some dynamic answers to these postmodern puzzles.
Whitegrove
Paradise Reconsidered is an elegantly written and tightly argued analysis of concepts of history, memory and narrative in Toni Morrison's Paradise. This will be an invaluable teaching resource for those of us who have included Paradise in our course lists, given not only Tally's knowledge of the field of African-American literature but also her ability to discuss complex concepts in lucid intelligible language.
Paradise Reconsidered: Toni Morrison's (Hi)stories and Truths (FORECAAST) ebook
Author:
Justine Tally
Category:
History & Criticism
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1996 kb
FB2 size:
1531 kb
DJVU size:
1750 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Lit Verlag (March 17, 1999)
Pages:
112 pages
Rating:
4.8
Other formats:
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