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A Dead Man in Deptford (Burgess, Anthony) ebook

by Anthony Burgess


Praise for Anthony Burgess's. A Dead Man in Deptford. A Shorter Finnegans Wake. A dead man. In deptford.

Praise for Anthony Burgess's. lush, elegant writing. Burgess's sense of smelly bodies, religious fanaticism, and death lurking around every corner is immaculate. A delicious engagement of the past for every fiction lover. To Sam Wanamaker (and family) as a tribute to his courage in bringing back from the dead a playhouse that Marlowe never knew.

With A Dead Man in Deptford, Burgess concluded his literary career to overwhelming acclaim for his re-creation of the Elizabethan poet Christopher Marlowe. In lavish, pitch-perfect, and supple, readable prose, Burgess matches his splendid Shakespeare novel, Nothing Like the Sun. The whole world of Elizabethan England-from the intrigues of the courtroom, through the violent With A Dead Man in Deptford, Burgess concluded his literary career to overwhelming acclaim for his re-creation of the Elizabethan poet Christopher Marlowe.

One of this prolific author's finest books, A Dead Man in Deptford is a worthy companion volume to Burgess's classic Shakespeare novel, Nothing Like the Sun (1964).

Only 10 left in stock (more on the way). One of this prolific author's finest books, A Dead Man in Deptford is a worthy companion volume to Burgess's classic Shakespeare novel, Nothing Like the Sun (1964).

A Dead Man in Deptford is a 1993 novel by Anthony Burgess, the last to be published during his lifetime. It depicts the life and character of Christopher Marlowe, a renowned playwright of the Elizabethan era. Reckless but brilliant Cambridge scholar Kit Marlowe is conscripted by Francis Walsingham to be a spy for Queen Elizabeth

John Anthony Burgess Wilson, FRSL (/ˈbɜːrdʒəs/; 25 February 1917 – 22 November 1993), who published under the name Anthony Burgess, was an English writer and composer.

John Anthony Burgess Wilson, FRSL (/ˈbɜːrdʒəs/; 25 February 1917 – 22 November 1993), who published under the name Anthony Burgess, was an English writer and composer. Although Burgess was predominantly a comic writer, his dystopian satire A Clockwork Orange remains his best-known novel. In 1971, it was adapted into a highly controversial film by Stanley Kubrick, which Burgess said was chiefly responsible for the popularity of the book. Anthony Burgess was born in 1917 in Manchester, England. He had originally applied for a degree in music, but was unable to pass the entrance exams. Burgess considered himself a composer first, one who later turned to literature.

Book DescriptionWith A Dead Man in Deptford, Burgess concluded his literary career to overwhelming acclaim for his re-creation of the Elizabethan poet Christopher Marlowe.

A dead man in Deptford. Marlowe, Christopher, 1564-1593 - Fiction. Dramatists - Fiction. Deptford (London, England) - Fiction. Carroll & Graf Publishers.

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With A Dead Man in Deptford, Burgess concluded his literary career to overwhelming acclaim for his re-creation of the Elizabethan poet Christopher Marlowe. In lavish, pitch-perfect, and supple, readable prose, Burgess matches his splendid Shakespeare novel, Nothing Like the Sun. The whole world of Elizabethan England—from the intrigues of the courtroom, through the violent streets of London, to the glory of the theater—comes alive in this joyous celebration of the life of Christopher Marlowe, murdered in suspicious circumstances in a tavern brawl in Deptford more than four hundred years ago.
Shem
Written on the quartercentenary of Marlowe’s death in 1993, having written Nothing Like the Sun on the quartercentenary of Shakespeare’s birth 1964. Burgess had done his university thesis on Marlowe. Marlowe’s stabbing during a Deptford tavern brawl of 1593 produced the most infamous murder in English literary history. Less than 2 weeks before his death, a warrant for his arrest on charges of blasphemy and atheism had been issued by the Privy Council. Burgess is haunted by the ghost of Marlowe as was Shakespeare in 1593, when his work began to take off. Shakespeare was to emerge from the shadow of Marlowe’s ‘mighty line’. Burgess was to write the novel he’d been meaning to write on Marlowe (his last), prior to his own death. The two grammar school boys met in this daring project. Writing like thought is the dagger to the frontal lobes and scream, staying accurately close to the facts. Written with extraordinary richness, and depth, pushing data into fictional form. We get the spies and Spy master, Sir Thomas Walsingham, the thugs Skeres, Fritzer and Poley; Raleigh; there are vital sketches of actors and playwrights like Nashe, Kyd, Shakespeare, Hemming,Condell and Alleyn.

Marlowe’s protagonists had been an infidel: an Atheist or a pagan, a Mohammedan or a Jew. Catholics in the 16th century were seen as Atheists who professed to believe in Christ for reasons of policy-what John Donne would call ‘perfidiousness or dissembling of Religion.’ This was an anti-Machiavellian presumption. Burgess himself, a lapsed Catholic, was empathetic to the Atheist point of view. He seemed at ease in the world inhabited by Marlowe, he equates the assassinated Marlowe with the murdered Christ. He gives full reign to the poet’s non-belief, showing the condemnation and distrust it incurred. That Marlowe is the dead man is a foregone conclusion contained in the title. Another dead man at the feast is Anthony Burgess, who is soon to die, this his last book. He seems to prefigure this in the writing. The narrator is a player of the Lord Chamberlain’s Men. He later reveals: 'Enter Prince, Leonato, Claudio, and Jacke Wilson', used as an epigraph to MF and several times mentioned by Burgess as a notable co-incidence, which indeed it is. So there are two separate versions of this ghostly presence. In Part 3 Burgess speaks in his own voice: “I that die these deaths that feed this flame. put off this disguise”.

Plays are a metaphor for social life, and the roles we play, personas of religious, sexual orthodoxy, observance, politeness, when behind the scenes we deceive, blaspheme, are rude or homosexual. We follow closely Marlowe’s peregrinations abroad, to Scotland, Canterbury, London and Deptford. He is completing slowly his education at Cambridge, whilst also being initiated, involved as a government spy with several unsavoury characters. He is also shagging, shacking up with lovers along the way. Early on he helps his Father out in shoe-making and repairs, prior to Cambridge, and we meet his siblings. He is trying to uncover Catholic plots vs. Queen Elizabeth. He is also writing his plays. You could say another man’s life (Shakespeare’s) begins where another man’s (Marlowe’s) ends. Marlowe’s life was as dangerous as his thought and ,as much as he dared, he used drama as a vehicle for his revolutionary conceptions, though conclusions of his plays were necessarily orthodox. The poet of extremes preoccupied with fire, the stars, the heavens, the flight of birds, and all things clear, brilliant, swiftly moving and aspiring. This book gets even more into the Elizabethan idioms and rhythms than Nothing Like The Sun does.

Marlowe was the source of iambic pentameter, which changed English drama. Burgess was drawn to Marlowe because Burgess” was a renegade Catholic who mocked at hell but was still secretly scared of it”, especially during the war years when bombs were dropping. He felt secretly Marlowe to be such a man, “his blasphemies and beery jags the true voice of imperfect emancipation. I regarded him as a sort of proto- Joyce.” “Why this is hell, nor am I out of it.” Burgess sees Marlowe as a young Renaissance intellectual, unable totally to free himself from the grip of medieval superstition. Hell, Christ’s blood streaming, vats of boiling oil, the damned soul pushing off midnight with bare hands. The narrative very often follows Marlowe into closed rooms, relates secret conversations with spymasters or lovers, or even travels inside the main character's head. That Burgess was able to write a great historical novel and a great gay novel, was a feat only he could pull off. He wallows in the grime, shit, piss, dead dogs, and the dirtiness of Marlowe’s sexuality, and the guilt of his association with Raleigh, another Atheist. Any man could say or do the wrong thing and end up, hung, drawn and quartered. Indeed we get a graphic description of such. It is this look at the dark side of life, the bleak dark energy, that draws you in. Burgess has fulfilled the promise he made in 1968 to write
a true Marlovian book.
Kendis
This is Anthony Burgess's final work but a stupendous one.
He writes as if he were actually living in 1585 in London with
the likes of Sir Walter Raleigh, Elizabeth I, Will 'Shagspere',
and the wonderful Christopher Marlowe. Burgess quotes
Marlowe's lines from his plays and verse, shows us how he
was a spy for the Queen, and describes his murder in the
Mermaid Tavern in Deptford, a port on the Thames River,
and speculates WHY he was murdered. A splendid book.
Dilkree
Burgess made me feel like I was an eye witness to the time period and events described therein, which is exactly what I was looking for. To make
Marlowe a living being, with all his flaws and contradictory genius at the same time, brings some balance to my own concept of this literary giant.
Ienekan
I've read and re-read this. Anthony Burgess last book and one of his best
Chinon
Great book. Burgess richly imagines Marlowe and Elizabethan political and intellectual life. But Burgess expects a lot of background knowledge from his readers. You should really know Elizabethan lit and history to read the book productively.
*Nameless*
Anthony Burgess is known most for "The Clockwork Orange" but this late novel (about the death of Christopher Marlowe) and Nothing Like the Sun (abut William Shakespeare) are works of sublime imagination and style.
Eigeni
Stunning prose, also sexy, and dark, in story and, in my opinion, what really happened to Kit Marlowe in the Elizabethan police state.
Author didn't seem to know where to take this. Poor ending.
A Dead Man in Deptford (Burgess, Anthony) ebook
Author:
Anthony Burgess
Category:
History & Criticism
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1424 kb
FB2 size:
1940 kb
DJVU size:
1476 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Da Capo Press; Reprint edition (March 2003)
Pages:
272 pages
Rating:
4.2
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