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Snapshots from Hell: The Making of an MBA ebook

by Peter Robinson


Brilliant, funny, and profound, Snapshots from Hell follows Robinson from his first harrowing days at maths camp . Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read.

Brilliant, funny, and profound, Snapshots from Hell follows Robinson from his first harrowing days at maths camp through the dizzying phalanx of core courses, the frenzy of the exam week, the pitfalls and triumphs of the interview process (including a surreal interview with Robert Maxwell) to being wined and dined by some of the most prestigious companies in the world. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Peter Robinson’s Snapshots from Hell is a hilarious and enlightening insider’s answer to the paramount question every prospective student asks: what is business school really like? During his frenetic first year at Stanford.

Peter Robinson’s Snapshots from Hell is a hilarious and enlightening insider’s answer to the paramount question every prospective student asks: what is business school really like? During his frenetic first year at Stanford Business School. Snapshots from Hell: The Making of an MBA Paperback – April 26, 2005. by. Peter Robinson (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central.

Snapshots From Hell book. Peter Robinson’s Snapshots from Hell is a hilarious and enlightening insider’s answer to the paramount question every prospective student asks: what is business school really like?

Snapshots From Hell book. Peter Robinson’s Snapshots from Hell is a hilarious and enlightening insider’s answer to the paramount question every prospective student asks: what is business school really like? During his frenetic first year at Stanford Business School, Peter Robinson began keeping a journal of his day-to-day impressions which evolved into this book.

In Snapshots from Hell, we follow Robinson from his first harrowing days at "math camp" through his valiant, sometimes triumphant, sometimes futile attempts to navigate his way through a dizzying phalanx of core courses. We see what business school does to Robinson's up-and-down, long-distance romance.

For other people named Peter Robinson, see Peter Robinson (disambiguation)

For other people named Peter Robinson, see Peter Robinson (disambiguation). The journal he kept of his two-year experience there was the basis for his book Snapshots from Hell: The Making of an MBA, published in 1994, which details the considerable difficulty he encountered during the first year of business school due to his lack of a "quantitative background". In the early 1990s, Robinson joined the News Corporation run by Rupert Murdoch, and then served as press secretary to the Chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Robinson, Peter, 1957-. Robinson, Peter, 1957-, Stanford University. Graduate School of Business, Estudiantes de comercio. New York : Warner Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana.

Peter Robinson's DCI Banks is now a major ITV1 drama starring Stephen Tompkinson (Wild at Heart, Ballykissangel) as Inspector Banks, and Andrea Lowe (The Bill, Murphy's Law) as DI Annie Cabbot

Peter Robinson's DCI Banks is now a major ITV1 drama starring Stephen Tompkinson (Wild at Heart, Ballykissangel) as Inspector Banks, and Andrea Lowe (The Bill, Murphy's Law) as DI Annie Cabbot. Peter's standalone novel BEFORE THE POISON won the IMBA's 2013 Dilys Award as well as the 2012 Arthur Ellis Award for Best Novel by the Crime Writers of Canada. This was Peter's sixth Arthur Ellis award. His critically acclaimed DCI Banks novels have won numerous awards in Britain, the United States, Canada and Europe, and are published in translation all over the world

He graduated with an MBA in 1990.

He graduated with an MBA in 1990. Robinson then spent a year in New York City with Fox Television, reporting to the owner of the company, Rupert Murdoch. Peter Robinson: 1989: Lessons From The Fall Of The Berlin Wall.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Snapshots from Hell: Making of an. .Author: Peter Robinson ISBN 10: 1857880803.

Author: Peter Robinson ISBN 10: 1857880803. Used-Very Good: The book will be clean without any major stains or markings, the spine will be in excellent shape with only minor creasing, no pages will be missing and the cover is likely to be very clean. Read full description. See details and exclusions.

the making of an MBA. by Peter Robinson. Not Inspector Banks (different Peter Robinson). Snapshots from Hell: Making of an MBA. Published 1994 by Warner Books in New York About the Book. Classifications. 092, B. Library of Congress.

Based on the daily diary Peter Robinson kept at Stanford Business School, and peppered with a cast of unforgettable characters and situations, Snapshots from Hell answers the perennial question "What is business school really like?" as it recounts the author's own precarious, exhilarating and sleepless quest for the coveted MBA degree.
Thorgahuginn
One of the best books ever written on the MBA experience. Not quite "Paper Chase", but a worthy read for anyone interested in attending a top flight MBA program. Very few people will ever see the inside of the Stanford GSB, but the takeaways from Peter's memoir are universal. Well worth the read.
nadness
This book was great. With the exception of having prior business experience, Snapshots was 99% accurate to what my MBA experience has been like. I'm finishing up my first year at Top-20 B-School on the East Coast and Snapshots was like a play-by-play of what I've been through. I've read some of the other reviews trashing the book (the Med School guy for instance) and I think they're taking it a little too seriously. The author uses "poets" so he doesn't have to keep repeating "those of us without prior business experience". And in real life, you do notice differences between those who HAD prior business experience and those who didn't. I didn't pick up any strong political overtones in the book so again, the Med School guy needs to relax. I also didn't think Snapshots was written to be overly dramatic and engage the Med and Law school types in a pissing contest over whos gradschool program is the toughest. This book gives an honest account for what your first-year of business school will be like and I've recommended it to all my friends considering that path.
The Sinners from Mitar
This book is quite entertaining to the prospective MBA student. However, Mr. Robinson spends quite a bit of time lamenting how he's a "poet" (someone who cannot handle the quantitative subjects) and in over his head. While this situation makes for good comedy, it is not very helpful for those of us entering an MBA program and reasonably confident in our quantitative skills and knowledgeable about our reason for pursuing a business career. Overall, a good quick read.
Awene
If you ever went to grad school, you will love this book. Even 25 years on, its still true. I could identify with all of it. Robinson is witty, well read, and classy.
Enila
Just wanted to let everyone know that I really appreciate the seller and how fast the book came. It was in perfect condition when I received it. As far as the book goes, it was easy reading and went quickly. The author comes off as a bit of a whiner, but it isn't too bad.
JOIN
A timeless journey of an MBA! Still relevant today!
GAMER
I couldn't finish this book. There were several issues that led me to toss it by the middle of the book:

1) The author must use the word "Poet" at least three or four time PER PAGE. Ok. We get it. You were considered a Poet. Get over it. Stop using that as an excuse as to why you didn't seem to understand one lousy math concept.

2) The book is highly over-dramatized. Either this guy has the IQ of a Rhesus monkey, or he tried to make it sound a lot harder than it was. I'm a physician - and I'm pretty sure that medical school is harder than business school - and I didn't have near the "harrowing experience" this guy did.

3) I was looking for a book about what an MBA program is like - not a thinly disguised political ad. Being that this guy was a speech writer for Reagan and Bush #1, I should have known to expect some conservative drivel. What I didn't expect was several passages referring to "leftists", "liberals", "hippies", and the like. The passages are spread out throughout the book (as much as I read of it), but there is NO POINT to them. They add absolutely nothing to the story, and appear to be thrown in there just to make sure that we know the author disapproves of non-conservatives.

In the end, it was the political bias that drove me to stop reading. The book was mediocre, at best, to begin with, and the neo-conservative ravings put the nail in the coffin.

If you are a proud Republican, you may find this book to be alright. If you are an independent or Democrat, though, I would recommend you skip this one unless you enjoy being insulted.
I read this book just as I started B-school and it scared me well and good. Like Robinson I was a "poet", meaning I was a liberal arts major among financial and engineering types. I can certainly empathize with Robinson's struggles to grasp the more quantitative disciplines of business, since I went through my own miserable times. But I think the review right before me makes a good point, that getting IN to business school is the hard part, especially for an elite program like Stanford. The school certainly doesn't want students to flunk out or struggle too much, since all that does is hurt the school's precious statistics. While business school ain't a picnic, it isn't the trial of tears that Robinson makes it out to be.
But the book is entertaining enough, and even though Robinson was a speechwriter for President Reagan and writers for Republican presidents tend to be an especially odious sort, he seems a decent guy. One problem that Robinson identified and I heartily agree with is the lack of, well, overall intelligence and awareness in business school students. I'll readily admit that I can't crunch numbers as well as many of my former classmates, but I was amazed at how ignorant many of the folks in school were. They had no idea who Larry Ellison was. Discussions about government policy rarely went above a 10th-grade level. My ethics class was a revelation. I don't think anyone else in my class ever studied philosophy and it seemed like they looked at ethics as an obstacle to be hurdled rather than as a code to define proper behavior. Depressing stuff.
But Robinson made it through B-school, and so did I (in my case, barely. Going part-time and working full-time while planning a wedding was a pain the rear. Can't imagine folks who go to school when they have little kids. Insane). The only problem with this book now is how dated it is. Robinson went to B-school in the heart of Silicon Valley, yet the words "e-commerce" and "dot.com" are nowhere to be found in the book. Robinson and his fellow students interviewed with the usual investment banks, which today almost seems quaint. What, no one dropped out to found a company that had a multibillion dollar IPO six months later?
All in all a good read, but if you're thinking about getting your MBA I don't think this is a totally accurate picture of what you're going to endure. Still, it's well worth a read.
Snapshots from Hell: The Making of an MBA ebook
Author:
Peter Robinson
Category:
Medicine
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1318 kb
FB2 size:
1446 kb
DJVU size:
1696 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Grand Central Publishing; Reprint edition (August 1, 1995)
Pages:
304 pages
Rating:
4.7
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