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The Origins of FBI Counterintelligence ebook

by Raymond J. Batvinis


Former FBI agent Raymond Batvinis now tells how the Bureau grew from a small law enforcement unit into America's first organized counterespionage and counterintelligence service.

Former FBI agent Raymond Batvinis now tells how the Bureau grew from a small law enforcement unit into America's first organized counterespionage and counterintelligence service. Batvinis examines the FBI's emerging new roles during the two decades leading up to America's entry into World War II to show how it cooperated and competed with other federal agencies.

In his book,The Origins of FBI Counterintelligence, Raymond J. Batvinis provides a history of the . government's recognition in the late 1930s that a specific, professional, and coordinated response to clandestine foreign-government activities was necessary. government's recognition in the late 1930s that a specific, professional, and coordinated response to clandestine foreign-government activities was necessary

Origins of FBI Counterintelligence. On January 29, 1938, Colonel Raymond E. Lee, the . embassy’s military attache in London, was briefed on the matter and given a paraphrased copy of Crown’s letter.

Origins of FBI Counterintelligence. Wasting no time, Lee cabled the War Department, which quickly determined that Colonel H. W. T. Eglin, the base commander, was in no danger and had received no such instructions. Next the War Department requested FBI assistance to observe activities around the McAlpin Hotel, looking for the mysterious Crown and awaiting his telephone call to the colonel.

Inside the FBI’s Counterintelligence Program. While the Counterintelligence Division continues to neutralize national security threats from foreign intelligence services, its modern-day mission is much broader

Inside the FBI’s Counterintelligence Program. The FBI has been responsible for identifying and neutralizing ongoing national security threats from foreign intelligence services since 1917, nine years after the Bureau was created in 1908. While the Counterintelligence Division continues to neutralize national security threats from foreign intelligence services, its modern-day mission is much broader. The FBI is the lead agency for exposing, preventing, and investigating intelligence activities on . soil, and the Counterintelligence Division uses its full suite of investigative and intelligence capabilities to combat counterintelligence threats.

Raymond Batvinis talked about his book, The Origins of FBI Counterintelligence, published by University .

Raymond Batvinis talked about his book, The Origins of FBI Counterintelligence, published by University Press of Kansas.

The Origins of FBI Counterintelligence, examines the turbulent early years of the Bureau's counterintelligence evolution and includes examples of past Russian interference. His latest book provides details about former Director J. Edgar Hoover and FBI Counterespionage during World War II.

Batvinis discussed his new book, "The Origins of FBI Counterintelligence," in a program . Raymond Batvinis was a special agent of the FBI from 1972 to 1997 and also served in the FBI Intelligence Division Training Unit.

Raymond Batvinis was a special agent of the FBI from 1972 to 1997 and also served in the FBI Intelligence Division Training Unit. 53 minutes, 29 seconds.

Books Batvinis, Raymond. A critical view of the FBI crime statistics used to justify COINTELPRO. Explains why wiretapping was not necessary and shows the statically errors and misconceptions due to false statistics. The Origins of FBI Counterintelligence. Lawrence: University of Kansas, 2007. Analytical source focusing on a FBI agent’s view of the COINTELPRO program from an insider’s view. He focuses on the public outcry that followed and hints at its relationship to present day issues such as terrorism and 9/11 specifically.

Download book The origins of FBI counterintelligence, Raymond J. Batvinis.

1273009 22. Personal Name: Batvinis, Raymond J. Publication, Distribution, et. Lawrence. University Press of Kansas, (c)2007. Physical Description: xii, 332 p. : il. ports. Download book The origins of FBI counterintelligence, Raymond J.

Retired FBI Supervisory Special Agent. Author of the books, "The Origins of FBI and "Hoover's Secret War Against Axis Spies.

As the world prepared for war in the 1930s, the United States discovered that it faced the real threat of foreign spies stealing military and industrial secrets-and that it had no established means to combat them. Into that breach stepped J. Edgar Hoover and the FBI.Although the FBI's expanded role in World War II has been well documented, few have examined the crucial period before Pearl Harbor when the Bureau's powers secretly expanded to face the developing international emergency. Former FBI agent Raymond Batvinis now tells how the Bureau grew from a small law enforcement unit into America's first organized counterespionage and counterintelligence service. Batvinis examines the FBI's emerging new roles during the two decades leading up to America's entry into World War II to show how it cooperated and competed with other federal agencies. He takes readers behind the scenes, as the State Department and Hoover fought fiercely over the control of counterintelligence, and tells how the agency combined its crime-fighting expertise with its new wiretapping authority to spy on foreign agents.Based on newly declassified documents and interviews with former agents, Batvinis's account reconstructs and greatly expands our understanding of the FBI's achievements and failures during this period. Among these were the Bureau's mishandling of the 1938 Rumrich/Griebl spy case, which Hoover slyly used to broaden his agency's powers; its cracking of the Duquesne Espionage Case in 1941, which enabled Hoover to boost public and congressional support to new heights; and its failure to understand the value of Soviet agent Walter Krivitsky, which slowed Bureau efforts to combat Soviet espionage in America.In addition, Batvinis offers a new view of the relationship between the FBI and the military, cites the crucial contributions of British intelligence to the FBI's counterintelligence education, and reveals the agency's ultra-secret role in mining financial records for the Treasury Department. He also reviews the early days of the top-secret Special Intelligence Service, which quietly dispatched FBI agents posing as businessmen to South America to spy on their governments.With an insider's knowledge and a storyteller's skill, Batvinis provides a page-turning history narrative that greatly revises our views of the FBI—and also resonates powerfully with our own post-9/11 world.
iSlate
In Witness, Whitaker Chambers described the "conspiratorial methods" to avoid detection that were utilized by the Communist underground in the U.S. He later determined that these techniques "were almost wholly unnecessary." It was the 1930s and the U.S. government did not have an internal counterintelligence service. It was a time when tax dollars were being spent to create federal agencies that could respond to the Great Depression. Law enforcement was focused on a crime spree spurred by economic hardships. The Department of State, which was responsible for counterintelligence, was more concerned with passport fraud than espionage. The neglect of this critical government responsibility had severe consequences, as the Venona decryptions have proven.

In his book,The Origins of FBI Counterintelligence, Raymond J. Batvinis provides a history of the U.S. government's recognition in the late 1930s that a specific, professional, and coordinated response to clandestine foreign-government activities was necessary. As Batvinis explains, his book "traces the factors that led to the sudden awareness of the intelligence threat facing the nation, the reaction to that threat and the steps taken to confront it." To provide context, he bookends his narrative with two Nazi espionage cases that significantly impacted the decisions of this era. Batvinis details the mistakes and failures of the early counterintelligence effort, the tensions and rivalries between the government bureaucracies, and the innovations and accomplishments of the resulting institutional structures, such as the Interdepartmental Intelligence Conference, the Special Intelligence Service, and the Plant Survey Program.

His story concerns historical change. It concerns a shift to a modern mindset and approach to national security. And although his book lacks a clearly articulated central thesis, Batvinis furnishes evidence to support the argument that the formation of the U.S. Intelligence Community began prior to World War II as a result of the awareness and foresight of President Roosevelt, J. Edgar Hoover, Henry Morgenthau and others. This repositions the creation of the national security establishment from being a response to the Cold War.

The Origins of FBI Counterintelligence is a thoroughly researched and authoritative recounting of its topic. The important issues are discussed with objectivity and critical analysis. It fills in a gap normally found in other histories of the FBI and humanizes, through personal accounts, the work of the FBI. It is highly recommended as an introduction to the roots of today's U.S. Intelligence Community.
in waiting
The Marylanders: Without Shelter or a Crumb I strongly recommend this book. Dr. Batvinis has thoroughly researched the topic of our government's efforts prior to World War Two to create a system to counteract Axis and Soviet espionage. His historical research and conclusions are very relevant to the current issues we now face in our post 9/11 world. The issue of Constitutional law versus our need for national security is explored through the author's thorough examination of the decision making process between government appointed and elected officials.
Quendant
Product was as described and arrived on time. Looks great!!
Llathidan
Excellent transaction and book.
Jorius
This book is a fast, easy read with lots of details and facts about the early history of FBI. It is a must read for students of the pre-WW II era. Batvinis has done some supurb primary reasearch, even gong back to FDR's personal files to see what he said about the threats against our country. I just retired from the FBI after 30 years and I didn't know half the stuff in this book.
Goodman
This is a fine volume that offers a timely appraisal of how one of the nation's oldest and most revered law enforcement organizations restructured itself to execute the counterintelligence mission that became so critical as the world careened toward war in the 1930s. In the process Herbert Hoover took the opportunity to greatly expand the scope and power of the FBI to undertake surveillance across a much broader front than ever before. The author, Raymond J. Batvinis, does much to show how the FBI transformed itself, played politics, and became a publicly revered entity through its emphasis on counterintelligence.

Raymond Batvinis also does a fine job of exploring the bureaucratic battles within the government--especially between the FBI and the State Department--over who performed the mission and how it would be executed. The combination of the FBI's criminal investigation skills coupled with new techniques and objectives--for example wiretapping and domestic surveillance--presages some the debates and abuses of the post-9/11 era. In this regard "The Origins of FBI Counter-Intelligence" is highly instructive.

While an excellent book in overall, I was taken by the lack of depth in discussing the beginnings of the dispute between J. Edgar Hoover and General William Donovan of the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), the forerunner of the CIA, over jurisdictional issues involving counterintelligence from the onset of World War II. This is why I gave it a four instead of a five star review. Nonetheless, this is a very fine study of an important topic.
Irostamore
This book is a wealth of declassified information on the pre-WWII FBI and their efforts to keep America safe from Axis spies bent on causing chaos on the homefront. As a retired Special Agent in counterintelligence Batvinis' knowledge and a storyteller's skill, provides a rich historical narrative that has some eye-opening information. An interesting part of the narrative is how Hoover fought fiercely over the control of counterintelligence, and tells how the agency combined its crime-fighting expertise with its new wiretapping authority to spy on foreign agents. People opposed to the FBI's current war on terror should read this book and imagine what if the FBI was not as proactive. Where would we be today?
The Origins of FBI Counterintelligence ebook
Author:
Raymond J. Batvinis
Category:
Humanities
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1114 kb
FB2 size:
1405 kb
DJVU size:
1571 kb
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Publisher:
University Press of Kansas; Annotated edition edition (March 2, 2007)
Pages:
344 pages
Rating:
4.4
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