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The Birth-mark: unsettling the wilderness in American literary history ebook

by Susan Howe


In The Birth-mark, Howe insists not on the return of the author but the resurgence of writing and of the poetic . is an astonishing work re-presenting the American past, its history, literature, texts, and critics.

In The Birth-mark, Howe insists not on the return of the author but the resurgence of writing and of the poetic as the wildness at the heart of an ever-emerging America. At once gnomic and lucid, grave and scintillating, it is a trespass comparable to Lawrence’s or Olson’s in its passionate grasp of materials, its critical delegitimation of iconic cultural authorities, its fierce originality.

Susan Howe approaches early American literature as pet and critic, blending scholarship with passionate commitment and unique view of her subject. Susan Howe approaches early American literature as pet and critic, blending scholarship with passionate commitment and unique view of her subject.

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The Birth-mark: Unsettling the Wilderness in American Literary History (1993). Unsettling the Wilderness: Susan Howe and American History", Contemporary Literature, . 7, n° 4, 1996, pp. 586–601. Against Transparency : From the Radiant Cluster to the Word as Such" & "How it means: Making Poetic Sense in Media Society" in Radical Artifice, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1998.

Similar books and articles. The Birth of Tragedy in the Cinquecento: Humanism and Literary History. Kristine Louise Haugen - 2011 - Journal of the History of Ideas 72 (3):351-370

Similar books and articles. Mark Bauerlein - 1998 - Philosophy and Literature 22 (2). The Possibility of Managing for Wilderness. David Graham Henderson - 2009 - Environmental Ethics 31 (4):413-429. Kristine Louise Haugen - 2011 - Journal of the History of Ideas 72 (3):351-370. C. S. Schreiner - 1995 - Philosophy and Literature 19 (1):192-194.

Susan Howe, from The Birth-mark: Unsettling the Wilderness in American Literary History, n. lit quotes susan howe the birth-mark unsettling the wilderness in american literary history writings x. 3,361 notes.

The Birth-Mark: Unsettling the Wilderness in American Literary History (1993) was named one of the "International Books of. .In 2011, Susan Howe was awarded the Bollingen Prize in American Poetry from Yale University.

The Birth-Mark: Unsettling the Wilderness in American Literary History (1993) was named one of the "International Books of the Year" in the Times Literary Supplement in 1993. Examining the difference between an original manuscript, with its revisions and notes in margins the very evidence of the creative process-and its tidier, revised version that clings neatly to the parameters of a page, Howe looks into the work of colonial writers such as Anne Hutchinson and Cotton Mather, then moves into the works of Dickinson and Herman Melville.

from The Birth-Mark: Unsettling the Wilderness in American Literary . Used with permission of the author

from The Birth-Mark: Unsettling the Wilderness in American Literary History. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 1993. Used with permission of the author. These Flames and Generosities of the Heart. Franklin, in 1986, this time published by the Amherst College Press, show me that in a system of restricted exchange

The Birth-mark is a welcome republication of Howe’s work on pre-20th-century American writing and an important extension of her poetics into the . unsettling the wilderness in American literary history. Published 2015-12-07 New Directions 208 Pages.

The Birth-mark is a welcome republication of Howe’s work on pre-20th-century American writing and an important extension of her poetics into the world of literary scholarship, to which she has contributed a great deal. As she writes in her introduction, I have trespassed into the disciplines of American Studies and Textual Criticism through my need to fathom what wildness and absolute freedom is the nature of expression.

Susan Howe is a professor of English at the State University of New York-Buffalo. Most of her later poetry has been collected in The Nonconformist's Memorial (New Directions, 1993), The Europe of Trusts: Selected Poems (Sun & Moon Press, 1990), and Singularities (Wesleyan University Press, 1990). She is also the author of two landmark books of postmodernist criticism, The Birth-mark: unsettling the wilderness in American literary history (Wesleyan University Press, 1993) and My Emily Dickinson (North Atlantic Books, 1985).

A stimulating examination of early American literature
Narder
This is an experience in itself; it is history, poetry, criticism (literary and social). It is all bound up within Howe's "alternative" perspective of American literary history. It is a reading of the blanks and erasures still discoverable in primary documents.

It is a kind of commonplace book of Howe's reading with commentary. Not only are the quotations new (to one not steeped in Puritan literature from the 1630s) but they are utterly contemporary in what we experience still in this Puritan land.

These glimpses are flashes of brilliant light in the thunder storm of a dangerous and violent American culture.
Felolak
For those who have read Susan Howe's poetry and marvelled at, but did not fully understand it, this book is compelling in its explanatory power. The quotations in the preface alone are worth the price of admission, for it is here than one can see how impressive is her understanding of Emily Dickinson's writing. By exposing the manuscript story behind Dickinson's works, Susan Howe has made a lasting contribution to American literature. Her essay on Cotton Mather is a charmer, certain to drive readers to find a copy of his Magnalia. The essay Incloser is a stylistic dynamo. There is also an interview with the author that sheds new light on her works.
But what will make this book immortal is Susan Howe's essay These Flames and Generosities of the Heart: Emily Dickinson and the Illogic of Sumptuary Values. To anyone who has read Emily Dickinson's poems in a "standard" or "variorum" edition of any sort, this book is a must, because you will soon learn that you have not, in fact, been reading Dickinson's words, but instead an editor's (inaccurate) version of them (whether Johnson or Franklin). Susan Howe demonstrates with a clarity and perception unmatched by any editor how the only way to understand and fully appreciate Emily Dickinson is by reading her manuscripts, some of which are reproduced in this book. And the manuscripts only make one appreciate more intensely the achievement of Emily Dickinson. If you've read Susan Howe's My Emily Dickinson, you must buy this book, as it completes the true story. It is a staggering achievement that will long be remembered as a landmark event in the understanding of America's greatest poet. American academia owes Susan Howe a debt of incalculable magnitude for this essay alone.
(Note on the other review of this book: how anyone can give this book fewer than 5 stars is a mystery. Susan Howe is a marvelous storyteller with a breadth of interests that cannot fail to intrigue even the most casual reader.)
Vizuru
You'll never read a book the same way again after "The Birth-mark"--you'll wonder about all the spaces, dashes, deletions and marginalia that didn't make it from manuscript to print. For Howe that's where the wild voices hide, dangerous figures like Anne Hutchinson, Mary Rowlandson and Emily Dickinson who threatened "civilized" male control. Howe samples texts like a hip-hop DJ, switching between voices to prove her point that editing was a typically male response to the wilderness that women (and the New World) represented.
Howe's passion for her subject is obvious, especially in the interview at the end. But the essays sometimes felt to me at least more like a display of cleverness than an effort to understand the figures she writes about. Like Charles Olson's "Call Me Ishmael," Howe's model, "The Birth-mark" squats a little uneasily between scholarship and poetry. The poet's own voice and sense of style tend to muffle the more distant Puritan voices, male and female, she's out to recover. Maybe this is the danger of not editing one's voice as a historian. Still, I'm glad I read this book--yet another reminder of what doesn't get into history and why.
The Birth-mark: unsettling the wilderness in American literary history ebook
Author:
Susan Howe
Category:
History & Criticism
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1568 kb
FB2 size:
1144 kb
DJVU size:
1857 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Wesleyan (April 1, 1993)
Pages:
208 pages
Rating:
4.1
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