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Dummett: Philosophy of Language ebook

by Karen Green


This book sets out to rectify this situation. Karen Green offers the first comprehensive introduction to Dummett's philos.

In conjunction with them he has been responsible for much of the framework within which questions concerning meaning and understanding are raised and answered in the late twentieth-century Anglo-American tradition.

In conjunction with them he has been responsible for much of the framework within which questions concerning meaning and understanding are raised and answered in the late twentieth-century Anglo-American tradition.

Karen Green is an Australian philosopher and Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Melbourne. She is known for her works on women's intellectual history. Green is the president of the Australasian Association of Philosophy and a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities (elected in 2009). A History of Women’s Political Thought in Europe 1700–1800 (Cambridge University Press, 2014).

Periodic electrical activity in a unicellular green alga has been studied by the method of extracellular recording. Information is given on the influence of light and inhibitors of metabolism on the rhythmic activity. Observation of two parallel rhythms points to the existence of two internal oscillators the functioning of which leads to periodic brief change in the state of the cell membrane.

Michael Dummett stands out among his generation as the only Britishphilosopher of language to rival in stature the Americans, Davidsonand Quine. In conjunction with them he has been responsible formuch of the framework within which questions concerning meaning andunderstanding are raised and answered in the late twentieth-centuryAnglo-American tradition. Dummett's output has been prolific andhighly influential, but not always as accessible as it deserves tobe. This book sets out to rectify this situation.

Karen Green offers the first comprehensive introduction toDummett's philosophy of language, providing an overview and summaryof his most important arguments. She argues that Dummett should notbe understood as a determined advocate of anti-realism, but thathis greatest contribution to the philosophy of language is to haveset out the strengths and weaknesses of the three most influentialpositions within contemporary theory of meaning - realism, asepitomised by Frege, the holism to be found in Wittgenstein, Quineand Davidson and the constructivism which can be extracted fromBrouwer. It demonstrates that analytic philosophy as Dummettpractices it, is by no means an outmoded approach to thinking aboutlanguage, but that it is relevant both to cognitive science and tophenomenology.

Kikora
Karen Green's entry in the "Key Contemporary Thinkers" series compares very favorably with Bernhard Weiss' volume in Princeton's "Philosophy Now." I've already contrasted their very different styles in my Amazon review of Weiss' book (q.v.), so I will limit myself here to restating my gratitude for Ms. Green's constant willingness to juxtapose Dummett's views with those of other philosophers. I for one find it very helpful, when trying to form an initial impression of a thinker with whom I am unfamiliar, to see his or her work against the backdrop of that of others with whom I am already acquainted. Part of the pleasure I take in reading philosophy is seeing just how, in staking her own particular ground, a thinker in effect extends the available terrain with a previously unimagined combination of stances re specific philosophical questions. None of these positions need itself be original for their assemblage to appear unique and to thus expand thought's range of possibilities (at least as long as there is some adequate threshold of cohesiveness among them). If there is one thing I still find wanting in both Green's and Weiss' expositions is sufficient specification of exactly what a theory of meaning (or a meaning-theory, to hew to Dummett's terminology) will actually consist in. For my taste, this topic is addressed at a frustratingly general and abstract level. (Somehow I suspect that Dummett's own writings will offer me little relief on this account, although I am willing to take the risk and be proven wrong.)
Roru
I agree that this is much more readable and sophisticated than much of the "Philosophy Now" series. I also agree that what sets it apart is the attention to context, history, and deeper philosophical motivations. Particularly helpful are the links drawn between Dummett's philosophies of language, of math, and of mind. Also, Green's pedagogical style is crisp and refreshing: she notes possible objections or inconsistencies in passing, so as to show the issues at stake and stimulate our own imaginations, rather than simply laying out a series of alternative positions. An example for other professors to follow!

Since this book is about academic philosophy, I can't imagine it appealing to anyone other than philosophy students. But I would recommend it highly to any undergraduate studying the philosophy of language, who has read a little Frege, Wittgenstein, Quine, and Davidson. If I had read it earlier, it would have saved me some frustration. I feel that it enriched my understanding not only of Dummett but of the whole core of the analytic curriculum.
Dummett: Philosophy of Language ebook
Author:
Karen Green
Category:
Humanities
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1102 kb
FB2 size:
1761 kb
DJVU size:
1329 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Polity; First Edition edition (October 8, 2001)
Pages:
248 pages
Rating:
4.2
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