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Institute ebook

by James M. Cain


Hortense, will you please tell us what your objection is? I confess, this thing appeals to me a lot more than hospitals do or some angle on education or the various eleemosynary activities I’m constantly being asked to support-as an outlet for this money that’s piling up, and-. Richard, it also appeals to me, as I said. I’m for it. I’ll be glad to help Dr. Palmer in any way I can. If you want to endow his institute, that’s fine, but I won’t be its den mother, which is what I think you want.

Hortense, will you please tell us what your objection is? I confess, this thing appeals to me a lot more than hospitals do or some angle on education or the various eleemosynary activities I’m constantly being asked to support-as an outlet for this money that’s piling up, and-.

The Institute written late in Cain's literary career shows a man who has run out of steam in his literary efforts. This is another late-career James M. Cain novel and is written in his typical, politically incorrect style. Why is that so here? Well, the premise that Cain is working under is well-worn. Power, sex and philanthropy or some such combination in the corridors of Washington and its environs has been done to death both before and after this 1976 effort. I enjoyed it immensely. Lloyd Palmer Ph. and college professor has a scheme to start an institute and approaches philanthropist Richard Garrett for funding.

James Mallahan Cain (July 1, 1892 – October 27, 1977) was an American author and journalist

James Mallahan Cain (July 1, 1892 – October 27, 1977) was an American author and journalist. Cain vehemently opposed labeling, but he is usually associated with the hardboiled school of American crime fiction and is seen as one of the creators of the roman noir. Several of his crime novels inspired successful movies. Cain was born into an Irish Catholic family in Annapolis, Maryland

James M. Cain (1892–1977) was one of the most important authors in the history of crime fiction. Several of his books became equally successful noir films, particularly the classic 1940s adaptations of Mildred Pierce and Double Indemnity. Cain moved back to Maryland in 1948.

James M. Born in Maryland, he became a journalist after giving up on a childhood dream of singing opera. Though he wrote prolifically until his death, Cain remains most famous for his early work.

After that, it began to fall-or, I could even say, plunge. including a man I won’t name. He was from Georgia and was doing a book on Longstreet, who was briefly Lee’s second in command. That doesn’t sound like anything trouble could grow out of, but what that biography did to me shouldn’t happen to any American citizen who pays taxes and obeys the law. This writer was well known. Cain, Hyattsville, Maryland. 13 beğenme · 4 kişi bunun hakkında konuşuyor.

I had never read James M Cain before, but am a big movie buff so of course had seen various adaptations of his big three (Postman, Double Indemnity, Mildred Pierce). After seeing HBO's excellent Mildred Pierce, decided to pick up some random Cain, and started this one just because the title was interesting. This was written in the 70s, much later in his career and is a big stinking mess. It reads more like an SCTV parody of noir t What the heck did I just read?

The Institute – Ebook written by James M. Cain. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read The Institute.

The Institute – Ebook written by James M. An academic looking for money finds a woman and trouble instead. Professor Lloyd Palmer loves a good biography. His fantasy is to start an institute to teach young scholars the biographical arts, and it will take old money to make his dreams come true. Around Washington, the oldest money is found not in the District, but in Delaware, a land of wealth so astonishing that even the Du Ponts are considered nouveau riche.

Books related to The Institute. More by James M. The Complete Crime Stories.

Book by Cain, James M.
Wymefw
To his great credit, James Cain continued to write to the end of his life, even though he found it very difficult to do so. The words didn't come so easily anymore, and he'd lost touch with contemporary culture and relationships. The Institute was his last published novel, written at the advanced age of 85, a few months before his death in 1977. The book is exceedingly weak, and it would be easy to enumerate its many flaws. However, let's be charitable, and recognize it for what it was -- the last published work of a once- great writer. And let's continue to honor James M Cain for his masterpieces published in the 1930s and 40s, stories worth reading and rereading. We might each hope to have the fortitude and persistence to continue to create until life's final curtain.
Mettiarrb
Though not quite as bad as some of his other late in life novels (The Cocktail Waitress and Cloud Nine, for example), The Institute by the once great James M. Cain fails to make the grade. The characters lack credibility and are all unsympathetic, the plot is farfetched and the ending is rushed and off-puttingly sappy.

The Institute is narrated by its main character, Lloyd Palmer PhD., a 28 year old English literature scholar residing in College Park, MD. In Chapter one, Lloyd pays a visit to the fabulously wealthy Richard Garrett to ask him to endow an "institute of biography" in or near Washington, DC. Garrett reacts favorably to Lloyd's request. Since no good deed goes unpunished, Lloyd immediately proceeds to initiate a torrid love affair with Garrett's wife, Hortense.

Thus begins a rather pedestrian love triangle tale with irrelevant side stories about Shakespeare's sonnets and Congressional oversight.

Bottom line: Sad to see James M. Cain become a weak imitation of the great writer he had been forty years earlier.
Danskyleyn
So there was this Swedish housekeeper who did not wear underpants ...

(Spoilers)

This is another late-career James M. Cain novel and is written in his typical, politically incorrect style. I enjoyed it immensely.

Lloyd Palmer PhD., and college professor has a scheme to start an institute and approaches philanthropist Richard Garrett for funding. Garrett takes on the project on the condition that his wife Hortense approves and will be part of the project. Hortense turns out to be much younger than her husband and by the end of the second short chapter, she and Lloyd are banging the daylights out of each other. We are given to understand that Hortense is well above Lloyd's station in life and is ultra attractive, but this is a Cain novel, so that's the way it is supposed to be.

This passionate fling turns out not to be a huge problem, because Richard Garrett wants only the best for his wife ... and the aforementioned Swedish housekeeper for himself. (She seems to resolve an issue with his droopy pecker by lifting up her little Swedish housekeeper uniform at unexpected times). So, all is cool.

Everything sails along as Lloyd begins to build his institute, but then things become complicated. I should mention that he is a former University of Maryland quarterback with many game-winning performances to his credit, all of which seem to have been seen by and remembered in detail by various of the females who appear along the way. These women all seem to need his help getting into and out of their clothing and even Hortense's mom makes such a request.

And then there is Teddy, one of his former students who keeps popping up. Teddy is a sultry looking Latina who seems to have the answers for everything and her sights set on Lloyd.

There is a usual amount of business scheming along the way as well as a Congressional Investigation into the Hortense Garrett Institute of Biography. We are also treated to Dr. Palmer's unorthodox analysis of Shakespeare's sonnets, but ultimately, a couple of the characters get killed and everything comes together in a Cain-style happy ending.
Dandr
The last time I have had a chance to mention the work of James M. Cain, author of the classic noir works The Postman Always Rings Twice and Double Indemnity a couple of novels that take place in the 1930-40's in sunny California, was a later work Mignon set in the Louisiana of the American Civil War days. As usual when I get `high' on an author I like to run through most of his or her work to see where he or she is going with it. Thus, this review of a lesser work, a much lesser work by Cain is something of an obligation. As is familiar to anyone who runs through an author's lifetime of writing efforts not all such endeavors are equal. The Institute written late in Cain's literary career shows a man who has run out of steam in his literary efforts.

Why is that so here? Well, the premise that Cain is working under is well-worn. Power, sex and philanthropy or some such combination in the corridors of Washington and its environs has been done to death both before and after this 1976 effort. In his earlier work, the classic stuff, Cain distinguished himself by writing novels that verged on being `potboilers' but when the dust settled they were little gems of literary insight into how the human psyche operated when it got its `wanting habits' on. Not so here as the plot is predictable concerning the powerful showing off their wealth by endowing an institute of learning and several off-hand rather surreal romances, the twists lead nowhere and in the end it turns into a sappy melodrama as all is forgiven and the main characters (who survive) the brainy Dr. Palmer and beautiful Mrs. Garrett, lovers and newly-hatched parents ride off into the sunset. Give me those chiselin' dames and handy ne'er-do-well guys from the old days anytime. Sorry, James.
Institute ebook
Author:
James M. Cain
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1839 kb
FB2 size:
1291 kb
DJVU size:
1726 kb
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Publisher:
Tower & Leisure Sales Co (February 1, 1982)
Rating:
4.2
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