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Where Did the Party Go?: William Jennings Bryan, Hubert Humphrey, and the Jeffersonian Legacy ebook

by Jeff Taylor


Jeff Taylor's book is an excellent history of the Democratic party, exploring its history through the ideologies of Jefferson, William Jennings Bryan and Hubert Humpherey.

Jeff Taylor's book is an excellent history of the Democratic party, exploring its history through the ideologies of Jefferson, William Jennings Bryan and Hubert Humpherey. Taylor views Bryan as the last of the populist, middle America Democrats, the type of isolationist, anti-Supreme Court, pro-direct democracy and pro-small government Democrat that is very rare in today's world.

Start by marking Where Did the Party Go? . William Jennings Bryan’s principle cause of bimetallism is (of course) immortalized in his fiery Cross of Gold speech on the soapbox circuit.

Start by marking Where Did the Party Go?: William Jennings Bryan, Hubert Humphrey, and the Jeffersonian Legacy as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. In this intriguing book, Jeff Taylor looks beyond the shortcomings of individual candidates to focus on the pa It doesn’t take a pundit to recognize that the Democratic Party has changed.

William Jennings Bryan, Hubert Humphrey, and the Jeffersonian Legacy. It doesn t take a pundit to recognize that the Democratic Party has changed.

William Jennings Bryan, Hubert Humphrey, and the Jeffersonian Legacy, Jeff Taylor, University of Missouri Press, 2006. a b Insurgency campaigns and the quest for popular democracy: Theodore Roosevelt, Eugene McCarthy, and party monopolies.

Taylor's book, rich in detail, forensically forceful, is no routine exercise in comparative politics. Where Did the Party Go? amounts to a populist reinterpretation of the 20th-century Democratic Party

Taylor's book, rich in detail, forensically forceful, is no routine exercise in comparative politics. Where Did the Party Go? amounts to a populist reinterpretation of the 20th-century Democratic Party The possibility that these might represent the end, and not the ends, of American life never bubbled up into the effervescent oratory of Hubert Humphrey. But it would have been gospel to William Jennings Bryan. Taylor has devised a 12-tenet definition of the protean term "Jeffersonianism," which is really more a tendency than an ideology and savors of a decentralist, libertarian populism.

^ Jeff Taylor, Where Did the Party Go?: William Jennings Bryan, Hubert Humphrey, and the Jeffersonian Legacy (2006). Michael Kazin, et al. eds. The Concise Princeton Encyclopedia of American Political History (2011) p 149. ^ James J. Horn, Jan Ellen Lewis and Peter S. Onuf, eds. The Revolution of 1800: Democracy, Race, and the New Republic (2002). Noble E. Cunningham Jr. The Jeffersonian Republicans in Power: Party Operations, 1801-1809 (1963). See Andrew W. Robertson, "Afterword: Reconceptualizing Jeffersonian Democracy," Journal of the Early Republic (2013) 33 pp 317-334. Published by University of Missouri Press in Columbia, MO. Subjects. Internet Archive Wishlist, Democratic Party (.

Jeff Taylor is associate professor of political studies at Dordt College and author of Where Did the Party Go?: William Jennings Bryan, Hubert Humphrey, and the Jeffersonian Legacy. Thomas Aquinas Was No Citizen of the World. The theologian understood there must be a localism to our loves, lest they deteriorate into abstract sentiment. Casey ChalkDecember 16, 2019.

William Jennings Bryan, Hubert Humphrey, and the Jeffersonian Legacy: Where Did the Party Go?: William Jennings Bryan, Hubert Humphrey, and the Jeffersonian Legacy: ISBN 9780826216595 (978-0-8262-1659-5) Hardcover, University of Missouri, 2006. Founded in 1997, BookFinder.

Where Did the Party Go?: William Jennings Bryan, Hubert Humphrey, and the Jeffersonian Legacy (University of Missouri Press .

Where Did the Party Go?: William Jennings Bryan, Hubert Humphrey, and the Jeffersonian Legacy (University of Missouri Press, 2006). Reactionary Radicals, Radical Reactionaries. Chronicles: A Magazine of American Culture, October 2006. Invitation to regional conference tendered by Intercollegiate Studies Institute (2007). Inclusion in Marquis Who’s Who in America (56th, 57th, 58th, 60th, & 64th ed.

It doesn’t take a pundit to recognize that the Democratic Party has changed. With frustrating losses in the national elections of 2000 and 2004 and the erosion of its traditional base, the party of Jefferson and Jackson has become something neither would recognize.In this intriguing book, Jeff Taylor looks beyond the shortcomings of individual candidates to focus on the party’s real problem: its philosophical underpinnings have changed in ways that turn off many Americans. Rank-and-file party members may still hold to traditional views, but Taylor argues that those who finance, manage, and represent the party at the national level have become nothing less than Hamiltonian elitists—a stance that flies in the face of the party’s bedrock Jeffersonian principles.Where Did the Party Go? is a prodigious work of scholarship that converts extensive research into an accessible book. Taylor offers up a unique twelve-point model of Jefferson’s thought—as relevant to our time as to his—and uses it to appraise competing views of liberalism in the party during two key eras. Bypassing the well-worn assessments of high-profile Democratic presidents, he shows instead how liberalism from 1885 to 1925 was distinctly Jeffersonian as exemplified by the populism of William Jennings Bryan, while from 1938 to 1978 it became largely elitist under national leaders such as Hubert Humphrey who embraced a centralized state and economy, as well as imperial intervention abroad.In the first book to look closely at the ideologies of these two midwestern liberals, Taylor chronicles Bryan’s battles with the conservative wing of the party—putting today’s conflicts in sharp historical perspective—and then tells how Humphrey followed those who rejected Jeffersonian principles. By demonstrating how Jefferson’s legacy has gradually weakened, Taylor clearly shows why the party has lost its place in Middle America and how its transformation has led to widespread confusion. His provocative look at the post-Humphrey era considers why so many of today’s voters on both the Left and the Right agree on issues such as economic policy, foreign relations, and political reform—united against elitists of the Center while rarely recognizing their common kinship in Jeffersonian ideals.If party leaders have wondered where their traditional supporters have gone, they might well consider that those very voters have asked what became of the party they once knew. Taylor’s book forces many to question where the party of Jefferson has gone . . . and whether it can ever come back.
Amarin
This book is very knowlageable in the comparison between Bryan and Humphrey. This book makes you think. I don't agree with everything in the book but as Dr. Taylor has a middle of the road ideology and I have a more liberal one we wouldn't agree on some of his reasoning.

Each chapter goes indepth of different aspects of the idologies of Bryan and Humphrey. In the final chapter Taylor compares the Democratic Party's present stance and future. He states that the Democratic party, even though it started out with a Jeffersonian approach, has now turned into a Hamiltonian party. I disagree with the exception of FDR.

This is a very good book. It gives you the tools to use your brain and come up with your own conclusions. Great read for students and political scientists.
Samut
Jeff Taylor's book is an excellent history of the Democratic party, exploring its history through the ideologies of Jefferson, William Jennings Bryan and Hubert Humpherey. Taylor views Bryan as the last of the populist, middle America Democrats, the type of isolationist, anti-Supreme Court, pro-direct democracy and pro-small government Democrat that is very rare in today's world. Humpherey, and by implication the usual nominees of the Democrats of today, represents a pro-globalist, pro-mass immigration (in spite of its impact on wages), often pro-war, pro-corporate pro-big government, pro-activist Supreme Court. Concerning religion, Bryan also represented a pro-Christian, albeit a populist, "social" Christian outlook that is sorely lacking among current Democratic nominees, though not among its electorate, as is proven by the votes of Democratic leaning voters in referenda and opinion polls on issues as diverse as immigration, abortion and same sex marriage.

Taylor argues that Democratic leaders of today are "Hamiltonians", believers in the concept of a strong central government. Democrats of today would argue that they might be Hamiltonians, but for Jeffersonian ends, i.e. they are for a big federal government but because of the good it will do for the common man. Taylor addresses the validity of this issue somewhat, though I'd like to see more disscussion of just who benefits from big government. I love his analysis of why Democrats have lost their way in terms of their hiding behind the activist Warren courts of the 50's and 60's to get their legislative dirty work accomplished. Taylor points out that it represents a dangerous approach, something that Bryan, with his support of direct democracy (i.e. initiative and referendum) and his opposition to what was at the time considered a conservative, anti-labour judiciary, would have shied away from.

I also enjoyed his discussion about the WW2 era, where liberals such as Sen. Wheeler of Montana, or Lafollette of Wisconsin, became "conservatives" just because they were opposed to our intervention.

Taylor argues that conservative populists such as Buchanan and liberal populists such as Jerry Brown and Ralph Nader actually have a lot in common, far more in common with each other than Buchanan would have with, say, Arlen Specter, or Dennis Hastert, or Nader would have in common with a typical DLC Democrat like Clinton. In France this has been the case in the opposition to France's deepening involvement with the European Union. There, rightist groupings such as the National Front and leftist movements from the Communist Party to other leftist splinter groups have successfully mobilized a majority to vote against the most recent European Union constitution.

I urge anyone who wonders why just because someone is pro-life that means they must be pro-Iraq war, or just because someone is pro-2nd Amendment that means they must be for tax cuts for the rich, or why someone who supports immigration reduction should be anti-union, to read this book. Taylor gives a great overview of a compelling, pro-middle America, pro-common people, pro-conservative values, pro direct democracy heritage in the Democratic party, a Jeffersonian heritage best represented in the 20th Century by William Jennings Bryan.
Adrielmeena
This excellent book outlines the various phases that the Democratic Party has transitioned through the ages since it's founding by Thomas Jefferson. This is a study in Jeffersonism and includes many pages of notes and references. It takes us through the period of William Jennings Bryan and Hubert Humphrey as well as some interesting facts about Thomas Jefferson.

As A Jefferson Family Historian who assisted with the Jefferson-Hemings DNA Study,I was immediately taken with the clarity and thorougness of the author's extensive research on the topics of slavery, religion and the DNA Study.

He elaborates on the first lies by a disreputable reporter and the historical and conjecture and psychological guesswork, unorthodox and questionable conclusions in a book popular among nonacademics but widely dismissed by scholars. Most historians rejected her theory concerning Jefferson and Hemings. The Nature Journal article mischaracterized the DNA results. The historian cowriting this article seemed motivated at least by a desire to excuse the sexual and legal misconduct of the then-current White House occupant. This refers Professor Joseph Ellis who was later exposed by the Boston Globe for lying to his Mt. Holyoke College students about his NON Vietnam service and other personal misstatements. His Nature article was also mistated grosely.

The author points out that an interesting and underreported twist, the DNA tests essentially disproved any genetic tie between Jefferson and the focus of the original Callender allegation, Sally Hemings. DNA proved NO DNA match and thus the long claimed Tom Woodson of family lore and misguided and biased films and TV specials are just that, FICTION. Mr. Jefferson was most adamant in his opposition to miscegenation and the debate may may be nothing more than an interesting diversion, since the scant evidence we have is inconclusive. Mr. Taylor cites referencies such as The Jefferson Myth and the Jefferson-Hemings Controversy: Report of the Scholars Commission.

Herbert Barger, Jefferson Family Historian
Where Did the Party Go?: William Jennings Bryan, Hubert Humphrey, and the Jeffersonian Legacy ebook
Author:
Jeff Taylor
Category:
Humanities
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EPUB size:
1247 kb
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1919 kb
DJVU size:
1627 kb
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Publisher:
University of Missouri; First edition (June 19, 2006)
Pages:
392 pages
Rating:
4.7
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