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Measure for Measure (Folger Shakespeare Library) ebook

by Dr. Barbara A. Mowat,Paul Werstine Ph.D.,William Shakespeare


William Shakespeare was born in April 1564 in the town of Stratford-upon-Avon, on England’s Avon River. Written amidst Shakespeare's tragedies, "Measure For Measure" is the Bard's last comedy and perhaps his darkest.

William Shakespeare was born in April 1564 in the town of Stratford-upon-Avon, on England’s Avon River. When he was eighteen, he married Anne Hathaway. The couple had three children-an older daughter Susanna and twins, Judith and Hamnet. Hamnet, Shakespeare’s only son, died in childhood. Not so with this comedy. As one critic has it, "Measure" leaves playgoers with many questions and few answers.

Paul Werstine is Professor of English at the Graduate School and at King's University College at Western University. Series: Folger Shakespeare Library. Mass Market Paperback: 336 pages.

ISBN-13: 978-0743484916.

in the United States. It has the world's largest collection of the printed works of William Shakespeare, and is a primary repository for rare materials from the early modern period (1500–1750). The library was established by Henry Clay Folger in association with his wife, Emily Jordan Folger. It opened in 1932, two years after his death.

Measure for Measure is among the most passionately discussed of Shakespeare’s plays. In it, a duke temporarily removes himself from governing his city-state, deputizing a member of his administration, Angelo, to enforce the laws more rigorously. Angelo chooses as his first victim Claudio, condemning him to death because he impregnated Juliet before their marriage. Claudio’s sister Isabella, who is entering a convent, pleads for her brother’s life. Angelo attempts to extort sex from her, but Isabella preserves her chastity.

ISBN 0-7434-8277-8 Measure for Measure. See - Shakespeare-Apps/?CFID 60964246&CFTOKEN 32505279 These can be read only on Apple devices. Attendance: Students who are absent from more than 15% of classes (8 for the year) may, according to university senate regulations, be denied the chance to write the final exam.

The Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, . Hamlet The New Folger Library Shakespeare Series. William Shakespeare, Barbara A Mowat, Paul Werstine, PH D. Редакторы. Barbara A Mowat, Paul Werstine, PH D. Издатель. is home to the world's largest collection of Shakespeare's printed works, and a magnet for Shakespeare scholars from around the globe. In addition to exhibitions open to the public throughout the year, the Folger offers a full calendar of performances and programs. For more information, visit ww. olger. Perfection Learning Corporation, 2003.

Heaven doth with us as we with torches do, Not light them for themselves; for if our virtues Did not go forth of us, 'twere all alike As if we had them not. Spirits are not finely touch'd But to fine issues; nor Nature never lends The smallest scruple of her excellence But, like a thrifty goddess, sh. .

Hold, therefore, AngeloIn our remove be thou at full ourself; Mortality and mercy in Vienna Live in thy tongue and heart.

Measure for Measure is among the most passionately discussed of Shakespeare’s plays. In it, a duke temporarily removes himself from governing his city-state, deputizing a member of his administration, Angelo, to enforce the laws more rigorously. Angelo chooses as his first victim Claudio, condemning him to death because he impregnated Juliet before their marriage. Claudio’s sister Isabella, who is entering a convent, pleads for her brother’s life. Angelo attempts to extort sex from her, but Isabella preserves her chastity. The duke, in disguise, eavesdrops as she tells her brother about Angelo’s behavior, then offers to ally himself with her against Angelo. Modern responses to the play show how it can be transformed by its reception in present culture to evoke continuing fascination. To some, the duke (the government) seems meddlesome; to others, he is properly imposing moral standards. Angelo and Isabella’s encounter exemplifies sexual harassment. Others see a woman’s right to control her body in Isabella’s choice between her virginity and her brother’s life. The authoritative edition of Measure for Measure from The Folger Shakespeare Library, the trusted and widely used Shakespeare series for students and general readers, includes: -Freshly edited text based on the best early printed version of the play -Full explanatory notes conveniently placed on pages facing the text of the play -Scene-by-scene plot summaries -A key to the play’s famous lines and phrases -An introduction to reading Shakespeare’s language -An essay by a leading Shakespeare scholar providing a modern perspective on the play -Fresh images from the Folger Shakespeare Library’s vast holdings of rare books -An annotated guide to further reading Essay by Christy Desmet The Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, DC, is home to the world’s largest collection of Shakespeare’s printed works, and a magnet for Shakespeare scholars from around the globe. In addition to exhibitions open to the public throughout the year, the Folger offers a full calendar of performances and programs. For more information, visit Folger.edu.
Ffan
Written amidst Shakespeare's tragedies, "Measure For Measure" is the Bard's last comedy and perhaps his darkest. In all Shakespearean comedy, conflict, villainy, or immorality disrupt the moral order, but harmony ultimately prevails. Not so with this comedy. As one critic has it, "Measure" leaves playgoers with many questions and few answers. Or does it? More about that in a moment. First, about the title. It's from the Bible. In the Old Testament there's "breach for breach, eye for eye, tooth for tooth" (Leviticus 24). And, from the New Testament, "what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you again" (Mathew 5). It's the theme of the play, but, as we shall see, it never gets the results hoped for, until the very end, when, to quote from another of Shakespeare's plays, "mercy seasons justice."

The good Duke of Vienna, Vincentio, is concerned with the morals of his city. He enacts a number of reforms, then takes a sabbatical, and tells his deputy governor, Angelo, to see that the reforms are enforced. But Angelo goes too far: he enforces the law to the letter and shows no mercy for violators. Claudio is a victim of Angelo's strict enforcement policy. He's betrothed to Juliet, who is pregnant with his child. Because they are not yet married, he's arrested for fornication and sentenced to death by decapitation. Enter Isabella, Claudio's sister and the play's heroine. She's a young novice preparing to become a nun on the very day of his execution, and makes an appeal to Angelo for leniency. Her plea is reminiscent of Portia's words to Shylock in "The Merchant of Venice." "Merciful heaven, / Thou rather with thy sharp and sulfurous bolt / Splits the unwedgeable and gnarled oak / Than the soft myrtle; but man, proud man, / Dressed in a little brief authority, / Most ignorant of what he's most assured / His glassy essence, like an angry ape / Plays such fantastic tricks before high heaven / As makes the angels weep." As with Shylock, Angelo is unmoved. Rather, he offers to release Claudio in exchange for sex. Isabella refuses, even though it means her brother's death. "Better it were a brother died at once, than that a sister, by redeeming him, should die forever."

The good Duke, meanwhile, has not taken a sabbatical after all, but has been masquerading as a friar. But for what purpose? To determine if Angelo will do the right thing? Shakespeare doesn't say. He advises Isabella to trick Angelo by agreeing to meet with him and then sending another woman in her place. Enter Mariana. She was once betrothed to Angelo, until Angelo learned her dowry was lost at sea, at which point he called off the engagement. Mariana agrees to assume Isabella's identity and sleep with Angelo to secure Claudio's release. The bed trick goes as planned, but Angelo reneges on his promise and orders the immediate execution of Claudio. The Duke intervenes and Claudio is spared, but neither Angelo nor Isabella know this; they think Claudio is dead. The Duke then informs the deputy that he is returning home.

Angelo and court officials greet the Duke at the city gates. Isabella and Mariana are also there, and call upon the Duke to redress their wrongs. Instead, the Duke has Isabella arrested and orders Angelo to marry Mariana. Once they are married, he sentences Angelo to death for the murder of Claudio. At this point, Shakespeare takes some liberties that many think makes for an implausible and unsatisfactory ending. In his succinct and compelling book, "Shakespeare and Forgiveness," Professor William H. Matchett makes sense of the play's incongruities, as we shall see in a moment.

Isabella is released. Upon hearing of Angelo's death sentence, she goes before the Duke to plea for mercy. But instead of telling Isabella her brother is alive, the Duke proposes marriage. Nothing has prepared the audience for this. Matchett suggests: "The point is that Isabella must consider Claudio dead if Shakespeare is not to lose his big scene: her true saintliness is only shown in her forgiving Angelo despite her thinking he has killed Claudio. The Duke must remain an almost inhuman manipulator to keep her in this position. And so he does."

Isabella (kneeling): "Most bounteous sir, / Look, if it please you, on this man condemned, / As if my brother lived. I partly think / A due sincerity governed his deeds, / Till he did look on me. Since this is so, / Let him not die. My brother had but justice, / In that he did the thing for which he died. / For Angelo, / His act did not overtake his bad intent, / And must be buried but as an intent / That perished by the way. Thoughts are not subjects, / Intents but merely thoughts." The Duke pardons Angelo, and once again proposes marriage. Isabella answers with silence. Comments Matchett: "Shakespeare has staged a most dramatic forgiveness scene at the climax of his play, but at the cost of establishing Isabella's moral integrity by damaging the Duke's. It throws the whole mutuality of their marriage into doubt."

He adds: "Perhaps we should accept the created image without worrying about the Duke's character. . . . One has to admit, however, that the Duke's proposal--`I have a motion much imports your good'--is about as arrogantly self-centered as they come, while the silence with which Isabella meets it, Shakespeare having provided her with no response, has allowed many modern productions to substitute denial for consent. This no doubt violates the assumption of Shakespeare's play, but it allows recognition of the discomfort created by the forgiveness scene." The play ends with Isabella learning her brother is alive and well, but the question of her marrying the Duke is a matter of interpretation. However, in the final analysis, the full measure of forgiveness outweighs Angelo's measure of misdeeds, and trumps the play's defects.

The Folger Shakespeare Library edition of "Measure for Measure" is well edited, with explanations and commentaries that shed considerable light on the play. However, until reading Matchett's commentary (which I purchased separately), I too was discomfited with the play's ending. Four stars.
Dorintrius
Shakespeare's plays all have this uncanny ability to transcend time and place and say something to each generation of readers. This play in particular is especially relevant these days, considering how much there is on the news about sexual harassment and abuse of power. The latter topic is certainly a mainstay of Shakespeare's plays, but rarely does he ever examine the former topic so closely as he does in "Measure for Measure." A certain duke mysteriously leaves his duchy in the hands of an inexperienced cabinet member Angelo, who begins a relentless campaign against violators of decency laws. He closes all brothels, arrests all its patrons and employees and sentences Claudio to death for impregnating a woman out of wedlock. Claudio's only hope of escaping the hangman is his sister Isabella, who is drawn into a predicament of her own when she tries to intercede. Angelo demands that she "lay down the treasures of [her] body" in exchange for her brother's release, a quid-pro-quo that the soon-to-be nun Isabella cannot consider. How will Claudio be saved?

"Measure for Measure" has all the hallmarks of a Shakespeare comedy: disguises, dramatic irony, reversal of fortune, fools, double entendres. There is even the appearance of a prostitute! The play also looks into some rather serious issues such as the law and its impact on society. Sometimes those who are least guilty are most affected by the law. Rulers often make themselves above the law and violate it even as they enforce it. As in "Merchant of Venice," characters must work in mysterious ways for justice to be served. And only Shakespeare can serve up justice in a stew of hypocrisy and misplaced blame like this.

I have to say that while this is an incredibly rewarding read, the notes are an absolute must, as there are often lines which don't make any sense (because of omissions and the like). The Folgers books have done an amazing job at patching the uneven spots where they occur and offering reasonable interpretations for awkward lines. Of course, such miniscule issues are a small price to pay for reading the author of the finest works in human history.

What escapes me is why this play does not have a more prominent place in the canon. Could it be the aforementioned textual gaps? Could it be the all-too-tidy conclusion? Could it be that none of the characters really stands out more than any other? After all, not every play can have a Falstaff or an Iago or a Shylock or Prospero. And not every play can have existentialist soliloquys or supernatural elements like Hamlet or Macbeth. If one is prepared to accept what is "lacking" in "Measure for Measure," one will quickly see that there is still much to find in its place.
Zymbl
Folgers library is great when looking to read Shakespeare. They provide very detailed notes to help explain his writings.
Ielonere
Great
Fog
great additional information
Falya
good book.
Danial
This was the perfect companion to help me with scene work. As an actor who has done little Shakespeare, this was a handy go-to reference to help clear up uncertainty in a scene.
Dealing with heavy issues such as the fear of eternal torment after death, and the frequency which sin and immorality are rewarded instead of punished in life. Measure for Measure, has some dark themes for certain but still manages to be one of my favorite comedies. Perhaps because this sobriety adds depth or simply because it includes some of Shakespeare's best pimp and prostitute based comic relief, I really enjoyed Measure for Measure. A must read for any Shakespeare lover!
Measure for Measure (Folger Shakespeare Library) ebook
Author:
Dr. Barbara A. Mowat,Paul Werstine Ph.D.,William Shakespeare
Category:
Poetry
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1246 kb
FB2 size:
1433 kb
DJVU size:
1444 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster; 58029th edition (July 1, 2005)
Rating:
4.9
Other formats:
mobi lit azw txt
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