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Auditory Neuroscience: Making Sense of Sound (The MIT Press) ebook

by Israel Nelken,Andrew J. King,Jan Schnupp


The MIT Press Cambridge, Massachusetts London, England

The MIT Press Cambridge, Massachusetts London, England. Schnupp, Jan, 1966– Auditory neuroscience : making sense of sound, Jan Schnupp, Israel Nelken, and Andrew King. Preface vii 1 Why Things Sound the Way They Do 1 2 The Ear 51 3 Periodicity and Pitch Perception: Physics, Psychophysics, and Neural Mechanisms 93 4 Hearing Speech 139 5 Neural Basis of Sound Localization 177 6 Auditory Scene Analysis 223 7 Development, Learning, and Plasticity 269 8 Auditory Prostheses: From the Lab to the Clinic and Back Again 295 Notes 321.

Auditory Neuroscience. Making Sense of Sound. By Jan Schnupp, Israel Nelken and Andrew J. King

Auditory Neuroscience. King. This excellent book is valuable in providing a detailed view of auditory neuroscience. Pragmatics and Cognition.

Schupp, Nelken, and King simply do a fantastic job of not only creating an informative book about the . The book is divided into 8 parts covering various aspects of the auditory system and I will cover what I felt was most relevant.

Schupp, Nelken, and King simply do a fantastic job of not only creating an informative book about the complicated and intricate system of processing sound, but make it interesting and simple enough for just about anyone to read. When I first purchased the book, I assumed it would be a textbook not just because of it look, but just the title in general sounded like I was in for a long and dull road ahead. They begin the book with an overview of the process, followed by a step by step process from the ear to how the sounds are learned.

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Israel Nelken is Associate Professor and Head of the Laboratory of Auditory Neurophysiology in the Department of Neurobiology in the Andrew Silberman Institute of Life Sciences at Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Andrew King, Israel Nelken, Jan Schnupp. Place of Publication. Israel Nelken is Associate Professor and Head of the Laboratory of Auditory Neurophysiology in the Department of Neurobiology in the Andrew Silberman Institute of Life Sciences at Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Auditory Neuroscience - Jan Schnupp - Free ebook download as PDF File . df) . Auditory Neuroscience Making Sense of Sound

Auditory Neuroscience - Jan Schnupp - Free ebook download as PDF File . df), Text File . xt) or read book online for free. Auditory Neuroscience Making Sense of Sound. Jan Schnupp, Israel Nelken, and Andrew King. The MIT Press Cambridge, Massachusetts London, England. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form by any electronic or mechanical means (including photocopying, recording, or information storage and retrieval) without permission in writing from the publisher. edu This book was set in Stone Sans and Stone Serif by Toppan Best-set Premedia Limited.

Jan Schnupp, Israel Nelken, Andrew King. An integrated overview of hearing and the interplay of physical, biological, and psychological processes underlying it. Every time we listen-to speech, to music, to footsteps approaching or retreating-our auditory perception is the result of a long chain of diverse and intricate processes that unfold within the source of the sound itself, in the air, in our ears, and, most of all, in our brains. Hearing is an "everyday miracle" that, despite its staggering complexity, seems effortless.

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Auditory Neuroscience Making Sense of Sound.

An integrated overview of hearing and the interplay of physical, biological, and psychological processes underlying it.

Every time we listen―to speech, to music, to footsteps approaching or retreating―our auditory perception is the result of a long chain of diverse and intricate processes that unfold within the source of the sound itself, in the air, in our ears, and, most of all, in our brains. Hearing is an "everyday miracle" that, despite its staggering complexity, seems effortless. This book offers an integrated account of hearing in terms of the neural processes that take place in different parts of the auditory system.

Because hearing results from the interplay of so many physical, biological, and psychological processes, the book pulls together the different aspects of hearing―including acoustics, the mathematics of signal processing, the physiology of the ear and central auditory pathways, psychoacoustics, speech, and music―into a coherent whole.

Melipra
In this review I will give an overview of Auditory Neuroscience, my general opinion of the book, and then break down the book into sections to further dissect it. This is intended to give potential readers a chance to understand what the book explains and to what level the reader might want to be familiar with neuroscience before reading.

Schupp, Nelken, and King simply do a fantastic job of not only creating an informative book about the complicated and intricate system of processing sound, but make it interesting and simple enough for just about anyone to read. When I first purchased the book, I assumed it would be a textbook not just because of it look, but just the title in general sounded like I was in for a long and dull road ahead. And while this book is chuck full of factual information, it maintains a colloquial feel, leaving it interesting to the reader. Needless to say, I am glad I was wrong. So, I would recommend this book to not just people studying neuroscience, but anyone who is interested in the inner workings of the brain. It breaks down the core scientific concepts of how the brain processes sound into easy to understand language.

The book is divided into 8 parts covering various aspects of the auditory system and I will cover what I felt was most relevant. They begin the book with an overview of the process, followed by a step by step process from the ear to how the sounds are learned.

"Why Things Sound the Way They Do"
They begin by explaining the differences between the sounds used in labs and the sounds heard in the real world. They sum the differences down to one distinct reason: vibration. The vibrations of different objects lend us to be able to tell the difference between materials, speeds, and other properties of the source. All of a sudden as I am reading this section, they throw a bunch of trig and algebra at me and I was taken aback by the sudden shift in speech. They then close the section with, "Does this sound a little complicated and awkward?"..."Our ears have no such difficulty". This introduces the book's feel to the reader and let's the reader know the complexity at which our brain and ear perform. The rest of the chapter explains different types of spectrograms, and just how they process sound.

"The Ear"
Now that the components of sound are thoroughly explained to the reader, the authors detail how those sounds are processed once they reach the ear. This chapter starts more as a physiology lesson more than neuroscience, but for good reason. They do a great job of getting to the point for every stage of the ear and what its job is. They make good comparisons to other animals that have better hearing and why that is so. The more notable parts of the ear in this book are the basal membrane and the cochlea. The authors explain how these parts take a sound and turn it into a signal, and what can possibly inhibit these organs. The chapter ends off explaining how the hair cells transmit the data from the inner ear to the brain.

"Hearing Speech"
This section was particularly interesting because it is the reason I am reading the book. I was looking to understand the "Phonemic Restoration Effect" or more simply put, what the brain does when a syllable is missing in a spoken word in order to fill in the missing sound. The authors first develop the difference between words and sounds. This is an important distinction not only because they are processed in different parts of the brain but because they have to be differentiated in order for language to exist. They cleverly detail how naturally humans process language from even a young age stating, "Even the most monosyllabic of human teenagers readily appreciates that the meaning of the sentence `John eats and then flies' is very different from that of `And then John eats flies'". They go on to explain the ways the brain makes decisions about what is being spoken. While the complexity is overwhelming and they openly admit much is still unknown, they do a solid job explaining how complex the process of auditory communication is.

"Development, Learning, and Plasticity"
This chapter has been what the whole books seems to lead up to. Now that the reader knows the fundamentals of auditory processing, the authors apply all of that knowledge to how we develop it gradually starting in the womb. While we are not fully aware of why this occurs but after a year, human infants lose the ability to naturally speak certain phonemes that they have not learned. The authors then explain why this is not because of solely the motor cortex, but because the auditory cortex loses its trigger to be stimulated by certain phonemes. This theory was mentioned earlier in the book, but now seems more prevalent as well as tie everything together.

Auditory Protheses: From the Lab to the Clinic and Back Again
The technology in the field is rapidly growing and this chapter could very well already be out of date. They compare the differences between the old technology and what is available now to patients with various conditions. The authors spend a great deal of time detailing cochlear implants. They cover how impressive they are as well as their limitations. This chapter would be particularly useful to people considering getting an implant and would like to know just what it does and how it works.

I read this book with the intention of learning more about why the "Phonemic Restoration Effect" occurs. This book was the perfect background for the topic and while it didn't cover all of what I need, was definitely a worthwhile read to understand how the effect works. I think a background in neuroscience and/or physics is very helpful when reading this book, but not necessary. For readers about to take on reading this book, I would advise not getting caught up in the heavy math the authors are going to throw at you. The important concepts that you are supposed to extract from the math are detailed for you in simpler terms. Also, as you read I would suggest really thinking about how this applies in real life, because only then does the information stick. Hope anyone who reads this enjoys it as well.
Invissibale
This M.I.T. text is the best modern treatment I have yet come across. Our hearing and interpretation of auditory input is a complex one, to say the least. Yet here we have a patient, well-illustrated and lucid account backed up by excellent notes and references. I have found it a particularly useful source for my lectures at the Sydney Conservatorium.
Aedem
This is not just a good book about hearing, it is one of the best textbooks I have come across on any subject.
It goes far beyond the standard textbook treatment by introducing key recent advances wherever those affect the fundamentals of the story.
Quite a few fairly difficult ideas are involved, and the book's depth and compression could make it hard going for nonspecialist undergraduates. But it does repay effort.
Уou ll never walk alone
Very comprehensive and accesible overview of recent research. Ideal introduction to the subject.
Elildelm
This is an excellent resource for those of us who are constantly for more books on vocal pedagogy. A very sound and empirical text that you will want to add to your library.
Akirg
Good shipping time, item as described.
DrayLOVE
As a musician and a lay neurologist And autodidacticpolymath, I thought this book would deliver more than it did not much more to say. Read "Music, the Brain and Ecstasy" before tackling this academic material.
Had this book been available 15 years ago, when I first became interested in hearing and the auditory system, it would have saved me a lot of trouble. Many aspects of hearing are not intuitive, and ar often poorly explained in standard neuroscience texts on sensory perception. Here we have a highly accessible introduction to this fascinating topic. Virtually every aspect of hearing is covered in engaging and clear language, from basic acoustics to the perceptual and neural basis of musical pitch, sound localization, auditory scene analysis, the processing of vocalizations and speech. There is even a chapter on the emerging technology of cochlear implants for treating deafness. I also particularly like the way the authors have complemented the book with multimedia examples at the accompanying web site auditoryneuroscience.com. Really excellent!
Auditory Neuroscience: Making Sense of Sound (The MIT Press) ebook
Author:
Israel Nelken,Andrew J. King,Jan Schnupp
Category:
Medicine
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1835 kb
FB2 size:
1749 kb
DJVU size:
1666 kb
Language:
Publisher:
The MIT Press (August 17, 2012)
Pages:
366 pages
Rating:
4.7
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