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Philosophy of Mind (Dimensions of Philosophy) ebook

by Jaegwon Kim


He wrote in the Preface to this 1996 book, "This book is an introductory survey of philosophy of mind, with brief incursions into the overlapping and adjoining field of philosophy of psychology.

He wrote in the Preface to this 1996 book, "This book is an introductory survey of philosophy of mind, with brief incursions into the overlapping and adjoining field of philosophy of psychology.

Philosophy of Mind book. Jaegwon Kim's Philosophy of Mind is the classic, comprehensive survey of the subject. Now in its The philosophy of mind has always been a staple of the philosophy curriculum

Philosophy of Mind book. Now in its The philosophy of mind has always been a staple of the philosophy curriculum. But it has never held a more important place than it does today, with both traditional problems and new topics often sparked by the developments in the psychological, cognitive, and computer sciences.

Philosophy of mind is a branch of philosophy that studies the ontology and nature of the mind and its relationship with the body

Philosophy of mind is a branch of philosophy that studies the ontology and nature of the mind and its relationship with the body. The mind–body problem is a paradigm issue in philosophy of mind, although other issues are addressed, such as the hard problem of consciousness, and the nature of particular mental states

The philosophy of mind has always been a staple of the philosophy curriculum. Jaegwon Kim is William Perry Faunce Professor of Philosophy at Brown University.

The philosophy of mind has always been a staple of the philosophy curriculum. But it has never held a more important place than it does today, with both traditional problems and new topics often sparked by the implications of modern psychology, cognitive science, and computer science. In this concise but comprehensive survey, Jaegwon Kim explores, maps, and interprets this difficult terrain. He is the author of Supervenience and Mind (1993) and of many important papers on the philosophy of mind, metaphysics, epistemology, and the philosophy of science.

Questions about philosophy, . not one-liners or otherwise uninformative). Although I wouldn't start with it, as it might be a bit dense with no other background, but you might want to head there after the SEP article and Searle's intro.

Philosophy of Mind Jaegwon Kim BROWN UNIVERSITY Westview Press A Subsidiary of Perseus Books, . Dimensions of Philosophy Series All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America

Philosophy of Mind Jaegwon Kim BROWN UNIVERSITY Westview Press A Subsidiary of Perseus Books, . Printed in the United States of America. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.

Gracefully written and marked by philosophical elegance, it is a classic text by a major figure in the field. The philosophy of mind has always been a staple of the philosophy curriculum.

Where "philosophy of mind" talks about eg. dualism vs. behaviourism vs. .I would imagine that mainstream introductions to mainstream philosophy of mind. functionalism, "philosophy of cognitive science" talks about symbol systems vs. neural networks vs. dynamical systems. Here's the table of contents. Originally Answered: What are some good books introductory to Philosophy of Mind? I would imagine that mainstream introductions to mainstream philosophy of mind, called by that name, might cover largely the same ground. A next step could be Andy Clark's excellent Mindware: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Cognitive Science.

The philosophy of mind has long been part of the core philosophy curriculum, and this book is the . Throughout the text, author Jaegwon Kim allows readers to come to their own terms with the central problems of the mind

The philosophy of mind has long been part of the core philosophy curriculum, and this book is the classic, comprehensive survey of the subject. Throughout the text, author Jaegwon Kim allows readers to come to their own terms with the central problems of the mind. At the same time, Kim's emerging views are on display and serve to move the discussion forward. Comprehensive, clear, and fair, Philosophy of Mind is a model of philosophical exposition and a significant contribution to the field.

The philosophy of mind has always been a staple of the philosophy curriculum. But it has never held a more important place than it does today, with both traditional problems and new topics often sparked by the developments in the psychological, cognitive, and computer sciences. Jaegwon Kim's Philosophy of Mind is the classic, comprehensive survey of the subject. Now in its second edition, Kim explores, maps, and interprets this complex and exciting terrain. Designed as an introduction to the field for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students, Philosophy of Mind focuses on the mind/body problem and related issues, some touching on the status of psychology and cognitive science. The second edition features a new chapter on Cartesian substance dualism-a perspective that has been little discussed in the mainstream philosophy of mind and almost entirely ignored in most introductory books in philosophy of mind. In addition, all the chapters have been revised and updated to reflect the trends and developments of the last decade. Throughout the text, Kim allows readers to come to their own terms with the central problems of the mind. At the same time, the author's own emerging views are on display and serve to move the discussion forward. Comprehensive, clear, and fair, Philosophy of Mind is a model of philosophical exposition. It is a major contribution to the study and teaching of the philosophy of mind.
Granijurus
I have been teaching an advanced undergraduate course in the philosphy of mind for decades. When this book came out, I began using it as my main text. This remained my practice as the first edition gave way to the second. I was pleased to receive a copy of the third edition and continued to use it as my primary text. The changes Kim has made from edition to edition are REAL and represent positive changes - both in content and in currency.

Kim's book may be a bit daunting to an undergraduate who has not had considerable exposure to philosophy and the way professional philosophers write in journals. His accounts of the many positions, and their variants, that he takes up are technical but, for the most part, no more technical than is necessary to achieve the sort of clarity for which Kim has always striven.

Kim is a remarkable figure. My considered opinion is that he, more than any of the prominent philosophers who have delved into the ratsnest of interrelated puzzles one finds in the philosophy of mind, is interested, purely and simply, in truth. He does not have any doctrinal agendas that I can detect. If there is anything resembling an agenda in Kim's writings, it is a fascination with the problem of the causal efficacy of mental states. That is hardly surprising since that issue looms as perhaps the most persistent problem as older views give way to newer ones.

I sympathize with the reviewer who expressed surprise that the works of Colin McGinn, Paul and Patricia Churchland, Daniel Dennett and John Searle are not so much as mentioned in this text. This is true of earlier editions - but, in fairness the third edition does mention most of them and even discusses some of their better known claims. Discussions of Searle's "Chinese Room" argument and Dennett's eliminative view of qualia are even presented in some detail. Feeling that the work of McGinn and the Churchlands deserve more consideration than Kim gives them, I have included readings froms them in my courses to supplement Kim's presentation.

I do not agree with the reviewer who suggests that this introduction is lacking relative to connections between the philosophy of mind, machine intelligence and neuropsychology. As for artificial intelligence and machine functionalism, Kim's treatment is quite detailed and complete. It is true that he has little to say about the connections between the philosophy of mind and neuropsychology. Perhaps when someone manages to articulate something on a grand scale about that connection which is clear, plausible, and amounts to more than rationalized optimism and hand-waving, Kim will include it. Wittgenstein's warning that psychology provides experimental data against a background of conceptual confusion is never far from my mind. I do not deny that neuropsychology is a fascinating subject that is well worth pursuing. It can do much to enhance understanding along many fronts and, hopefully, help to better the human condition. It is also a subject about which there will continue to be much to learn and ponder. At present, whatever grand philosophical implications it may hold in store, if any, are not yet understood. Too often it seduces intelligent persons to produce premature, even outlandish, philosphical conclusions. In saying this, I would exempt the eliminative materialism of the Churchlands and others about which I have doubts, but which I do not consider outlandish.

It is indisputable that Kim's section on Turing Machines and their hypothesized connection to mentality is clear and admirably detailed. After a formally correct, yet reasonably reader friendly introduction to the topic of Turing machines, Kim goes so far as to challenge his reader to devise machines capable of performing arithmetic subtraction and multiplication! The subsequent discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of various forms of machine functionalism seems to me the fairest and most complete of which I am aware. The sections on machine intelligence and the Turing test are especially complete, thoughtful detailed and interesting.

My course in philosphy of mind is an advanced undergraduate offereing. I teach at a school whose admissions department is selective. Consequently, the students I teach are, by and large ready for the level of presentation that Kim presents. It is definitely not a book for an introductory class. By and large, my students have found Kim's book, in all of its editions, challenging and rewarding. I suppose Kim does leave out topics that it would be better to include. What I can say about this book is this: the subjects it does discuss are discussed clearly, fairly and exhaustively. Equally important, it does not bully the reader to hold any particular view. For me, it remains the best book of its type.
Steel_Blade
From what I heard, to expound on an introduction to the philosophy of mind is no easy task especially for the most erudite philosopher of the mind. With this well-known fact that I discovered from an experienced reader in Amazon, I was somewhat intimidated in choosing which books I should read. I was looking for a very clear and comprehensive writing on Philosophy of Mind, something which doesn't dump everything into this premature philosopher. Surprisingly, I was recommended to read this book but I decided to read other independent reviews which lauded this book for it's lucid writing. As I bought this book on Kindle (yes, the format is decent)and read through out the month, there wasn't a single moment when I was utterly perplexed and intimidated. Now, the Turing Machine section was a bit intimidating, but careful and patient reading was the key to understanding it.

Jaegwon Kim's accomplishments does not only lie in the scope of his introductory writings in the Philosophy of Mind, but lies in his attempts to present a lucid and comprehensive introduction of Philosophy of Mind. This is no easy feat from what I heard, and I am very glad that this is my very first introductory textbook to Philosophy of Mind. The way he presented the arguments with such clarity has made it easy for me to understand the arguments, including the flaws and problems with them. From reading this book, Jaegwon Kim's arguments against Identity Theory has challenged my presumption that materialism is the obvious answer to the problem in philosophy of mind. Presenting criticisms against Computational Functionalism as being fairly limited in responding to the existence of Qualia and Inverted Spectrum of Colors has made me realize that Functionalism is not as strong as I thought. My deep commitments to Physicalism (or Closure Causality) has been somewhat shakened by the arguments he made against it by showing that there is a difficulty in trying to fit mental causation into such views. Consequently, Jaegwon Kim's introduction to Philosophy of Mind is not merely a survey of philosophical positions, thus not a mere encyclopedia, but rather a critical yet balanced evaluation in many of these philosophical evaluations that helps cultivates the habit on the part of the reader to have second thoughts about accepting any philosophical position.

In this sense, I commend Jaegwon Kim for writing a very informative and insightful introductory that has sparked my interest in Philosophy of Mind. The irony is that Jaegwon Kim was taught by his mentor to not be intimidated by Metaphysics; well, on my part, Jaegwon Kim's book has taught me not to be intimidated by Philosophy of Mind. Because of that, I wholeheartedly give this book 5 stars.
Phallozs Dwarfs
Jaegwon Kim (born 1934) is a Korean American philosopher who works at Brown University; he has written other books such as Essays in the Metaphysics of Mind,Mind in a Physical World: An Essay on the Mind-Body Problem and Mental Causation,Physicalism, or Something Near Enough, etc.

He wrote in the Preface to this 1996 book, "This book is an introductory survey of philosophy of mind, with brief incursions into the overlapping and adjoining field of philosophy of psychology. It covers many of the central issues currently debated in the field in a way that is intended to be accessible to those without a formal background in philosophy. .. I hope, too, that those with some familiarity with the field will also find something of interest here... it seemed to me desirable to make each chapter as self-sufficient as possible so that it could be read as an independent essay on the issues under discussion... I have found it desirable, and sometimes even necessary, to tolerate some overlap and repetition of material from chapter to chapter..." (Pg. xi)

He covers all of the usual areas: Behaviorism; Identity Theory; and Functionalism, as well as including chapters on Mental Causation; Consciousness; Mental Content; and Reductive and Nonreductive Physicalism.

This book is fine as an "Introduction"; for persons wanting a more "in depth" treatment, Kim's other books (such as those listed above) go into his own ideas at length.
Philosophy of Mind (Dimensions of Philosophy) ebook
Author:
Jaegwon Kim
Category:
Humanities
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EPUB size:
1384 kb
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Publisher:
Westview Press; 2 edition (July 29, 2005)
Pages:
352 pages
Rating:
4.8
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