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Expected Miracles: Surgeons at Work ebook

by Joan Cassell


Expected Miracles book. Cassell has entered a realm wher Expected Miracles explores the world of surgeons from their own perspective-how they perceive themselves, their work, colleagues, and communities.

Expected Miracles book. Recognizing that surgery is an art, a craft, a science, and a business, Joan Cassell offers, through poignant, painful, and thrilling descriptions, a vivid portrayal of the culture of surgery. Cassell has entered a realm where laypersons are usually horizontal, naked, and anesthetized.

Joan Cassell gives us valuable insight into the mores, the high professional standards-as well as the lapse in and abuse of these standards-and the 'esprit de corps' of the 'fellowship of surgeons. this sub-profession does indeed form a Fellowship whose culture it is important for every prospective patient to understand. Start reading Expected Miracles: Surgeons at Work on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Publisher: Temple Univ Pr. Publish date: 06/01/1991. New (1). Very Good (4). More (6). Seller.

Frederic W. Hafferty.

Expected Miracles: Surgeons at Work. Frederic W.

EXPECTED MIRACLES, SURGEONS AT WORK Cassell .

EXPECTED MIRACLES, SURGEONS AT WORK Cassell J. 676-678. GUERRILLAS AND REVOLUTION IN LATIN AMERICA, A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF INSURGENTS AND REGIMES SINCE 1956 Wickham-Crowley .

Cassell observed 33 surgeons in five North American cities over the course of three years.

Anthropologist Joan Cassell enters this closely guarded arena to explore the . Библиографические данные.

Anthropologist Joan Cassell enters this closely guarded arena to explore the work and lives of women practicing their craft in what is largely a man's world. Cassell observed thirty-three surgeons in five North American cities over the course of three years. We follow these women through their grueling days: racing through corridors to make rounds, perform operations, hold office hours, and teach residents. The Woman in the Surgeon's Body. Издание: иллюстрированное. Philadelphia: Temple University Press. David C Yamada 19 Electronic Monitoring and Control at Work What Is It Good For. University of Pennsylvania. MGMT 104 - Spring 2014.

What does our work mean to us? How did we mature through our training to be prepared to shoulder tremendous responsibility for our patients, to be decisive and technically . Cassell J. Expected Miracles: Surgeons at Work

What does our work mean to us? How did we mature through our training to be prepared to shoulder tremendous responsibility for our patients, to be decisive and technically proficient in a crisis? . Expected Miracles: Surgeons at Work. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1991: xxviii, 281 p. oogle Scholar.

Expected Miracles explores the world of surgeons from their own perspective?how they perceive themselves, their work, colleagues, and communities. Recognizing that surgery is an art, a craft, a science, and a business, Joan Cassell offers, through poignant, painful, and thrilling descriptions, a vivid portrayal of the culture of surgery.

Cassell has entered a realm where laypersons are usually horizontal, naked, and anesthetized. Using the central metaphor of the surgical "miracle," she illuminates the drama of the operating room, where surgeons and patients alike expect heroic performance. She takes us backstage to overhear conversations about patients, families, and colleagues, observe operations, eavesdrop on gossip about surgeons performances, and examine the values, behavior, and misbehavior of surgeons at work.

Said one Chief of Surgery, "You couldnt have a good surgeon who didnt believe in the concept of the Hero." Following this lead, Cassell explores the heroic temperament of those who perform surgical "miracles" and finds that the demands and pressures of surgical practice require traits that in other fields, or in personal interactions, are often regarded as undesirable. She observes, "surgeons must tread a fine line between courage and recklessness, confidence and hubris, a positive attitude and a magical one." This delicate balance and frequent imbalance is portrayed through several character sketches. She contrasts the caring attention and technical mastery of The Exemplary Surgeon with the theatrical posturing of The Prima Donna and the slick showiness and questionable morals of The Sleazy Surgeon.

She also identifies the attributes that surgeons admire in each other. They believe that only peers can really evaluate each other, and, while doctors might not speak negatively about colleagues in public, the community of surgeons exerts considerable pressure on its members to perform competently.

Unlike "doctor-bashing" chronicles, Expected Miracles seeks to understand the charismatic authority of surgeons, its instability, and its price-to surgeons and to patients.

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I read this book anticipating the tremendous insight and empathy for the surgeon's perspective that was so evident in her previous work, "The Woman in the Surgeon's Body". This anticipation soon found its way to dismay, as the characterizations of the surgeons she described in this work bordered on negatively cartoonish. As a woman in a surgeon's body myself, at my most challenged times I do not feel that her assessment tells the true temperature of my primarily male colleagues, or even me. Upon closer inspection, we all deeply grieve and feel sorrow. Her observations and conclusions unfortunately show her own unperceived biases. The message that I would wish that she had shouted from the mountain tops is, "Your surgeon wants the best for you nearly as much as you do! They also carry scars and terrible fears relative to outcomes suffered that were irrelevant to the care they provided. Accuse them of recklessness or the more socially proper term of malpractice, and you serve upon them a terrible contamination of the confidence (NOT hubris, cockiness, or other reckless term) necessary to guide the patient's course toward recovery. Stripping the surgeon of that leaves the patient as a ship without sail or rudder. Perform that on a critical number of talented surgeons, and be prepared to have to look long and far for one who still possesses the qualities necessary to do your case. Please do not misunderstand me. I wish that I could cull out the surgeons who should not carry that high title. If I knew of a method of distillation I would have proposed it to every oversight body that exists. This does not exist, likely for the same reason that a surgeon's ability to foresee the future is dim and imperfect, not to mention the minority of variables they actually have under their control. Read this book if you must, but please carry with you the image of one of your sons or daughters in the attacked and continuously stressful role of the surgeon. Also, remember when conclusions are based upon a housestaff member's observation, you are depending upon one who has never had to carry the weight of responsibility ALONE.
Clodebd
Joan Cassell is a fabulous writer! Her information is so spot on!!
Shalinrad
Too much jargon for a general audience--the writing is dry and pedantic. The descriptions of various surgeons in the book are caricatures rather than nuanced portrayals.
Expected Miracles: Surgeons at Work ebook
Author:
Joan Cassell
Category:
Medicine & Health Sciences
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1499 kb
FB2 size:
1425 kb
DJVU size:
1870 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Temple University Press; Published 1991 edition (June 27, 1991)
Pages:
281 pages
Rating:
4.9
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