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Were You Always an Italian?: Ancestors and Other Icons of Italian America ebook

by Maria Laurino


Maria Laurino is the author of Were You Always an Italian?, a national bestseller, and Old World Daughter, New World . The title of Maria Laurino's book of essays addresses just this issue

Maria Laurino is the author of Were You Always an Italian?, a national bestseller, and Old World Daughter, New World Mother. The title of Maria Laurino's book of essays addresses just this issue.

In the US, being an Italian American was a hybrid of the two cultures and the I enjoyed this book very much.

Laurino was exploring the governor's ethnic roots, yet only a few years earlier she had contemplated chopping the vowels . Maria Laurino is the author of Were You Always an Italian?, a national bestseller, and Old World Daughter, New World Mother

Laurino was exploring the governor's ethnic roots, yet only a few years earlier she had contemplated chopping the vowels off the end of her name. Mixing memoir, social and cultural history, and reporting, Laurino sifts through the stereotypes bedeviling Italian-Americans. With a sympathetic but clear eye, she writes about guidos, bimbettes, and mammoni (mama's boys in Italy). Maria Laurino is the author of Were You Always an Italian?, a national bestseller, and Old World Daughter, New World Mother. She lives in New York City with her husband and son.

Books related to Were You Always an Italian?

With "intelligence and honesty" (Arizona Republic), she writes about guidos, bimbettes, and mammoni (mama's boys in Italy); examines the clashing aesthetics of Giorgio Armani and Gianni Versace; and unravels the etymology of southern Italian dialect words like gavone and bubidabetz. According to Frances Mayes, she navigates the conflicting forces of ethnicity "with humor and wisdom. Books related to Were You Always an Italian?: Ancestors and Other Icons of Italian America.

With "intelligence and honesty" (Arizona Republic), she writes about guidos, bimbettes, and mammoni (mama's boys in Italy); examines the clashing aesthetics of Giorgio Armani and Gianni Versace; and unravels the etymology of southern Italian dialect words like gavone and bubidabetz. To ensure we are able to help you as best we can, please include your reference number: VARP7NVLZW.

Ancestors and Other Icons of Italian America. Maria Laurino is the author of Were You Always an Italian?, a national bestseller. The Italian Americans: A History. Old World Daughter, New World Mother: An Education in Love and Freedom.

The Italian Americans: A History – e-kirja kirjailijoilta Maria Laurino. Ancestors and Other Icons of Italian America. Lue tämä kirja käyttämällä Google Play Kirjat ‑sovellusta tietokoneella tai Android- tai iOS-laitteella. Lataa offline-lukemista varten, korosta, lisää kirjanmerkkeihin tai kirjoita muistiinpanoja lukiessasi kohdetta The Italian Americans: A History. Lisätietoja.

May be you will be interested in other books by Maria Laurino: Were You Always an Italian? .

May be you will be interested in other books by Maria Laurino: Were You Always an Italian?: Ancestors and Other Icons of Italian America by Maria Laurino. newSpecify the genre of the book on their own. Author: Maria Laurino. Title: Were You Always an Italian?: Ancestors and Other Icons of Italian America. No user reports were added yet. Be the first! Send report: This is a good book. Help us to make General-Ebooks better!

Download PDF book format. n-us -. Library of Congress Call Number: E184. Dewey Decimal Classification Number: 973/. 0451/0092 B 21. Personal Name: Laurino, Maria.

Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Were you always an Italian : ancestors and other icons of Italian America Maria Laurino. Book's title: Were you always an Italian : ancestors and other icons of Italian America Maria Laurino. Library of Congress Control Number: 00026028. International Standard Book Number (ISBN): 0393049302. Publication, Distribution, et. New York. Norton & C. (c)2000.

Ancestors and Other Icons of Life in Italian America . Other hyphenated Americans who have experienced discrimination and confusion about their heritage will find this often funny and graceful book simpatico. Pub Date: July 1st, 2000. Categories of Interest: Select All. Biography & Memoir.

"One of the best books about the immigrant experience in America....unique and gracefully written."―San Francisco Chronicle

Maria Laurino sifts through the stereotypes bedeviling Italian Americans to deliver a penetrating and hilarious examination of third-generation ethnic identity. With "intelligence and honesty" (Arizona Republic), she writes about guidos, bimbettes, and mammoni (mama's boys in Italy); examines the clashing aesthetics of Giorgio Armani and Gianni Versace; and unravels the etymology of southern Italian dialect words like gavone and bubidabetz. According to Frances Mayes, she navigates the conflicting forces of ethnicity "with humor and wisdom."
Mullador
Maybe we're all searching for ourselves now; maybe that's why genealogy has become so popular, because we're all trying to figure out what it means to be who we are. Whatever the reason, I've amassed a collection of books relating to the Italian-American experience, and along with Alfred Lubrano's working-class manifesto "Limbo," this is one of the best.

Books about Italian-American life seem to fall into one of three categories, none good or helpful:

1) Saccharine false memories
2) Racist mob/guido garbage
3) Self-abnegating junk by Italian-American academics trying to apologize for their heritage to their white tenure committees

This book manages to avoid all of this and present a candid view of the experience, warts and all, and the kinds of confusion it can bring to be not-quite-white in a country where race, culture, and ethnicity is only allowed to come in a very limited crayon-color palette.

There are a lot of books on this topic that should be avoided, and a few that should be thrown out as far as you can throw them. This one, however, is a keeper.
Purestone
As my son is a fourth generational Italian American who has assimilated into the American mainstream with a much greater and unconscious ease than the generations that came before him, he has the luxury of taking a look at the past without getting beleagured by it. I purchased this book to help him understand how what he calls his difference from other Americans of European descent will help him understand himself and better define his dreams and desires. I grew up on Long Island where many of my peers were also Italian American--certainly the melting pot of Irish, Italian, and Polish middle to upper middle class groupings has little to do with the more mainstream America in which my son matured. My first foray into the canyons of Wall Street quickly altered my sheltered definition of American society. Suddenly, ethnicity was not something you declared as easily as your name in an introduction. On the contrary, your surname, ending with that telltale vowel, relegated you to a second ranking of sorts--nothing that was actually said in so many words, but indeed felt. Not my idea of the American Dream.

The title of Maria Laurino's book of essays addresses just this issue. Were you always an Italian? I'd have to say 'yes', but I didn't go out of my way to share my culture with anyone that was not of the fold. I don't think Laurino did either; she speaks knowledgeably of her 'difference', at first speaking of personal differences of food and clothing choices and then citing Harvard sociological studies on the Southern Italian mentality on issues like family, community versus the individual and distrust of outsiders. She corrects the mistake that many Italian Americans make when they visit 'the homeland' for the first time, erroneously thinking that Florence, Milan and Rome are synonymous with Naples, Corsenza and Palermo. Her study of dialect borders on the hilarious---this is strictly an Italian American viewpoint--no other ethnic group is going to get a kick out of hearing the dialect words compared to their Tuscan Italian equivalents and hear the Naples linguist explain their significance. Eventually, Laurino's own quest for an understanding of her own ethnic identity takes her to earthquake-torn Calabria where she embraces cousins she never knew she even had.

Laurino's book for the most part is a personal journey of ethnic discovery and acceptance for the Italian American who breeches the gap between the immigrant and full-fledged American. Her particular issues don't always reflect my own, but there is a thread running through each of the individual chapters that resonates some deep chord within me that I thought I'd forgotten.

Bottom Line: I enjoyed this book immensely. I recommend it with the same reservation I made to my son: use it as a kickboard to your own voyage of discovery, don't expect it to answer your specific ethnic assimilation quandries---you're better off speaking to an older relative and actually writing down what this elder statesman tells you so that your adult mind can see what your child's mind wanted to forget.
Just_paw
I just love Maria's experience. My ancestors came from Southern Italy, I came out of the Italian ghetto of East Harlem at a time Purto Ricans were migrating into the neighborhood. My parents moved out in my early teens and that is when I started to notice the prejudice of others to Italians at that point my identity of being Italian was firmly established and the barbs of others didn't bother me as much as Maria when she was growing up. I found most interesting the derogatory terms Northern Italians used towards those from the south. Great companion piece to the recent PBS documentary. I too like Maria am troubled when I see the overt racism Italians portray in their neighborhoods.
Fani
Good read
Yayrel
This is an excellent book
Gavinrage
I really enjoyed Maria's book. She grew up in the same era
as myself, but she grew up isolated in the 'burbs, while I grew
up in a largely italian area. The difference of her experience
as well as her reactions to it were fascinating. Well written, interesting and informative. A good read, and explains a lot about the "mobster mentality" that is erroneously associated
with Italian americans
Chuynopana
A STORY ABOUT A WOMAN, WHO GREW UP ASHAMED OF BEING ITALIAN ... BECAUSE OF THE WAY SHE AND HER FAMILY WERE TREATED ...IT IS A FUN ACCOUNT OF HER LIFE,AND HOW SHE CHANGED HER MIND ABOUT BEING ITALIAN AND DECIDED IT WAS GREAT TO GROW UP IN HER HOME.
Male or Female, 1st, 2nd, or 3rd generation this book is a must read. I think I might be a little older than the author having grown up in the late 40's and in the 50's. I also come from New Jersey (Trenton) and initially raised by my grandmother gravitated between the burbs my parents had moved to and the Italian section known as the burg. I basically grew up in both worlds, the old and the new. I never really thought much about who I was, but an experience I encountered in the 1990's with a section of the Navy rattled that foundation resulting in a search for my Italian heritage. Having read "Were you always an Italian?" has helped in making me understand myself. It has shown me that the choice's made and the direction traveled is not unique. A must read for every Italian-American.
Were You Always an Italian?: Ancestors and Other Icons of Italian America ebook
Author:
Maria Laurino
Category:
History & Criticism
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1563 kb
FB2 size:
1708 kb
DJVU size:
1834 kb
Language:
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company; Reprint edition (June 17, 2001)
Pages:
224 pages
Rating:
4.1
Other formats:
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