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Nebula Awards Showcase 2000: The Year's Best SF and Fantasy Chosen by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America ebook

by Gregory Benford


The Nebula Awards are the Academy Awards of science fiction: the finest works in the genre each year as voted by the .

The Nebula Awards are the Academy Awards of science fiction: the finest works in the genre each year as voted by the members of SFWA, the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. Nebula Awards Showcase 2000 is a thought-provoking and entertaining volume of and about science fiction.

Nebula Awards Showcase 2000 book.

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Gathers winning science fiction and fantasy works by authors such as Paul Anderson and Jane Nolan, and highlights essays discussing science fiction's place in literature. Genre: Science Fiction. Similar books by other authors. Nebula Awards 31 (Nebula Award Stories, book 31) Pamela Sargent. Nebula Awards Showcase 2001 (Nebula Awards Showcase, book 2) Robert Silverberg.

Nebula Awards Showcase 2000: The Year's Best Science Fiction and Fantasy Chosen by the Science-Fiction and Fantasy Writers of Amer. A collection of the best of the fiction and poetry that earned 1999 Nebula Awards, bestowed by the Sciencefiction and Fantasy Writers of America, includes original essays on the latest achievements in the genre and stories by Jane Yolen, Joe Haldeman, Geoffrey A. Landis, and other notables.

Each Nebula Awards collection showcases the year's Nebula-winning fiction, top selections from the ballot-including work .

Each Nebula Awards collection showcases the year's Nebula-winning fiction, top selections from the ballot-including work not collected in other best-of-the-year anthologies-and intriguing essays written expressly for each volume.

Nebula Award Showcase is a series of annual science fiction and fantasy anthologies collecting stories that have won or been nominated for the Nebula Award, awarded by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), a nonprofit association.

Nebula Award Showcase is a series of annual science fiction and fantasy anthologies collecting stories that have won or been nominated for the Nebula Award, awarded by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), a nonprofit association of professional science fiction and fantasy writers founded in 1965 by Damon Knight as the Science Fiction Writers of America.

The Nebula Award for Best Novel is given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA) for science fiction or fantasy novels. A work of fiction is defined by the organization as a novel if it is 40,000 words or longer; awards are also given out for pieces of shorter lengths in the categories of short story, novelette, and novella. To be eligible for Nebula Award consideration a novel must be published in English in the United States

Nebula Awards Showcase 2000. Published April 21, 2000 by Harcourt. There's no description for this book yet.

Nebula Awards Showcase 2000. The Year's Best SF and Fantasy Chosen by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America.

The Nebula Awards are the Academy Awards of science fiction: the finest works in the genre each year as voted by the members of SFWA, the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. Nebula Awards Showcase 2000 is a thought-provoking and entertaining volume of and about science fiction. Editor Gregory Benford speaks of the interaction between science fiction and science over the past century; editors and authors Jonathan Lethem, Gordon Van Gelder, George Zebrowski, David Hartwell, and Bill Warren discuss-and disagree about-science fiction's place in the larger literary scene; authors William Tenn and Hal Clement are honored; and award-winning stories are presented by Sheila Finch, Jane Yolen, Bruce Holland Rogers, Joe Haldeman (an excerpt from his novel Forever Peace), Geoffrey A. Landis, Walter Jon Williams, and Mark J. McGarry.
Dogrel
I found the stories in this book to be forgettable and bland. I read Asimov a lot and this stories do not come even near the quality of his writing. I can't believe they were put in an awards showcase. Some of them are good, but mostly are so so.
Monin
If you aren't familiar with the Nebula Awards series of books, you don't know what you are missing!
This anthology series collects the best science fiction of the previous year as voted by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, and their choices are usually on the money. I've been buying this compendium every year for the last five or six years, and I read it frequently before that -- when I could find a copy. First off, this 34th in the series is edited by Gregory Benford, author of Timescape.
This series used to have a regular editor, Pamela Sargent, and while Mr. Benford has done a capable job with Nebula Awards 34 -- I do wish Pamela Sargent would return as editor to this series. I found her work to be more consistent, and some of her choices more unique, than the three editors (Jack Dann, Connie Willis, Gregory Benford) that have handled the anthology under a rotating editorship ever since her departure.
Over a course of time, a rotating editorship just does not have the authoritative power or retain the cohesive voice of a series, and I think certain values are lost when a collection such as this is not tended to by a single editor. Of the last three issues in the anthology, I would have to say Jack Dann did the best job -- so if Pamela Sargent is never to return as editor to this series -- I do wish that Jack Dann would be made the permanent editor.
Of the one novella, six stories, nine essays, and two poems presented here, I would say there are three outstanding items -- the novella "Reading the Bones" by Sheila Finch, the story "Winter Fire" by Geoffrey A. Landis, and the story "Lethe" by Walter Jon Williams.
Sheila Finch has written a novella "Reading the Bones" (another in her Lingster series) that is simply stellar. The plot revolves around Ries Danyo, a substance-addicted linguist stranded on the alien planet Krishna, trying to save both his life and the lives of the two daughters of his employers, who have already been murdered by the natives. The whole novella, really an analysis of the development of languages both spoken and written, is all the more terrifying when you realize that ancient cultures actually used human bones to develop the characters of the written Chinese language just like the aliens in this story do to develop their Frehti alphabet. A very satisfying read indeed, and I look forward to more by this author.
Dr. Geoffrey Landis (he helped build the Sojourner rover that explored Mars in 1997) has contributed perhaps the most powerful story, "Winter Fire", the ruminations of a 112 year old Japanese survivor of a war in Salzburg, Austria in 2108. The story of her girlhood struggle for order and survival, and the ultimate fate of her foster-father Johann Achtenberg is enough to bring tears to the eyes. The parallels between this story and the present day wars in Bosnia and other parts of Eastern Europe are not to be ignored. Stories like this make you think, "Where are we all headed?"
The third standout, "Lethe" by Walter Jon Williams, is the most challenging read of this anthology. This story of clones, far space travel, shared identity, and permutations of relationships continually loops back in on itself and accelerates with every return. I have no doubt that men and women would have an entirely different take on this story, and I encourage couples to read it together and write a "His" and "Her" response to this story. This could make for some potent conversation. Do not blame me for the result, if you do as I suggest.
Of the items that do not sing in this anthology, Jane Yolen's "Lost Girls" seems most out of place -- because frankly it is the one clearly token fantasy story here. I found this one difficult to read, and while I like some of this authors previous work -- I find too much of "Lost Girls" to be derivative.
The five essays about the SF genre, while seminally engaging, are not inspired. Only Jonathan Lethem's has fire, and thank God for people like Jonathan Lethem. I wish they would drop the Rhysling Award winners altogether.. this marriage of science fiction and poetry is always awkward and has never really worked for me.. again a case of tokenism. Don't get me wrong, I really love poetry, but it just does not work here.
What the Nebula Awards often does do best is to look back in time, and to look back at times in the genre, and hail the work of a "grandmaster", someone that has contributed greatly to the field and that oftentimes has gone unacknowledged for many years, to reward them with the place that befits them in history.
I have learned much from reading the Nebula Award series, and I have discovered many great talents on the literary horizon. I would not have discovered Maureen McHugh, Martha Soukup, Paul Di Filippo, Elizabeth Hand, Lisa Goldstein, Paul Levinson, or Jerry Oltion without this series, or if I had -- it would have taken me a lot longer to find them.
Many great talents are published in this series when they are young and unknown, or when they are old and nearly forgotten. Such a shaping makes this anthology fertile ground, and a good place to watch if you hope to become a writer now or in the future. Reviewing many issues of this anthology in one sitting, it helps you to see certain market trends in the kinds of writings that are published, that are lauded, and that are accessible. Miss this book at your own peril!
Anayajurus
If you like science fiction short stories, the annual Nebula award compilations are always a good buy. The selections are sometimes a bit quirky, and this year I did think some of the runner-up stories were stronger than the winner, but they're always interesting. Collect the whole set!
Chankane
I gave this book one star because of one error
that made me wonder if the money was well spent. The
first edition of the paperback version that I received
was missing pp. 228-260. Effectively making one fifth
of the book, 2 short stories and 3 other sections,
qualify as missing or incomplete.
The stories that were there ranged from interesting
to less than expected.
INCOMPLETE SHORT STORIES:
'The Mercy Gate' by Mark j. McGarry
'Uncommon Sense' by Hal Clement
Nebula Awards Showcase 2000: The Year's Best SF and Fantasy Chosen by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America ebook
Author:
Gregory Benford
Category:
Short Stories & Anthologies
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1462 kb
FB2 size:
1531 kb
DJVU size:
1708 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; First Edition edition (April 21, 2000)
Pages:
320 pages
Rating:
4.1
Other formats:
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