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Walk On, Bright Boy ebook

by Charles Davis


Walk On, Bright Boy, which takes its title from an Arabic text, is about understanding the universe by observing its wonders, especially as these are seen and felt in childhood a time of wonder, magic and exploring, seeking, learning that is all but lost to most adults.

Walk On, Bright Boy, which takes its title from an Arabic text, is about understanding the universe by observing its wonders, especially as these are seen and felt in childhood a time of wonder, magic and exploring, seeking, learning that is all but lost to most adults. An exception proves to be the unconverted Moor who lived in the narrator's aldea, or remote village.

Walk On, Bright Boy book.

Walk on, Bright Boy : A Novel. Set in Medieval Spain, this story of a boy's first confrontation with political and religious corruption strives less for historical accuracy than for universal applicability. Written with lovely economy and sensitivity, it is reminiscent of a fable or of a young adult coming-of-age tale. At the same time, however, it is also complex in its exploration of human foibles and philosophies. The hero, a boy who is never named, is part of a settlement of Catholic Spaniards, who have recently replaced a population of Moors. One Moor remains to help the new residents manage an irrigation system,.

Hitler, mussolini, and me. by Charles Davis. Standing at the crossroads. Walking the dog.

Find nearly any book by CHARLES DAVIS. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. ISBN 9781904946656 (978-1-904946-65-6) Softcover, Discovery Walking Guides Ltd. Find This Book.

Charles Franklin Davis (born November 14, 1964) is an American football analyst. He is currently an analyst for Fox NFL, with Kevin Burkhardt and Pam Oliver, and contributes weekly "Power Rankings" on Foxsports. Along with Brandon Gaudin, he is the analyst for the Madden NFL series. He is also an analyst for the NFL Network, and has previously worked with TBS, ESPN, CBS, The Golf Channel and Sun Sports (now Fox Sports Sun).

Personal Name: Davis, Charles, 1960-. Rubrics: Walking Fiction Friendship Betrayal. Download now Walk on, bright boy : a novel by Charles Davis. Download PDF book format. Download DOC book format.

Monking - Charles Davis, Barry Harris, Peter Washington, Ben Riley. Открывайте новую музыку каждый день. Лента с персональными рекомендациями и музыкальными новинками, радио, подборки на любой вкус, удобное управление своей коллекцией. Миллионы композиций бесплатно и в хорошем качестве.

A touching account of friendship and betrayal in Moorish Spain, Walk On, Bright Boy evokes the pleasures and purposes of walking as a way of engaging with life. Marrying a coming-of-age tale with Gothic horror, it is at once an adventure story, a celebration of the power of dreams, magic and illusion, and an uplifting fable about the joys of living, even in the shadow of death. Both timely and timeless, it can be read as an allegory of contemporary political expediencies and as a parable of personal enlightenment.
Jwalextell
This is the second book by Charles Davis that I have read (after his more recent STANDING AT THE CROSSROADS) and I don't suppose it will be the last. There is a radiant humanity in his writing, and an attraction to thoughtful, independent characters who cut through the prejudices of their culture to seek for truth. Insofar as I can judge from only two books, his protagonists have a perfect balance between thought and action, equally at home on a mountain crag as in a book. As an English-born reader of a certain age, perhaps I am biased by recognizing something peculiarly British and slightly old-fashioned in this ideal (as in a novel, say, by Geoffrey Household), but it contributes largely to my enjoyment.

"My parents did not intend that I should learn letters, still less that I end my days confined and awaiting the pleasure of the Holy Spanish Inquisition...." The unnamed storyteller is writing in the early Sixteenth Century, telling of his childhood in a small mountain village in Southern Spain. The Moors have just been driven out of their last hold on the peninsula, and the village has been settled by people from the north. But one Moor remains, living in the hills and looking after the village's water supply. He is a figure of fascination to the children, entertaining them with simple tricks, telling stories salted with the wisdom of another culture, and above all teaching them to walk as a means of entering into harmony with the world and escaping into oneself: "Walking is the resource of the isolated and the solace of the powerless."

There are only two other significant characters, both also unnamed. One is the coarse Factor, who collects taxes for the nearby monastery with a hefty surcharge for himself. The other is the Inquisitor, who comes to investigate certain accusations pointing to the Moor. The immediate course of the story is almost a foregone conclusion, as is the aged writer's eventual fate, but what the author does exceptionally well is to show the child's reluctantly dawning sympathy for the subtlety of the Inquisitor's mind, as well as his regret for the childhood mentor whom he unwittingly betrays. He will indeed learn his letters and enter the Church himself, but the mountaintop lessons taught by the Moor will never leave him.

WALK ON, BRIGHT BOY is the same length as STANDING AT THE CROSSROADS (160 pages), but it feels slimmer, clearly a novella rather than a short novel. I was a little disappointed at first, missing the greater range of color, character, and event of the later book, and especially the reality of the setting in contemporary Sudan, where religious terrorism is still a burning issue. I wonder if Davis's future books will continue to grow in this way. But I realize that if I had come upon this book just by itself, I would have been entranced by its poise and simple wisdom. [4.5 stars]
Vetibert
Set in Medieval Spain, this story of a boy's first confrontation with political and religious corruption strives less for historical accuracy than for universal applicability. Written with lovely economy and sensitivity, it is reminiscent of a fable or of a young adult coming-of-age tale. At the same time, however, it is also complex in its exploration of human foibles and philosophies.

The hero, a boy who is never named, is part of a settlement of Catholic Spaniards, who have recently replaced a population of Moors. One Moor remains to help the new residents manage an irrigation system, which the Moors have developed. The boy befriends the Moor, but after the disappearance of several small children, the Moor is demonized and accused of killing them. He is executed by a priest of the Inquisition who comes to the village for that purpose.

While the first half a the story is largely philosophical, as it deals with the development of the friendship between the Moor and the boy, and the boy's coming to espouse a naturally revealed religion, rejecting the hypocrisies of organized religion, the second half of the story is fully dramatic. The boy stumbles upon the true murderer, witnesses the horrors of his deeds, and barely escapes. The depth of this novella along with the excitement of its plot makes it a very successful story that appeals to a various and large audience.

I think most readers will appreciate the message of the tale, which encourages one to come to know spirituality through the careful study of nature and teaches one the value of WALKING in life, as a kind of meditative practice. As an atheist, I did not find the critique of organized religion that interesting, and I was not inspired to find God through nature. (I was inspired to do more walking and hiking. What the story tells us about walking is truly enlightening.) But there is another message to this tale, not as obvious as the main one, that I did find compelling. This second message involves the character of the Inquisitor. Although he knowingly executes an innocent man, he is more practical than corrupt. The condemnation of the Moor helps to unify the village, so we are told. A Machiavellian to be sure, the Inquisitor acts as though the greater good justifies some lesser evils. We don't believe this, but the boy at least understand the Inquisitor's motives and presents his actions from his point of view.

We also learn the Inquisitor is himself executed later, when he becomes the victim of religious corruption. I couldn't help but like the Inquisitor. He is clever and careful. He thinks before he acts. He is curious, too, which makes him a fairly good listener. He lets the boy talk at the trial, when a more corrupt tyrant would have been more controlling. The boy also holds him in some esteem, although not without some ambivalence too. It is the Inquisitor who saves the boy from the murderer, whisks him away from the village (in which he is no longer welcome as the Moor's "special friend"), recognizes his intelligence, and becomes his mentor. If we like the narrator, the boy, and we do, we also like his two mentors indirectly, the Moor and the Inquisitor, who have helped the boy become the man who he is.

So there is a sentimental story here that everyone will enjoy or appreciate, but there is also another story for more careful, sensitive readers, an alter-story not quite counter to the main one or "deconstructing" it in any way, but adjacent to it, adding depth and meaning. Walk On, Bright Boy is an excellent, much undersung, little novel that you will take great pleasure in reading. I recommend it highly.
Walk On, Bright Boy ebook
Author:
Charles Davis
Category:
Literary
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1501 kb
FB2 size:
1303 kb
DJVU size:
1479 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Permanent Press (August 31, 2007)
Pages:
160 pages
Rating:
4.6
Other formats:
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