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The Gods of Ancient Rome ebook

by Antonia Nevill,Robert Turcan


Robert Turcan shows that Roman attitudes towards the gods continued to be pragmatic throughout the millennium coverd by the book. Useful gods discovered among conquered peoples of the Empire were adopted without rejecting any from the old pantheon.

Robert Turcan shows that Roman attitudes towards the gods continued to be pragmatic throughout the millennium coverd by the book. Traditional worship remained strong long after the emperors converted to Christianity, and many of the early Roman Christians maintained a tactful respect for older deities

Robert Turcan shows that Roman attitudes towards the gods continued to be pragmatic throughout the millennium coverd by the book. Traditional worship remained strong long after the emperors converted to Christianity, and many of the early Roman Christians maintained a tactful respect for older deities

Robert Turcan, Antonia Nevill (Translator). The book is divided into three parts: the Gods of Earth and the family, devoted to archaic Rome; the Gods of City, covering the Roman Republic and early Imperial Rome; and the Gods of the Empire

Robert Turcan, Antonia Nevill (Translator). The book is divided into three parts: the Gods of Earth and the family, devoted to archaic Rome; the Gods of City, covering the Roman Republic and early Imperial Rome; and the Gods of the Empire.

Robert Turcan, Antonia Nevill (Translator).

Religion in ancient Rome

Religion in ancient Rome. Marcus Aurelius (head covered) sacrificing at the Temple of Jupiter. A lectisternium is a banquet for the gods, at which they appear as images seated on couches, as if present and participating. In describing the lectisternium of the Twelve Great gods in 217 BC, the Augustan historian Livy places the deities in gender-balanced pairs:. Mars, god of war and father of Romulus, the founder of Rome; one of the Archaic Triad assigned a flamen maior; lover of Venus; one of the Dii Consentes. Greek equivalent-Ares. Mater Matuta, goddess of dawn and childbirth, patroness of mariners.

Robert Turcan is Professor of Roman History at the Sorbonne. He has published widely on Roman antiquity, mainly on aspects of religion. His books include Cults of the Roman Empire (1996) and Mithras et le Mithriacisme (1991). Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

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Are you sure you want to remove The Gods of Ancient Rome from your list? The Gods of Ancient Rome. Religion in Everyday Life from Archaic to Imperial Times. Published December 13, 2000 by Routledge.

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Translated by Antonia Nevill: Download PDF book format. Translated by Antonia Nevill. Library of Congress Control Number

Translated by Antonia Nevill: Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. The Gods of ancient Rome : religion in everyday life from archaic to imperial times Robert Turcan. Book's title: The Gods of ancient Rome : religion in everyday life from archaic to imperial times Robert Turcan. Library of Congress Control Number

This book is about the multiplicity of gods and religions that characterized the Roman world before . Robert Turcan is Professor of Roman History at the Sorbonne. Antonia Nevill is a committed European and lifelong Francophile.

This book is about the multiplicity of gods and religions that characterized the Roman world before Constantine. It was not the noble gods such as Jove, Apollo, Diana who were crucial to the lives of the common people in the Empire, but gods of an altogether more earthly, earthly level, whose rituals and observances may now seem bizarre. He is a former student of the Ecole Normale Superieure, and a member of both the École Française in Rome and the Institut Francais.

This is a vivid account of what their gods meant to the Romans from archaic times to late antiquity, and of the rites and rituals connected with them. After an introduction into the nature of classical religion, the book is divided into three parts: religions of the family and land; religions of the city; and religions of the empire. The book ends with a discussion of the rise and impact of Christianity. For the Romans, the author argues, religion was almost as much a form of insurance as it was a question of belief. The gods were valued according to the degree of protection they afforded against natural hazards and occult powers. They were a crucial source of tactical information in time of war and their approval was vital to the success of agriculture, marriage and childbirth. Appeasing the gods and enlisting their help involved ritual and sacrifice which required the arcane knoweldge of the priesthood. Because there were so many gods, it might be hard to know which one to invoke and perilous to get it wrong. The Romasn took their gods extremely seriously, there was nothing more complicated than a Roman sacrifice or more precise than the preparation of the meal offered to the god; the slightest infringement of the priestly recipe would spoil the feast and might jeopardise the affairs of Rome itself. Robert Turcan shows that Roman attitudes towards the gods continued to be pragmatic throughout the millennium coverd by the book. Useful gods discovered among conquered peoples of the Empire were adopted without rejecting any from the old pantheon. Traditional worship remained strong long after the emperors converted to Christianity, and many of the early Roman Christians maintained a tactful respect for older deities. Up-to-date in its archaeological and epigraphic evidence, and drawing extensively on a wide range of relevant literary material this book is ideally suited for undergraduate courses in the history of Romand and its religions. Its urbane style and lightly worn scholarship will broaden its appeal to non-academic readers with a serious interest in the classical world.
inform
This book is dry and scholarly at times and yet I still enjoyed it because the subject matter is interesting and I trusted the information contained therein. This is one of those books I know I will be happy to have on my shelf as a solid reference text. I think one of the problems with the book is that is does not discuss each God (not even the major ones) in detail, nor the practices associated with a specific God (except re the mystery cults). It is very much an overview of Pagan practices in ancient Rome and the broad way in which the author deals with the subject probably accounts for the occaisional dryness of the text. It is probably directed more at academic types who wish to improve their understanding of the daily life and mentality ancient Romans (which is a noble subject in itself) more than really looking at the spiritual aspect of Pagan deities and practice.
Wenyost
Amaranth Books did an excellent job of keeping in contact with me, and responded to my order quicker than anyone I have ever bought from. The book arrived exactly as it was described and they even included a personalized message thanking me for ordering. I originally chose to order this book from Amaranth on a whim, but now I will always look to see if they have my book before I look anywhere else.
Faezahn
The Roman Pagans were a deeply religious people. Turcan's book shows us a great deal about how they worshipped and what rituals they observed. And this book gives even a secular reader a chance to make some sense of it.

Unlike the monotheist god, Roman Goddesses and Gods are perfections of actual attributes. Romans hailed the Gods and Goddesses casually. But their rituals were often serious and complex, for they had to instill a sense of the importance of a vow to be worthy of a particular Goddess or God. And Turcan's book shows us some of these rituals in detail.

As Turcan mentions, when the Romans stopped worshipping the Gods and Goddesses, the Roman Empire quickly fell apart. I think the Christian religion that replaced the Pantheon with a nailed corpse gave Romans little reason to defend their Empire. The new religion was too nihilistic and atheistic. Turcan does not appear to agree with me about this, but he does cite Zosimus who did hold Constantine's failure to celebrate the Secular Games in 314 AD to be responsible for the ruin of the Empire. Turcan also explains that by celebrating the Secular Games, the Romans were in effect "taking out a new 'lease' with the gods."

This is a scholarly and interesting work. I recommend it to Pagans and non-Pagans alike.
Aradwyn
I recently used this book as part of a Summer-session university course on the Archaeology of Religion. Although it contains a healthy amount of information about little known facts concerning Roman religion, it is not for the average reader. Originally written in French, the translation is somewhat poor and confusing.
The majority of the class was at a loss due to the complexity of the book. Even my somewhat rudimentary knowledge of Roman religion was barely adequate to follow the writings. The book lacks adequate chapter breaks resulting in the reader being forced to read the entirety in order not to lose his place.
It says a lot when the professor privately told me that it was a poor choice for a textbook.
The Gods of Ancient Rome ebook
Author:
Antonia Nevill,Robert Turcan
Category:
Mythology & Folk Tales
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1826 kb
FB2 size:
1842 kb
DJVU size:
1613 kb
Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press (October 30, 2000)
Pages:
256 pages
Rating:
4.9
Other formats:
doc mbr lit mobi
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