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Disengagement from Southwest Africa: The prospects for peace in Angola and Namibia (The East-South relations series) ebook


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Congo Sudan Somalia South Africa Browse All Africa. Brazil Canada Cuba Mexico United States Venezuela Browse All Americas. Afghanistan China India Japan North Korea South Korea Browse All Asia. Disengagement From Southwest Africa: Prospects For Peace In Angola And Namibia. This book brings together papers presented at a December 1988 conference on the Angolan-Namibian negotiations that were then moving toward their conclusion.

This second volume in the East-South Relations series explores the implications of Gorbachev's new thinking for regional .

This second volume in the East-South Relations series explores the implications of Gorbachev's new thinking for regional conflicts. Because these conflicts jeopardize tranquil relations between the United States and the Soviet Union, they are perceived as contrary to the new spirit of global cooperation. Recommend to Librarian.

Disengagement from Southwest Africa book. This second volume in the East-South Relations series explores the implications of Gorbachev's new thinking for regional conflicts. Because these conflicts jeopardize tranquil relations between the United States and the Soviet U Gorbachev's new thinking on superpower relations assumes that struggle between two opposing world systems no longer characterizes the present era.

Sergio Diaz-Briquets, ed. Cuban Internationalism in Sub-Saharan Africa; and Owen E. Kahn, ed.

Prospects for Peace in Angola and Namibia (East-South Relations Series). Published January 1, 1991 by Transaction Publishers.

South Africa, Botswana and Namibia are suitably well placed to form a. .

Zimbabwe, Zambia, Malawi, DRC, Angola and Mozambique would be in their own group of badly mismanaged countries. Whereas South Africa and Angola (in spite of the oil) have considerable public debt (about 50% of GDP), with Namibia and Swaziland somewhat in between. Death Penalty: abolished in South Africa, Namibia and Angola, in effect in Lesotho and Botswana, de facto abolished in Swaziland To reconzile these legal, and underlying cultural, differences seems difficult.

The South African government responded by sending troops back into Angola, intervening in the war from 1981 to 1987, prompting the . Disengagement from Southwest Africa: The Prospects for Peace in Angola and Namibia. University of Miami Institute for Soviet and East.

The South African government responded by sending troops back into Angola, intervening in the war from 1981 to 1987, prompting the Soviet Union to deliver massive amounts of military aid from 1981 to 1986. In 1981, newly elected United States President Ronald Reagan's .

Angola–South Africa relations refer to the current and historical .

Angola–South Africa relations refer to the current and historical relationship between Angola and South Africa.

The Prospects for Growth and Structural Change in Southern Africa. Of all the regions on the continent, southern Africa holds out the best prospects for success - in trade, investment, political cooperation, and peace. Southern African Customs Union and BLS-Countries (Botswana, Lesotho and Swaziland). Conflict, internal and external, is finally ceasing to be a factor in regional integration, as Namibia, South Africa, and Malawi are now democratic, and Mozambique and Angola are moving in that direction. The key to regional success will be deeper. political cooperation.

The disengagement plan, hammered out by.However, there are tentative signs that his allies-Zimbabwe, Angola and Namibia-could reach the point where they squeeze him to submit to the pressure for peace and abandon his hopes of a military victory.

The disengagement plan, hammered out by the United Nations and a joint military commission drawn from the governments and factions involved, says that the belligerents should simultaneously start withdrawing their forces 40km (25 miles) from the front-line in the coming weeks. So far the UN mission in Congo is sounding cautiously optimistic, and its latest reports indicate that the ceasefire is holding. But there are still plenty of reasons to be sceptical.

Gorbachev's new thinking on superpower relations assumes that struggle between two opposing world systems no longer characterizes the present era. This second volume in the East-South Relations series explores the implications of Gorbachev's new thinking for regional conflicts. Because these conflicts jeopardize tranquil relations between the United States and the Soviet Union, they are perceived as contrary to the new spirit of global cooperation. This volume suggests that the accords on Southwest Africa may illustrate how the superpowers will resolve conflict, and shows how smaller powers may now have new roles cast for them by the superpowers.

In 1975, Soviet-Cuban assistance to the Leninist-oriented Movement for the Popular Liberation of Angola (MPLA) was the first extensive Soviet-allied military intervention in the Third World. While the Soviet-backed Cubans propped up the MPLA, the South Africans intervened, on a smaller scale, in support of the National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA) under Jonas Savimbi. After 1985 UNITA began receiving United States support, and a military stalemate ensued. The contributors to this volume analyse how the Soviet Union and the United States used this stalemate to move the MPLA, Cuba and South Africa to settle not only their differences, but also the vexing question of the Independence of Namibia.

Central issues explored are how and why South Africa and Cuba got into the Angolan arena, why they stayed so long, and why they saw fit to get out. While the authors differ on the forces at work, their debate is itself enlightening, and offers valuable insights into the policy options of regional powers. The contributors also review further steps, beyond military disengagement, needed to finally resolve the Angolan civil war, and ensure regional stability. They assess the potential for breakdown of the accords, and the likely consequences should this occur.

Disengagement from Southwest Africa will interest policymakers and researchers concerned with developments in southern Africa and Cuba, and with relations between the superpowers.

Disengagement from Southwest Africa: The prospects for peace in Angola and Namibia (The East-South relations series) ebook
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Transaction Publishers (1991)
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244 pages
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