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Objectivity, Relativism, and Truth: Volume 1: Philosophical Papers ebook

by Richard Rorty


ORT contains approximately a dozen essays originally published by Rorty in the 1980s. His pragmatic view of philosophy posits that knowledge results from conversation and convention, rather than from the uncovering of ahistoric truth, in other words, knowledge is created not than discovered

Richard Rorty's collected papers, written during the 1980s and now published in two volumes, take up some of the issues which divide Anglo-Saxon analytic philosophers and contemporary French and German philosophers and offer something of a compromise - agreeing with the latter in their criticisms of traditional notions of truth and objectivity, but disagreeing with them over the political implications they. Draw from dropping traditional philosophical doctrines

The sense in which the natural sciences are exemplary for inquiry is explicated in terms of the moral virtues of scientific communities rather than in terms of a special scientific method. The volume concludes with reflections on the relation of social democratic politics to philosophy. Скачать (djvu, . 5 Mb) Читать.

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The sense in which the natural sciences are exemplary for inquiry is explicated in terms of the moral virtues of scientific communities rather than in terms of a special scientific method. Categories: Other Social Sciences\Philosophy.

Objectivity, Relativism, and Truth book. Start by marking Objectivity, Relativism, and Truth: Philosophical Papers (Philosophical Papers (Cambridge)) (Volume 1) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Objectivity, Relativism, and Truth: Philosophical Papers (Philosophical Papers (Cambridge)) (Volume 1). by. Richard M. Rorty.

Similari- ties between Rorty's pragmatism and Skinner's radical behaviorism are explored in each of these.

Richard Rorty's Objectivity, Relativism, and Truth: Philosophical Papers, Volume 1 is a collection of papers that explores the implications of philosophical pragmatism in several areas, including natural science, mind-body issues in philosophy, and perspectives on liberal democracy and social change. Similari- ties between Rorty's pragmatism and Skinner's radical behaviorism are explored in each of these three areas

Objectivity, Relativism, and Truth. Volume 1. Richard Rorty. Book summary views reflect the number of visits to the book and chapter landing pages

Objectivity, Relativism, and Truth. Online ISBN: 9781139173643. Richard Rorty's collected papers, written during the 1980s and now published in two volumes, take up some of the issues which divide Anglo-Saxon analytic philosophers and contemporary French and German philosophers and offer something of a compromise - agreeing with the latter in their criticisms of traditional notions of truth and objectivity, but disagreeing with them over the political implications they. draw from dropping traditional philosophical doctrines. Book summary views reflect the number of visits to the book and chapter landing pages.

The sense in which the natural sciences are exemplary for inq. Specifications. Philosophical Papers (Cambridge). Cambridge University Press.

These doubts are expressed in his second book, Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature (1979), which is one of the most widely discussed of all recent American works in philosophy.

In this volume Rorty offers a Deweyan account of objectivity as intersubjectivity, one that drops claims about universal validity and instead focuses on utility for the purposes of a community. The sense in which the natural sciences are exemplary for inquiry is explicated in terms of the moral virtues of scientific communities rather than in terms of a special scientific method. The volume concludes with reflections on the relation of social democratic politics to philosophy.
Shezokha
Tackles the critical philosophical issues of the 60s and 70s, with breathtaking clarity now and admiration for the lucid pioneering then.
Mavegelv
Best of Rorty
Elastic Skunk
Richard McKay Rorty (1931-2007) was an American philosopher, who taught at Princeton, the University of Virginia, Stanford University, etc. He wrote many other books such as Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature,Consequences Of Pragmatism: Essays 1972-1980,Contingency, Irony, and Solidarity,Essays on Heidegger and Others: Philosophical Papers, Volume 2, etc.

He wrote in the Introduction to this 1991 collection, “This is the first volume of a collection of papers written between 1980 and 1989. The papers in this volume take up, for the most part, issues and figures within analytic philosophy… The six papers that make up Part I of this volume offer an antirepresentationalist account of the relation between natural science and the rest of culture… I mean [an account] which does not view knowledge as a matter of getting reality right, but rather as a matter of acquiring habits of action for coping with reality.”

He states, “it is not clear why ‘relativist’ should be thought an appropriate term for the ethnocentric third view, the one which the pragmatist DOES hold. For the pragmatist is not holding a positive theory which says that something is relative to something else. He is, instead, making the purely NEGATIVE point that we should drop the traditional distinction between knowledge and opinion, construed as the distinction between truth as correspondence to reality and truth as a commendatory term for well-justified beliefs. The reason that the realist calls this negative claim ‘relativist’ is that he cannot believe that anybody would seriously deny that truth has an intrinsic nature… the pragmatist does not have a theory of truth, much less a relativistic one… his account of the value of cooperative human inquiry has only an ethical base, not an epistemological or metaphysical one.” (Pg. 23-24)

He explains, “What I am calling ‘pragmatism’ might also be called ‘left-wing Kuhnianism.’ It has been also been rather endearingly called … the ‘new fuzziness,’ because it is an attempt to blue just those distinctions between the objective and the subjective and between fact and value which the critical conception of rationality has developed. We fuzzies would like to substitute the idea of ‘unforced agreement’ for that of ‘objectivity.’” (Pg. 38)

He acknowledges, “From a Wittgensteinian or Davidsonian or Deweyan angle, there is no such thing as the ‘best explanation’ of anything; there is just the explanation which best suits the purpose of some given explainer.” (Pg. 60) Later, he says, “Pragmatism views knowledge not as a relation between mind and an object, but, roughly, as the ability to get agreement by using persuasion rather than force.” (Pg. 88)

He suggests, “I see [Donald] Davidson as the culmination of the holist and pragmatist strains in contemporary analytic philosophy.” (Pg. 117) He added, “like [William] James… Davidson is not giving us a new ‘theory of truth.’ Rather, he is giving us reasons for thinking that we can safely get along with less philosophizing about truth than we had thought we needed.” (Pg. 139) But later, he admits, “Though my own leanings are obviously toward radicalism, I have not attempted to adjudicate the issue between Davidson’s quick and dirty dissolution of the traditional problematic and Sellars’ attempt at a happy ‘via media.’ I have merely tried to get that issue into sharper focus.” (Pg. 161)

He summarizes, “In the form John Dewey gave it, pragmatism is a philosophy tailored to the needs of political liberalism, a way of making political liberalism look good to persons with philosophical tastes. It provides a rationale for nonideological, compromising, reformist muddling-through (what Dewey called ‘experimentalism’).” (Pg. 211)

This is an exceptionally-useful collection of Rorty’s papers, that will be “must reading” for anyone studying Rorty’s thought.
Hulbine
Published in 1990, `Objectivity, Relativism, and Truth' (ORT) is the first installment in the 4-volume Richard Rorty: Philosophical Papers collection published by Cambridge University Press. ORT contains approximately a dozen essays originally published by Rorty in the 1980s. His pragmatic view of philosophy posits that knowledge results from conversation and convention, rather than from the uncovering of ahistoric truth, in other words, knowledge is created not than discovered. For those unfamiliar with Rorty, he is one of the best known and most controversial American thinkers of the late twentieth century; an accomplished philosopher, essayist and cultural critic. I offer a few comments for potential readers.

While sharing a common pragmatic theme the essays are roughly divided between those that deal with questions of language and epistemology and those that are concerned with socio-political issues. While the essays are non-technical in nature they presuppose (especially the non-political ones) a familiarity with the Western intellectual tradition, its key thinkers and ideas. Indeed, much of the fun or frustration depending on your perspective, in reading Rorty is interacting with his highly creative and oft criticized interpretations of other thinkers. In regard to this latter point the consistent casting of Dewey throughout ORT as a proto-Rortian has motivated me to re-read Dewey, while his engagement with Davidson has rekindled my interest in a philosopher that I have tended to overlook.

Often characterized as a post-modern relativist Rorty is careful to distance himself from highly individualistic versions of relativism, preferring to define himself as a pragmatist, a pragmatist who sees knowledge creation as a group rather than an individual undertaking. While shifting the frame of reference for knowledge from the individual to the group seems intuitively correct, I am unsure such a move it can be justified Rortian presuppositions. That is, when pressed the notion of a `group' or a `community' is itself seems a rather slippery and arbitrary concept. What constitutes a legitimate social unit, a country, a culture, a self-designated group? There seems to be no compelling reason that a social unit could not be as small as two individuals; in such a case, the community in effect dissolves into individual.

In `The Priority of Democracy to Philosophy' Rorty is at his provocative best; interacting with opposing thinkers and challenging the notion that democratic institutions require philosophical underpinnings. While I share many of his values, I am skeptical about the potential fruits of the post-modern project. Only in a world formed by Judeao-Christian values and enlightenment principles is it possible to naively assume that current cultural attitudes will prevail once their foundations have been cast aside - is a free and democratic society possible in Rorty's disenchanted and pragmatic world. Selfishness, power and totalitarianism seem as likely to fill the void created by post-modern doubt as is Rorty's utopian "democratic, progressive, pluralist community".

With regard to shortcomings I offer two thoughts. First, the text's font is diminishingly small and can be difficult to read. It strikes me as odd why the publishers did not use a more reader-friendly font - the book would still have been of a modest size. Second, with regard to style, Rorty is sometimes accused of smugness and elitism - dismissing those that disagree with him and fanatical and unworthy of serious considerations, while his writing style at times can feel more rhetoric than substance - albeit beautiful rhetoric.

Overall, I highly recommend the small text. It may be particularly enjoyable/beneficial for graduate students who have been schooled in the analytic tradition. To fully appreciate ORT, however, it is important have a good grounding in the modern intellectual tradition (philosophy, literature, science).
Objectivity, Relativism, and Truth: Volume 1: Philosophical Papers ebook
Author:
Richard Rorty
Category:
Humanities
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Publisher:
Cambridge University Press (November 30, 1990)
Pages:
236 pages
Rating:
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