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Hitler's Stormtroopers and the Attack on the German Republic, 1919-1933 ebook

by Otis C. Mitchell


Hitler was Nazi Germany and Nazi Germany was Hitler.

Hitler was Nazi Germany and Nazi Germany was Hitler. By the time Hitler came to power in January 1933, there were perhaps as many as 400,000 of these brown-shirted men, often self-styled revolutionaries, creating violence on a daily basis and destroying the underpinnings of the Weimar Republic.

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Otis C. Mitchell is professor emeritus of history at the University of Cincinnati. In the first six months of 1933, the SA participated in the "revolution from below" and thus helped Hitler and the Party "coordinate" the private and public sectors. He divides his time between Florida and Ohio. On 22 February 1933, the Prussian Minister of the Interior, Goring, commissioned SA men as "auxiliary police". They now enjoyed a privileged legal status and could legally use force against their enemies. The first SA concentration camps also appeared at this time.

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Reinhard Weber: Das Schicksal der jüdischen Rechtsanwälte in Bayern nach 1933, pp. 128–129, Oldenbourg Wissenschaft Verlag . Mitchell, Otis (2008). McFarland Publishing. 128–129, Oldenbourg Wissenschaft Verlag, 2006. Heinz Höhne: Der Orden unter dem Totenkopf, 1967, p. 83. Bibliography.

The Stormtroopers and the Rise of Hitler. First published in hardback in 2008, this is a history of the rise of the Nazi Party seen through the actions of its paramilitary wing, the Sturmabteilun g (SA) and its role in the destruction of the Weimar Republic. Mitchell then negotiates the complex life of postwar Germany, the consequences of defeat, domestic chaos and mass unemployment, psychological uncertainty, and revolution and counter-revolution, all of which fostered the slow growth of the Nazi movement. Two German Crowns: Monarchy and Empire in Medieval Germany. The Cold War in Germany: Overview, Origins, and Intelligence Wars. A concise history of western civilization.

By the time Hitler came to power in January 1933, there were perhaps as many as 400,000 of these . Otis C. Mitchell is professor emeritus of history at the University of Cincinnati and author of a dozen previous books in the field of German history.

By the time Hitler came to power in January 1933, there were perhaps as many as 400,000 of these brown-shirted men, often self-styled revolutionaries, creating violence on a daily basis and destroying the underpinnings of the Weimar Republic. The book features several photographs captured from the Nazi Party's Central Publishing Facility in Munich and passed to the author in the late 1950s. History Military Nonfiction. More about Otis C. Mitchell.

"Hitler was Nazi Germany and Nazi Germany was Hitler." Thus it is often presented. While this perspective is true to the extent that Hitler's personality, leadership, and ideological convictions played a massive role in shaping the nature of government and life during the Third Reich, the perspective has led most writers since the end of World War II to ignore other aspects of Nazism in favor of biographies or historical works centered solely around Hitler's contributions to the Nazi Party. This book seeks to fill a significant gap in the literature by concentrating particularly on the Nazi Party and its growth during the years of the Weimar Republic, examining the paramilitary presence in Germany and Bavaria after World War I. Most of the book concentrates on the development of the Nazi Storm Detachment (Sturmabteilung, or SA) before and after the failed Beer Hall Putsch in 1923. By the time Hitler came to power in January 1932, there were perhaps as many as 400,000 of these brown-shirted men creating violence on a daily basis and destroying the shaky underpinnings of the Weimar Republic. These young storm troopers, often self-styled revolutionaries, made unparalleled contributions to the ascendancy of the Nazi Party and Hitler's explosive rise to power. The book features several photographs captured from the Nazi Party's Central Publishing Facility in Munich and passed to the author in the late 1950s.
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A summary of the review on StrategyPage.Com:

'First published in hardback in 2008, this is a history of the rise of the Nazi Party focused on its paramilitary wing, the Sturmabteilung (SA) and its role in the destruction of the Weimar Republic. Prof. Mitchell (emeritus Cincinnati) , known for his work in German history, opens with a look at the roots of German militarism, fascism, and anti-Semitism, set against the background of the disaster of 1914-1919. He then negotiates the complex life of postwar Germany, defeat, chaos, mass unemployment, uncertainty, revolution and counter-revolution, and the slow growth of the Nazi movement, with a look not only at the SA but also Hitler and his more notable henchmen. Mitchell’s approach is unusual in some ways, interleaving between some chapters with “Interpolation” that delves more deeply into various aspects of the political and paramilitary scenes in Munich, Bavaria as a whole, and Berlin, at various times. Anyone interested in the rise of the Nazi movement will find this a valuable read. '

For the full review, see StrategyPage.Com
Dagdage
HITLER'S STORMTROOPERS AND THE ATTACK ON THE GERMAN REPUBLIC, 1919-1933
OTIS C. MITCHELL
MCFARLAND PUBLISHING, 2008
HARDCOVER, $55.00, 199 PAGES, PHOTOGRAPHS, NOTES, BIBLIOGRAPHY, INDEX

"Hilter was Nazi Germany and Nazi Germany was Hitler." Though true to the extent that Hitler's personality, leadership, and ideological convictions played a massive role in shaping the nature of government and life during the Third Reich, this popular view has led many writers since the end of World War II to overlook important aspects of Nazism while centering attention solely on Hitler's contribution to the Nazi Party.

The SA or Sturmabteilung, also known as Brown Shirts or Storm Troopers, was the main Nazi paramilitary formation in the 1920s and the early 1930s. In other words, it was the Nazis' private army. This must be understood, however, in a special sense. To be sure, the SA was organized along military lines, trained in the use of firearms, and taught combat techniques. It was also "frequently deployed in violent situations" prior to 1933. But unlike most armies, members of the SA were volunteers "and free to leave the organization" at any time. Moreover, the SA's main function wasn't to conquer territory or defeat an enemy army. Rather, it was propaganda.

The idea for the SA was Hitler's. It began in 1920 as the Ordnerdienst (Order Service) under Emil Maurice. In August, 1921, it changed its name to the Turn-und Sportabteilung (Gymnastic and Sport Division) with a new leader, Hans Ulrich Klintzsch, who greatly expanded its membership. Finally, it became the Sturmabteilung (Storm Detachment) in November, 1921. Herman Goring became the SA head in 1923, with Ernst Rohm SA-Fuhrer from 1924 to 1926, the real leader.

A former Imperial German Army officer, Rohm wanted the SA to cooperate with the Reichswehr (German Armed Forces) in order to undermine the Versailles Treaty. By February, 1923, he transformed the SA into a paramilitary formation. Now largely in the service of the Reichswehr, the SA participated in military exercises alongside other rightest defense leagues. "With this, the SA-and therewith the essential instrument of power for his control of the Party-was wrested from Hitler's hands; in practical terms, he was now not much more than a very successful agitator in the service of the Reichswehr." The consequences of this transformation for the SA's future development and for Hitler's relationship with the Reichswehr were great. Hitler swore "never again to enter into such arrangements with the Reichswehr," whereas the Reichswehr mistakenly felt that it could enlist the Nazi Party's assistance at will.

On 13 April 1932, the Weimar government's minister of the interior outlawed the SA. This was a heavy blow to the NSDAP, but thanks to the machinations of General Kurt von Schleicher, the ban only lasted two months. SA growth continued to increase with membership reaching 700,000 by the end of January, 1933. This meant that the 100,000-man Reichswehr would probably have been incapable of controlling both the SA and the Communists had the Schleicher government, using Article 48 of the Weimar Government constitution, declared a state of emergency. That night, an exhilarated SA participated in the great torchlight march past the new chancellor's window.

In the first six months of 1933, the SA participated in the "revolution from below" and thus helped Hitler and the Party "coordinate" the private and public sectors. On 22 February 1933, the Prussian Minister of the Interior, Goring, commissioned SA men as "auxiliary police". They now enjoyed a privileged legal status and could legally use force against their enemies. The first SA concentration camps also appeared at this time.

After the "coordination" of early 1933 had run its course, the SA no longer had any visible role to play and the "repressed question" reappeared: What will be the SA's future tasks? Hitler's rise to power had made the SA superfluous. Despite this, it continued to grow rapidly. On 1 November 1933, it absorbed a substantial portion of the Stahlhelm veteran's organization. By mid-1934, the SA's program of intimidation, violence, and disruption threatened to discredit and even undermine Hitler's administration. Hitler had a choice: he could "redress the SA's grievances" or bring the SA "forcibly to heel". He chose the latter and initiated Night of the Long Knives.

This book is the product of vast and highly intelligent research. The author has remained analytical and unemotional. This work fills a significant gap in the literature by concentrating particularly on the Nazi Party and its growth during the years of the Weimar Republic, examining the paramilitary presence in Germany and Bavaria after World War I. This account features several photographs captured from the Nazi Party's Central Publishing Facility in Munich. HITLER'S STORMTROOPERS AND THE ATTACK ON THE GERMAN REPUBLIC, 1919-1933 will become the standard reference work on the subject of the SA.

Lt. Colonel Robert A. Lynn, Florida Guard
Orlando, Florida
Hitler's Stormtroopers and the Attack on the German Republic, 1919-1933 ebook
Author:
Otis C. Mitchell
Category:
Humanities
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EPUB size:
1369 kb
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1201 kb
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Publisher:
McFarland (October 1, 2008)
Pages:
199 pages
Rating:
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