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Poison in Jest ebook

by John Dickson Carr


But John Dickson Carr really lets loose in this mystery and gives us a dysfunctional family's gourmet guide to poisons . Read "Poison in Jest" for its brooding Gothic atmosphere-the marble emperor's detached hand; lights that won't stay on; staircases creaking in the night.

But John Dickson Carr really lets loose in this mystery and gives us a dysfunctional family's gourmet guide to poisons-three of them: arsenic; morphine; and hydrobromide of hyoscin (the infamous Dr. Crippen used hyoscin to dispose of his wife in 1910). In the 1930s, arsenic could be purchased in any pharmacy as a rat poison, but for the latter two poisons to be lying around the mansion, it helps to have a doctor marry in to the family.

John Dickson Carr (November 30, 1906 – February 27, 1977) was an American author of detective stories, who also published using the pseudonyms Carter Dickson, Carr Dickson and Roger Fairbairn. Carr is generally regarded as one of the greatest writers of so-called "Golden Age" mysteries; complex, plot-driven stories in which the puzzle is paramount. He was influenced in this regard by the works of Gaston Leroux and by the Father Brown stories of G. K. Chesterton.

I note this is a standalone book. Yet Jeff mentions Bencolin, who features in some other John Dickson Carr books. I wonder if the author based Jeff on himself, as both come from Pennsylvania, spent time in Paris, and avoided becoming lawyers. Oct 05, 2018 Kate rated it liked it.

An inheritance hangs in the balance in a case of stolen identities, imposters, and murderBanished from the idyllic English countryside he once called home and en route to live with his cousin in America, Sir John Farnleigh, black sheep of the wealthy Farnleigh clan, nearly perished in the sinking of the Titanic. SUMMARY: When Dr Gideon Fell, that most eminent of eccentric sleuths, finds himself at a party whose guests are in a state of deep agitation, all the faculties of his detective genius are called into play. Why is the host of the party - Henry Maynard, a Southern aristocrat - so cryptic about the strange goings-on in the stately mansion?

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. I Fantasmi Della Casa Maledetta.

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Novels under the name John Dickson Carr. Carr had originally proposed that this book be published under the pseudonym Christopher Street, but Morrow chose Carr Dickson

Novels under the name John Dickson Carr. Poison in Jest Harper & Brothers, New York, 1932; Hamish Hamilton, London, 1932 Thriller Novel Classic 23, 1944 (abridged), Popular Library 349, 1951; Penguin 250, 1940 Patrick Rossiter; Jeff Marle narrator Carr had originally proposed that this book be published under the pseudonym Christopher Street, but Morrow chose Carr Dickson.

by. Carr, John Dickson, 1906-1977. New York : Collier Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

John Dickson Carr was a very highly regarded American mystery writer, though he lived for most of the '30s and '40s in England, married there and .

Join Waitlist 1. The Exploits of Sherlock Holmes. The case of the constant suicides.

He leaves behind Henri Bencolin, and in the space of the next five years will test out five other personas - ending up, of course, with his iconic Gideon Fell and Sir Henry Merrivale classics.

It is also normal for them to stick to a single poison.

Dictionnaire juridique français-anglais, anglais-français : Law Dictionary sh-French (Harrap's - Dalloz). John Dickson Carr, Kate Nicholson. 1, Dr Fell, 1933-1935. Die spannendsten Detektiv Geschichten. It is also normal for them to stick to a single poison.

Jeff Marle tries to decide which member of Judge Matthew Quayle's unhappy household put poison in the Judge's brandy
Wrathmaster
A poisoner and ax-murderer is stalking through the corridors of Judge Quayle's gloomy old Pennsylvania mansion--or as the lurid cover of the Popular Library edition puts it, "Murder Runs Wild in a House of Fear."

Usually poisoners don't switch to axes. It is also normal for them to stick to a single poison. But John Dickson Carr really lets loose in this mystery and gives us a dysfunctional family's gourmet guide to poisons--three of them: arsenic; morphine; and hydrobromide of hyoscin (the infamous Dr. Crippen used hyoscin to dispose of his wife in 1910).

In the 1930s, arsenic could be purchased in any pharmacy as a rat poison, but for the latter two poisons to be lying around the mansion, it helps to have a doctor marry in to the family. Sadly enough, the doctor who marries into this family is the third victim to be poisoned and the first to die.

A creeping marble hand that has been broken off of a statue of the Emperor Caligula also serves to heighten tensions, especially after people see it scurrying along window ledges like a big white spider.

Jeff Marle, who shows up in many of Carr's Bencolin mysteries as the Parisian juge d'instruction's clueless sidekick, is back in his native Pennsylvania for "Poison in Jest." He is invited over to chez Quayle to critique a manuscript, and almost from the moment he walks through the door, people begin to keel over, including his host. He stays on to help find the poisoner, assisted by the eccentric fiancé of Jinny Quayle. This fiancé is another Dr. Gideon Fell in very slight disguise, e.g. he isn't fat and he doesn't stomp around with crutch-canes. However, he does pop up in the oddest corners, muttering mystical clues that don't really shed any light on the murderer's identity.

Luckily this Dr. Fell clone dies a-borning--I believe this is the only book where he appears, thank god. It wouldn't do to have two of them clumping and mumbling through Carr's mysteries.

Read "Poison in Jest" for its brooding Gothic atmosphere--the marble emperor's detached hand; lights that won't stay on; staircases creaking in the night. In the end, the mystery is rather easy to solve, since there is only one person left whom nobody would suspect.
Bele
JDC is always rewarding; an interesting re-read after all these years. Carr deserves to be remembered.
Levion
As always John Dickson Carr stumps me. I love reading his books and will continue to collect them.
Dondallon
A poisoner and ax-murderer is stalking through the corridors of Judge Quayle's gloomy old Pennsylvania mansion--or as the lurid cover of the Popular Library edition puts it, "Murder Runs Wild in a House of Fear."

Usually poisoners don't switch to axes. It is also normal for them to stick to a single poison. But John Dickson Carr really lets loose in this mystery and gives us a dysfunctional family's gourmet guide to poisons--three of them: arsenic; morphine; and hydrobromide of hyoscin (the infamous Dr. Crippen used hyoscin to dispose of his wife in 1910).

In the 1930s, arsenic could be purchased in any pharmacy as a rat poison, but for the latter two poisons to be lying around the mansion, it helps to have a doctor marry in to the family. Sadly enough, the doctor who marries into this family is the third victim to be poisoned and the first to die.

A creeping marble hand that has been broken off of a statue of the Emperor Caligula also serves to heighten tensions, especially after two people see it scurrying along window ledges like a big white spider.

Jeff Marle, who shows up in many of Carr's Bencolin mysteries as the Parisian juge d'instruction's clueless sidekick, is back in his native Pennsylvania for "Poison in Jest." He is invited over to chez Quayle to critique a manuscript, and almost from the moment he walks through the door, people begin to keel over, including his host. He stays on to help find the poisoner, assisted by the eccentric fiancé of Jinny Quayle. This fiancé is another Dr. Gideon Fell in very slight disguise, e.g. he isn't fat and he doesn't stomp around with crutches. However, he does pop up in the oddest corners, muttering mystical clues that don't really shed any light on the murderer's identity.

Luckily this Dr. Fell clone dies a-borning--I believe this is the only book where he shows up, thank god. It wouldn't do to have two of them clumping and mumbling through Carr's mysteries.

Read "Poison in Jest" for its brooding Gothic atmosphere--the marble emperor's detached hand; lights that won't stay on; staircases creaking in the night. The mystery in the end is rather easy to solve, since there is only one person left whom nobody would suspect.
Poison in Jest ebook
Author:
John Dickson Carr
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1885 kb
FB2 size:
1741 kb
DJVU size:
1287 kb
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Publisher:
Macmillan Pub Co; Reissue edition (March 1, 1985)
Pages:
223 pages
Rating:
4.7
Other formats:
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