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Flight ebook

by Adam Thorpe


Adam Thorpe (born 5 December 1956, Paris, France) is a British poet and novelist whose works also include short stories, translations, radio dramas and documentaries.

Adam Thorpe (born 5 December 1956, Paris, France) is a British poet and novelist whose works also include short stories, translations, radio dramas and documentaries. Adam Thorpe was born in Paris and grew up in India, Cameroon and England.

Adam Thorpe’s tenth novel is an extraordinary amalgam: a vertiginous, page-turning thriller and a masterful work of literary fiction. Fast, funny and very frightening, Flight shows a new facet of this most brilliant of writers. Adam Thorpe was born in Paris in 1956. His first novel, Ulverton, was published in 1992, and he has published two books of stories and six poetry collections – most recently Voluntary. His new translation of Madame Bovary has just been published by Vintage. He lives in France with his wife and family.

Adam Thorpe's tenth novel is an extraordinary amalgam: a vertiginous, page-turning thriller and a masterful work of literary fiction. Bob Winrush used to fly passengers, then worked for years as a 'freight dog', flying consignments of goods and sometimes people to all the corners of the world - including bush-strips in warzones: 'real flying, ' as he called it. Until, one day, he walked away from a deal that didn't smell right - something a freight dog should never do.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. Bob Winrush used to fly passengers.

Bob did not tell all: he said that he knew Sharansky was writing a piece about the landmine flight; he did not say Sharansky had been blackmailing him with it, forcing him to probe. Wear flares, grow your hair long, swing your beads,’ Al chuckled. You’re about thirty-five years out of date, A. ‘What I mean is: everything comes round again, skipper. What else is on that computer?’ he asked airily. Well, the Turkmenbashi flight, obviously. Outbound a. nd inbound. Of great interest to the late man, as you know. There was an audible sigh.

The opening stretch of Adam Thorpe's 12th work of fiction sends several literary ghosts scampering out from .

One is Thorpe's own debut, Ulverton (1992), to the fictitious Wessex village of whose title the hero of this book periodically returns. There the resemblances end, for Flight, sharply written and full of the most beguiling sky-surfer jargon ("boredom tube" for long-haul flight), is a study in realignment, retribution and regret.

Adam Thorpe's tenth novel is an extraordinary amalgam: a vertiginous, page-turning thriller and a masterful work of literary . I have not read Adam Thorpe before but had heard good things of Ulverton. Flight I found disappointing

Adam Thorpe's tenth novel is an extraordinary amalgam: a vertiginous, page-turning thriller and a masterful work of literary fiction. Flight I found disappointing. I read a lot of fiction and hope that what I read will either stir my soul though the beauty and poetry in the writing and/or make me question and consider something about being human.

by Adam Thorpe In the meantime, if you know any books with non-binary main characters yo. .

Fasten your seat-belts for a thrilling trip, in the Hitchcock mould. Our hero, a mercenary pilot, is a man on the run and out of his depth, in flight from a world of murky intrigue and dirty dealings among terrorists, traffickers and arms dealers. After a fast bumpy ride, the pace eases off, as he seeks refuge on a remote Scottish island, then the tension is ratcheted up the notches to the brutal conclusion. In the meantime, if you know any books with non-binary main characters you think we should include, please let us know. Success against the odds.

Bob Winrush was a freight dog, flying consignments of goods and sometimes people to all the corners of the world.

Uncomfortable (because true) piece from The Economist. Jonathan Freedland in today's Guardian

Uncomfortable (because true) piece from The Economist. How Britain and its neighbours misunderstand each other. Jonathan Freedland in today's Guardian. Judging from my personal use of them (inherited from neighbours, less expensive), Dyson products are overhyped crap, anyway.

The exhilarating and gripping new novel from Adam Thorpe. Bob Winrush used to fly passengers, then worked for years as a 'freight dog', flying consignments of goods and sometimes people to all the corners of the world -- including bush-strips in warzones: 'real flying,' as he called it. Until, one day, he walked away from a deal that didn't smell right -- something a freight dog should never do. Now working as a private pilot for an Emirate prince in Dubai, he finds that moment of refusal catching up with him. Caught between those who want to find out more and those who want to cover their traces, he becomes a marked man, and flees to a remote Scottish island. Pursued by both armed assassins and a ruinous, bitter divorce, he struggles to re-fashion himself in this barren, beautiful place, taking on another identity. But back in the world of smuggled AK-47s and heroin, the stakes are rising. Despite the presence of Judith, the lovely environmentalist, memories of his uglier flights return to haunt him. Even in the furthest Hebrides his past is with him, and the predators are closing in. Adam Thorpe's tenth novel is an extraordinary amalgam: a vertiginous, page-turning thriller and a masterful work of literary fiction. Fast, funny and very frightening, Flight shows a new facet of this most brilliant of writers.
Coiril
The PROS: The author's atmospheric prose transported me to the Hebrides where the latter part of the book takes place. I actually felt as though I were on one of sparsely populated islands off the Scottish coast, the wind whipping around me in gales. Similarly, the author captured the sensation of the flight experience from the final flight check, to the shudder of a failing engine to a hair-raising landing on a rutted runway somewhere in deepest Africa.

The CONS: The novel jumps around from past to present as well as from location to location. I too was confused at times and had to reread sections in order to understand where I was and who was who. My biggest complaint, however, SPOILER ALERT is that the thriller doesn't give us the satisfaction of discovering who murdered the crew members along with a journalist. After slogging through three quarters of the novel trying to sort out who is chasing Bob (the protagonist), we are left flat. The book just ends.
Gunos
A superbly written, utterly compelling tale of flighty (as in, flying), flight (as in one who is pursued by all Hell's demons), intrigue and love. Absolutely un-put-down-able. I have never written a review for Amazon, but, as stars are all, my conscience refuses to let Adam Thorp's absolutely wonderful novel languish with one star. I mean, what was that first reviewer thinking!?
Sadaron above the Gods
As a thriller Flight is a little pretentious, a rather uneasy amalgam of lyrical natural history and obscure international racketeering. Not many mercenary aviators running for their lives are preoccupied with the colours of the eyes of basking seals.!
Not quite the rollicking yarn one might expect. More an allegoric "who done what" than "whodunnit".
Lightseeker
This book about a pilot carrying suspicious freight is difficult to read unless you have some prior knowledge of the lingo used by pilots and those working in the airline industry. The plot is difficult to follow. I had to re-read sections to try to understand what was actually going on. Would not recommend this book.
Wrathmaster
The past is catching up with Bob Winrush. His marriage is over as a result of his inconsiderate arrival home early when weather cancelled one of his jobs as a cargo pilot to find his wife in bed with another man but when an investigative journalist starts to dig into some of the content of Bob's previous cargo trips, his life is quickly placed in grave danger. His problems stemmed from having walked away from a particularly morally dubious trip to transport arms to the Taliban some years ago, although it turns out that his moral line in the sand is somewhat blurred. He has knowingly transported guns and military personnel in his time. He's sort of the aeronautical equivalent of white van man.

Winrush is a familiar character from anyone who has seen Hollywood action movies. He's a tough guy with a soft heart. In fact at one point one character laments that they are not in a movie, which is somewhat ironic as, short of wearing a white vest, he screams Bruce Willis character. In fact it would make a strong action movie - perhaps "Fly Hard"?

Adam Thorpe's style is a cut above many action books though. Certainly it is likely to appeal more to male readers I suspect, but it maintains the suspense and feel of someone being after Winrush without him knowing precisely who this might be. When he finds himself hiding out from persons unknown in the Scottish islands, the tension in particular is tangible. There are admittedly some elements of cliché. He seems to have an endless supply of women falling at his feet, from a good time girl in Dubai to the wife of a fisherman in Scotland. He appears as unselective about his female company as he has been about the content of his plane.

There is though, one element to this book that I did struggle with and it comes in two parts. Firstly, there is a fair amount of what you might call flying jargon. All this is explained in context but it does get rather repetitive and all the flight crews seem unable to speak in anything other than this jargon-heavy way. This gets a little wearing and the problem is exacerbated by the endless use of flight similes and metaphors. Some of these are very good, some darkly funny and clever, but to my mind, Thorpe rather over plays this tool. Fewer would have given the good ones so much more power. As it is, hardly a page goes by without out some aircraft related reference and I felt like screaming `yes, I know he's a pilot'. In fact, I can pin point the exact moment that my mind turned from `this is clever' to `this is annoying now' and it's a rather dubious reference to jump jet aircraft in the context of an intimate encounter that might well challenge for that `bad sex in fiction' award.

That aside though, it's a fast paced, action-packed story that is admirably different from the run of the mill action stories and the murky world of arms and drug smuggling are nicely handled.
Flight ebook
Author:
Adam Thorpe
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1283 kb
FB2 size:
1395 kb
DJVU size:
1496 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Jonathan Cape (June 4, 2012)
Pages:
400 pages
Rating:
4.3
Other formats:
lit docx rtf doc
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