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Pallbearers Envying the One Who Rides (Poets, Penguin) ebook

by Stephen Dobyns


Stephen Dobyns was born on February 19, 1941, in Orange, New Jersey. His books of poetry include Concurring Beasts, Heat Death, Common Carnage, Pallbearers Envying the One Who Rides, The Porcupine's Kisses, and Winter's Journey.

Stephen Dobyns was born on February 19, 1941, in Orange, New Jersey. in 1964 from Wayne State University and an . in 1967 from the University of Iowa. He was a reporter for the Detroit News and has taught at several colleges and universities including Sarah Lawrence College, Warren Wilson College, the University of Iowa, Syracuse University, and Boston University. He has received several awards including the Melville Cane Award for Cemetery Nights.

Great J Stephen Dobyns, Pallbearers Envying the One Who Rides . It's what drew me to Dobyns' tenth book of poetry. Stephen Dobyns once again proves that he is the greatest living modern poet.

Great J Stephen Dobyns, Pallbearers Envying the One Who Rides (Penguin, 1999). What a great name for a book. Ain't it? It's what drew me to Dobyns' tenth book of poetry. Once I cracked the cover, his long-limbed, loose-jointed style kept me going: Heart considers the nature of fairness- how some folks get pearls, others pebbles. A rock falls out of the sky, who it smacks is anyone's guess-butcher, crook, or priest. Heart is struck by the unfairness of fairness.

Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 10 years ago. Stephen Dobyns, Pallbearers Envying the One Who Rides (Penguin, 1999) What a great name for a book. Once I cracked the cover, his long-limbed, loose-jointed style kept me going: "Heart considers the nature of fairness- how some folks get pearls, others pebbles. Stephen Dobyns is one of the best American poets writing today, and here he gives us an incredibly rewarding collection-the kind that you want to lock yourself in your room with and chew on for hours. Sly, Wise, Hilarious: Dobyns at his utter best. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 19 years ago.

Stephen J. Dobyns (born February 19, 1941) is an American poet and . Bradshaw is unusual as a private eye protagonist, an ordinary man who was once a police officer. Pallbearers Envying the One Who Rides (1999). The Porcupine's Kisses (2002). Dobyns (born February 19, 1941) is an American poet and novelist born in Orange, New Jersey, and residing in Westerly, R. .1 Charlie Bradshaw series. All the books have the word "Saratoga" in the title.

Stephen Dobyns - The author of numerous collections of poetry and novels, Stephen . Dobyns has published ten books of poetry and twenty novels.

Stephen Dobyns - The author of numerous collections of poetry and novels, Stephen Dobyns was the recipient of the Lamont Poetry Selection in 1972. 2000)Pallbearers Envying the One Who Rides (Penguin, 1999); Common Carnage (1996); Velocities: New and Selected Poems, 1966-1992 (1994); Cemetery Nights (1987), which won a Melville Cane Award; Black Dog, Red Dog (1984), which was a winner in the National Poetry Series; Heat Death (1980); and Concurring Beasts (1972). which was the 1972 Lamont Poetry Selection of The Academy of American Poets.

Pallbearers Envying the One Who Rides. Velocities: New and Selected Poems, 1966–1992. You are supporting writers and allowing Penguin to continue to publish books for every reader. Blue Rider Press is a registered trademark and its colophon is a trademark of Penguin Random House LLC.

Читать бесплатно Boy in the Water Stephen Dobyns. Текст этой книги доступен онлайн: ith what is out there but also with what we find (or don’t find) within ourselves. Booklist Mr. Dobyns is a masterly poet and shrewd mystery writer

Читать бесплатно Boy in the Water Stephen Dobyns. Dobyns is a masterly poet and shrewd mystery writer. moody and evocatively written

Stephen J. Dobyns (born February 19, 1941) is an American . New York: Penguin, 1996. Pallbearers Envying the One Who Rides. New York: Penguin, 1999. Dobyns (born February 19, 1941) is an American poet and novelist. Was born on February 19, 1941 in Orange, New Jersey, to Lester L. Dobyns, a minister, and Barbara Johnston, and raised in New Jersey, Michigan, Virginia, and Pennsylvania. The Porcupine's Kisses.

Stephen Dobyns has published over a dozen volumes of poetry .

Stephen Dobyns has published over a dozen volumes of poetry, including Concurring Beasts (1972), The Balthus Poems (1982), Cemetery Nights (1987) . Stephen Dobyns has published over a dozen volumes of poetry, including Concurring Beasts (1972), The Balthus Poems (1982), Cemetery Nights (1987), Velocities: New and Selected Poems (1994), Pallbearers Envying the One Who Rides (1999), and The Day's Last Light Reddens the Leaves of the Copper Beech (2016).

Praise for Boy in the Water Once again, Dobyns has offered readers a thriller that is swift and smart and very, very spooky. The Washington Post Book World A shivery whodunit. USA Today Dobyns creates a haunted, troubled realm. The Providence Sunday Journal Nasty fun. -Daily News The author has thoroughly mixed several genres-horror, the fiction of personal crisis, suspense-into a weird and original concoction that is highly entertaining

With his signature wit and insight, award-winning poet Stephen Dobyns probes the secrets of the heartConsider the mysteries of the heart, that blood-pumping organ and, in Stephen Dobyns' latest collection of poems, the hapless romantic of our interior landscape. "The Himalayas Within Him" finds Heart worrying about the sound of his own heartbeat, wondering why it doesn't "blare like a quartet of trombones" as it reflects his "ardent complexity." In "Goodbye to the Hands That Have Touched Him" Heart, after suffering many sleepless nights, decides "that love exists at the root of his problems. Without love his path would be as smooth as a plate of glass and he'd sleep like a kitten." Dividing the Heart poems is the long "Oh, Immobility, Death's Vast Associate," a jazzy disquisition on human isolation and inaction in the midst of a planet full of people feeling similarly. Throughout Pallbearers Envying the One Who Rides Dobyns has painstakingly sculpted straightforward language into a distinct sound, creating an unforgettable collection of poems that offers readers unexpected revelations about the complexities of the heart. . . . Why is Heart alone in the chest? Because hope is an aspect of the single conditionand without hope, why move our feet? To see himselfas purely a fragment: such is Heart's obligation. Let's quickly depart before we learn what happens. Sometimes a car stops. Sometimes there is nothing.--from "Like a Revolving Door"
Tolrajas
Dobyns is one of the most brilliant poets of the late 20th century (and still kicking ass in this one!). Pallbearers is one of my favorites, arguab ly one of his best. The poems are long, thick-lined, richly textured. Witty, insightful, searing. These narrative poems speak from the POV of "Heart"--a character that speaks for man, men, from the various iterations of what a heart might be--an organ, broken, longing, struggling. This is 1 of the books I like to give to my men-friends who think they don't like poetry. You can't not like these poems!
TheSuspect
Mr. Dobyns produces a thoughtful, humorous catalog of poetry centered on the character known only as "Heart." Love, disease, sex, pain and death follow Heart through life. His observations range from appropriate to astounding. A favorite passage in "To Exist in the Given Minute":

"But these fixations with past and future: resentment and anger occupying the antiquity of one's life, while desire and anxiety point ahead-how they badger the here and now, until every particle of time gets packed in the pint-sized second, making the single jiffy impossibly fat, yet providing no room for Heart. Now has no time for now, which leads heart to catapult forward or dwell in the past, which is not a solution but only increases his confusion."

A fine read.
Nern
Stephen Dobyns, Pallbearers Envying the One Who Rides (Penguin, 1999)

What a great name for a book. Ain't it? It's what drew me to Dobyns' tenth book of poetry. Once I cracked the cover, his long-limbed, loose-jointed style kept me going:

"Heart considers the nature of fairness--
how some folks get pearls, others pebbles.
A rock falls out of the sky, who it smacks
is anyone's guess--butcher, crook, or priest.
Heart is struck by the unfairness of fairness.
What does it mean to deserve something?"
("Great Job")

The book is separated into three sections. The first and third are the Heart poems, a series of pieces (all in this style, with no stanza breaks, each running about a page and a half) about a character called Heart and his views on life. The middle section, "Oh Immobility, Death's Vast Associate", is one much longer piece in the same style. It doesn't hold up quite as well, for as you can tell from the excerpt above, these poems do almost as much telling as showing, and the longer the piece gets, the greater the chance it will become overwhelmed with its own exposition. The shorter poems, however, often strike the perfect balance. There is a good deal of fun to be had here, and, especially as Heart grows older in the later poems, a good deal of wisdom as well. Fun stuff, this. *** ½
Otrytrerl
dobyns writes about heart, his search for love and his daily musings on various topics. i'm not a rabid fan of any of the collection, but there are some nice lines here and there.
it's safe to say that heart is a simpleton, not unlike the organ itself, he's not smart like brain, as he confesses in one poem, he's preoccupied by acquiring love, seldom thinking of the possible repercussions: he covers his ceiling with mistletoe in "what good is love unless it's aggressive?"; he visits a beach where he forgoes both swimming and napping "lest he miss some beauty adjust a strap or hitch her halter up" in "the dark and turbulent sea"; he wonders, in "lumberjack shirts and motorcycle boots", if he should beef up in order to attract more suitors; in "flawed language: thought's shadow" he constructs an elaborate metallic valentine, weighing ten pounds, at a blacksmith shop after growing tired of his five-a-day regimen of writing letters of devotion to women, which has thus proved futile. however, he remains, always, at a distance from those that he pursues, even when he visits a whorehouse he prefers to discuss love rather than make it.
throughout the collection, heart's own naivete repeatedly gets the best of him. in "one good turn deserves another", after offering to lug his friends' burdens so they can enjoy a few hours without impediments he's still circling the track months later. another poem finds him encouraging passersby with "great job", after wondering about the discrepancies in alloted fairness; needless to say, they look at him as if he were crazy. in "adrift in the leafy tranquility" heart opens his home to a dragon but soon wishes he were alone when the dragon keeps him up all night with stories about his life.
the poems are all from about a page to a page and a half in length, except for the rambling and utterly hopeless twenty-page meditation on human laziness (and motion) "oh, immobility, death's vast associate" which divides the heart poems into two sections. the pieces are easily digested, but not entirely satisfying -- there's always something to dislike, particularly his overuse of colloquialisms, such as "up the wazoo" and "prick", which only work occasionally (and possibly only in the first line of a poem, as is the case with "after heart's pal frank gets mushed in a car wreck" in "god's poorer particle, i.e., the devil" (other poems begin with a friend getting "nixed by a stroke" and with a lover's breast being "lopped off", so maybe i can only appreciate when death or injury are treated indifferently)). very few of the poems can be read without wincing, which is odd, not to mention unacceptable, though most provide something (insight, a playful line) to balance the scales.
an average work, more interesting for its theme as a whole than any of its parts.
Rigiot
Few books of poetry these days have such a sense of unity as this. Heart is a character that you follow from poem to poem as you might get caught up in the plot of a novel. Each poem stands on its own, too, with engaging and exciting language and a tone which ranges from wickedly funny to touchingly melancholy--sometimes being both at the same time. Stephen Dobyns is one of the best American poets writing today, and here he gives us an incredibly rewarding collection--the kind that you want to lock yourself in your room with and chew on for hours.
Pallbearers Envying the One Who Rides (Poets, Penguin) ebook
Author:
Stephen Dobyns
Category:
Poetry
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1230 kb
FB2 size:
1284 kb
DJVU size:
1220 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Penguin Books; 1st edition (October 1, 1999)
Pages:
160 pages
Rating:
4.6
Other formats:
mobi lrf mbr lit
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