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The Music Has Gone Out of the Movement: Civil Rights and the Johnson Administration, 1965-1968 ebook

by David C. Carter


After the passage of sweeping civil rights and voting rights legislation in 1964 and 1965, the civil rights movement stood .

After the passage of sweeping civil rights and voting rights legislation in 1964 and 1965, the civil rights movement stood poised to build on considerable momentum. Carter reveals the complex and often tense relationships between the Johnson administration and activist groups advocating further social change, and he extends the traditional timeline of the civil rights movement beyond the passage of the Voting Rights Ac. .

Home Browse Books Book details, The Music Has Gone out of the . On March 15, 1965, Lyndon Baines Johnson addressed a Joint Session of Congress to call for federally enforced voting rights legislation.

Home Browse Books Book details, The Music Has Gone out of the Movement: Civil. The Music Has Gone out of the Movement: Civil Rights and the Johnson Administration, 1965-1968. After the passage of sweeping civil rights and voting rights legislation in 1964 and 1965, the civil rights movement stood poised to build on considerable momentum.

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David Carter has taken a new look at the period between 1965 and 1968 and the relationship between the Johnson administration and the African-American Civil Rights movement of the mid-20th century.

David Carter has taken a new look at the period between 1965 and 1968 and the relationship between the Johnson administration and the African-American Civil Rights movement of the mid-20th century. He paints a portrait of a movement in transition and a president so embroiled in the Vietnam War that his beloved poverty program was gutted in the process. The lines are clearly drawn between the financial failure to fund those programs and the rioting that killed many people over the last half of the 1960s. His writing is thoughtful and intelligent.

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Music Has Gone Out of the Movement: Civil Rights and the Johnson Administration, 1965-1968 After the passage of sweeping civil rights and voting rights legislation in 1964 and 1965, the civil rights movement stood poised to build on considerable momentum. Examining grassroots movements and organizations and their complicated relationships with the federal government and state authorities between 1965 and 1968, David C. Carter takes readers through the inner workings of local civil rights coalitions as they tried to maintain strength within their organizations while facing both overt and subtle opposition from state and federal officials.

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Movement : Civil Rights and the Johnson Administration, 1965-1968 .

The Music Has Gone Out of the Movement : Civil Rights and the Johnson Administration, 1965-1968. In a famous speech at Howard University in 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson declared that victory in the next battle for civil rights would be measured in "equal results" rather than equal rights and opportunities.

The Music Has Gone Out of the Movement: Civil Rights and the Johnson Administration, 1965-1968. University of North Carolina Press. p. 240. ISBN 9781469606576. Retrieved 2016-01-06. a b "Wharlest Jackson Case The Civil Rights Cold Case Project". Retrieved 2019-05-27.

After the passage of sweeping civil rights and voting rights legislation in 1964 and 1965, the civil rights movement stood poised to build on considerable momentum. In a famous speech at Howard University in 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson declared that victory in the next battle for civil rights would be measured in "equal results" rather than equal rights and opportunities. It seemed that for a brief moment the White House and champions of racial equality shared the same objectives and priorities. Finding common ground proved elusive, however, in a climate of growing social and political unrest marked by urban riots, the Vietnam War, and resurgent conservatism. Examining grassroots movements and organizations and their complicated relationships with the federal government and state authorities between 1965 and 1968, David C. Carter takes readers through the inner workings of local civil rights coalitions as they tried to maintain strength within their organizations while facing both overt and subtle opposition from state and federal officials. He also highlights internal debates and divisions within the White House and the executive branch, demonstrating that the federal government's relationship to the movement and its major goals was never as clear-cut as the president's progressive rhetoric suggested.Carter reveals the complex and often tense relationships between the Johnson administration and activist groups advocating further social change, and he extends the traditional timeline of the civil rights movement beyond the passage of the Voting Rights Act.
Iraraeal
An important eye opening look at one of the most significant eras of the twentieth century. This book is heavily researched and easy to read. I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to know about what happened to the civil rights movement.
Zaryagan
David Carter has taken a new look at the period between 1965 and 1968 and the relationship between the Johnson administration and the African-American Civil Rights movement of the mid-20th century. He paints a portrait of a movement in transition and a president so embroiled in the Vietnam War that his beloved poverty program was gutted in the process. The lines are clearly drawn between the financial failure to fund those programs and the rioting that killed many people over the last half of the 1960s. His writing is thoughtful and intelligent. The research is clearly exhaustive and without compromising the truth of the time he is writing about, he still manages to bring a very enlightened, current perspective of his own, tipping his hat to other civil rights movements and to gender concerns often neglected in the writings about this time. I enjoyed the book immensely and recommend it highly to those interested in this period, movement building or the Civil Rights movement of that time. Excellent book.
The Music Has Gone Out of the Movement: Civil Rights and the Johnson Administration, 1965-1968 ebook
Author:
David C. Carter
Category:
Humanities
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1325 kb
FB2 size:
1212 kb
DJVU size:
1192 kb
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Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press; 1St Edition edition (August 1, 2009)
Pages:
384 pages
Rating:
4.8
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