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Queen Salome: Jerusalem's Warrior Monarch of the First Century B.C.E. ebook

by Kenneth Atkinson


Queen Salome: Jerusalem's Warrior Monarch of the First Century . Электрондук китептин автору: Kenneth Atkinson. Бул китепти Google Play Китептер колдонмосу менен компьютерде, android жана iOS түзмөктөрүндө окуңуз.

Queen Salome: Jerusalem's Warrior Monarch of the First Century . Queen Salome: Jerusalem's Warrior Monarch of the First Century . китебин оффлайн режиминде окуу үчүн жүктөп алыңыз да, кызыктуу жерлерин белгилеп, кыстармаларды сактап, эскертмелерди жазыңыз.

2012 As the ruler of Judea from 76 to 67 .

Queen Salome Jerusalem’s Warrior Monarch of the First Century . Queen Salome Alexandra (ca. 141 . appointed the kingdom’s high priest, led its men in battle, subjugated neighboring kings, and stopped the religious violence that plagued her society. The author of several books, he is recognized internationally for his work on the Dead Sea Scrolls, ancient history, and religion – –

Queen Salome: Jerusalem's. has been added to your Cart. In the field of history, few books are necessary.

Queen Salome: Jerusalem's. The life and impact of the shockingly overlooked historic figure of Judean Queen Shlomzion (Salome) Alexandra has been missing from the world of biography of the historic greats. Dr. Atkinson - an historian and Dead Sea Scrolls scholar - fills this gap in with considerable expertise and analysis. Salome Alexandra's name mostly survives today only in a street in modern Jerusalem, but the author captures her important ancient legacy well.

As the ruler of Judea from 76 to 67 . Using the Dead Sea Scrolls and related texts, Atkinson reconstructs Queen Salome's life and times in the first biography of the sole legitimate female monarch of ancient Judea. Sep 29, 2015 Kim Stokely rated it it was ok. I wanted to know more about Queen Salome, but much of this book was about her ancestors and contemporary monarchs. The information was presented well, not a dry textbook.

Queen Salome is an interesting but long-overlooked figure in ancient history. Citation: Karl C. Randall. Kenneth Atkinson has finally redressed this oversight in his work Queen Salome. Atkinson has taken great pains to gather every source of information on Salome Alexandra, making it the only comprehensive work about her life. The author's evaluation and collation of sources relating the same event are both careful and clear.

University of Northern Iowa. As the ruler of Judea from 76 to 67 . This volume recreates Queen Salome’s fascinating life and the time in which she lived-an age when women ruled the Middle East. appointed the kingdom's high priest, led its men in battle, subjugated neighboring kings, and stopped the religious violence that plagued her society. Presiding over Judea's greatest period of peace and prosperity, she shaped the Judaism of Jesus' day as well as our own. Virtually unknown today, Queen Salome remained so unique that historians have largely ignored her rather than try to explain the perplexing circumstances that brought her to power.

Faculty Book Gallery. Recommended Citation. Atkinson, Kenneth, "Queen Salome: Jerusalem's Warrior Monarch of the First Century . Faculty Book Gallery.

Atkinson, Kenneth (2012). Queen Salome: Jerusalem’s Warrior Monarch of the First Century . p. 1. ISBN 978-0-7864-7002-0. That Alexandra, the widow of Aristobulus I, was identical with the one who married his brother Alexander Jannaeus is nowhere explicitly stated by Josephus, who, it is generally inferred, took it for granted that the latter performed the levirate marriage prescribed by the law for the widow of a childless brother deceased. Hezser, C. Rabbinic law in its Roman and Near Eastern context.

Queen Salome : Jerusalem's Warrior Monarch of the First Century B. C. E. by Kenneth Atkinson.

As the ruler of Judea from 76 to 67 B.C.E., Queen Salome Alexandra (ca. 141 b.c.e.-67 b.c.e.) appointed the kingdom's high priest, led its men in battle, subjugated neighboring kings, and stopped the religious violence that plagued her society. Presiding over Judea's greatest period of peace and prosperity, she shaped the Judaism of Jesus' day as well as our own. Virtually unknown today, Queen Salome remained so unique that historians have largely ignored her rather than try to explain the perplexing circumstances that brought her to power. This volume recreates Queen Salome's fascinating life and the time in which she lived--an age when women ruled the Middle East.
Conjukus
In the field of history, few books are necessary. This is one of them. The life and impact of the shockingly overlooked historic figure of Judean Queen Shlomzion (Salome) Alexandra has been missing from the world of biography of the historic greats. Dr. Atkinson - an historian and Dead Sea Scrolls scholar -- fills this gap in with considerable expertise and analysis.

Salome Alexandra's name mostly survives today only in a street in modern Jerusalem, but the author captures her important ancient legacy well. (In some places, he underplays, misinterprets, overplays or overlooks some aspects, but for the most part her place in history is well-covered and analyzed by a clearly enthusiastic expert. ) Further, he gives a good presentation of the role of women in her time and place, and resurrects the powerful character of the women of her family - the Hasmoneans or Maccabees, who gave us Hannukah and perhaps saved Judaism itself.

Shlomzion directly (and her family) did much to shape history, especially Jewish and Christian, and perhaps Roman as well. (It is sad that compendia of great Jewish women, done in this feminist age, leave her as barely more than a footnote though she might have been more influential than most or all Jewish women in history.) She probably established for the first time universal Jewish education as a religious obligation, defined the atmosphere of Jewish sectarianism in the time of Jesus, may have (his case is weaker but circumstantially strong) turned the tide against Armenia becoming the leading empire to beat in ancient times, held one of history's earliest known war-crimes trials (the author does not go into this, sadly), saved rabbinic Judaism, and restored ancient Israel to prosperity after prolonged civil and foreign war, a fact celebrated in the Talmud and even by her leading ancient critic, Josephus.

Queen Shlomzion's direct progeny may have affected the outcome of Rome's civil wars. Lesser and less proud accomplishments may be her aiding the rise of the Herods as Judean kingmakers and later kings in the region, her empowering of a brutal persecuting execution, and her possible enabling of her ruthless husband to divide Jews into armed sects.

The downside of the book, other than perhaps some questionable assertions and conclusions - such as suggesting that the common name Salome in ancient times was usually given as a conscious tribute to Shlomzion (Salome) Alexandra, or over-attributing to anti-female bias her relative absence from attention in contemporary and subsequent history (which is indeed a good deal of the reason but perhaps not as simple or complete as Dr. Atkinson asserts), or his overdoing of the "warrior-queen" theme -- is that the book is too "topical" in the organization of its presentation. It appears to be an amalgamation and popularization of several worthy academic papers, but with the weaknesses of that makeup: lots of repetition, more than a few minor editing glitches, several variations in tone, a few unnecessary digressions, some overlooked interesting details, and the overarching loss of focus a popular reader might get from lack of grand narrative.

Still, if any of the following are of interest to you - Jewish history, Christian history, Roman history, Middle East history, religious history, ancient military, social, and women's history -- Dr. Atkinson's book (and additional material about its subject) should be read. Even more, if you are interested in such areas, a book about Queen Shlomzion (Salome) and her times needs to be on your list, not only of things to read, but things enthusiasts and scholars of history should write much more about.
Fordrekelv
I'd hoped the book would contain more information about the life of Queen Salome. The first half of the book was devoted to her ancestors. While interesting, they're not who I wanted to learn about. The author repeats himself several times as well.
FreandlyMan
An embarrassment.
Queen Salome: Jerusalem's Warrior Monarch of the First Century B.C.E. ebook
Author:
Kenneth Atkinson
Category:
Humanities
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1712 kb
FB2 size:
1221 kb
DJVU size:
1825 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Mcfarland (April 30, 2012)
Pages:
296 pages
Rating:
4.4
Other formats:
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