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Knowledge and the Flow of Information (MIT Press) ebook

by Fred Dretske


The problems Dretske addresses in Knowledge and the Flow of. .

The problems Dretske addresses in Knowledge and the Flow of Information-What is knowledge? How are the sensory and cognitive processes related? What makes mental activities mental?-appeal to a wide audience.

In this provocative book, Fred Dretske argues that to achieve an understanding of the mind it is not enough to.The problems Dretske addresses in Knowledge and the Flow of Information-What is knowledge? How are the sensory and cognitive processes related?

In this provocative book, Fred Dretske argues that to achieve an understanding of the mind it is not enough to understand the biological machinery by means of which the mind does its job. One must understand what the mind's job is and how this task can be performed by a physical system-the nervous system. Naturalizing the Mind skillfully develops a representational theory of the qualitative, the phenomenal, the what-it-is-like aspects of the mind that have defied traditional forms of naturalism. The problems Dretske addresses in Knowledge and the Flow of Information-What is knowledge? How are the sensory and cognitive processes related?

Start by marking Knowledge and the Flow of Information as Want to.There are a lot of dated features in the book.

Start by marking Knowledge and the Flow of Information as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Dretske does act as sort of an interesting preface for a lot of the material, because he does mediate between functionalist and representationalist perspectives in mind, and tries to flesh out some of the salient things his peers get right. Overall, I think that the greatest upshot of this view might be that Dretske actually offers one of the earliest Reading Dretske in the context of a lot of more recent philosophical literature (especially in mind and metaphysics) is really a curious feeling.

This book presents an attempt to develop a theory of knowledge and a philosophy of mind using ideas derived from the mathematical theory of communication developed by Claude .

This book presents an attempt to develop a theory of knowledge and a philosophy of mind using ideas derived from the mathematical theory of communication developed by Claude Shannon  . This book presents an attempt to develop a theory of knowledge and a philosophy of mind using ideas derived from the mathematical theory of communication developed by Claude Shannon. Information is seen as an objective commodity defined by the dependency relations between distinct events. Knowledge is then analyzed as information caused belief. The conceptual tools used to deal with these questions (information, noise, analog versus digital coding, et. are designed to make contact with, and exploit the findings of, empirical work in the cognitive sciences

Fred Dretske's Knowledge and the Flow of Information is an extended attempt to develop a philosophically useful theory of information. Dretske, Fred . 1988, Explaining Behavior, MIT Press/Bradford Books, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Fred Dretske's Knowledge and the Flow of Information is an extended attempt to develop a philosophically useful theory of information. Dretske adapts central ideas from Shannon and Weaver's mathematical theory of communication, and applies them to some traditional problems in epistemology. In doing so, he succeeds in building for philosophers a much-needed bridge to important work in cognitive science. Feldman, Richard: 1985, ‘Reliability and Justification’, The Monist 68, 159–74.

Informationen zum Titel Knowledge and the Flow of Information von Fred Dretske aus der Reihe Bradford .

Informationen zum Titel Knowledge and the Flow of Information von Fred Dretske aus der Reihe Bradford Books Information is seen as an objective commodity defined by the dependency relations between distinct events.

ISBN 10: 0-262-04063-8. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Fred I. Dretske is Nbella and Eloise Maybury Knapp Professor of Philosophy at Stanford University

Fred I. Dretske is Nbella and Eloise Maybury Knapp Professor of Philosophy at Stanford University. For those who already understand the mathematics of information theory, Dretske takes the well-defined mathematical concept of mutual information and evaluates it at a particular value, in symbols: I(S;R ri) H(S)-H(SR ri), where I(S;R ri) is the mutual information, H(S) is the entropy of S, and H(SR ri) is the conditional entropy evaluated at a particular value of R ri. Dretske calls I(S;R ri) the amount of information carried by a particular signal ri.

What distinguishes clever computers from stupid people (besides their components)? The author of Seeing and Knowing presents in his new book a beautifully and persuasively written interdisciplinary approach to traditional problems―a clearsighted interpretation of information theory. Psychologists, biologists, computer scientists, and those seeking a general unified picture of perceptual-cognitive activity will find this provocative reading. The problems Dretske addresses in Knowledge and the Flow of Information―What is knowledge? How are the sensory and cognitive processes related? What makes mental activities mental?―appeal to a wide audience. The conceptual tools used to deal with these questions (information, noise, analog versus digital coding, etc.) are designed to make contact with, and exploit the findings of, empirical work in the cognitive sciences. A concept of information is developed, one deriving from (but not identical with) the Shannon idea familiar to communication theorists, in terms of which the analyses of knowledge, perception, learning, and meaning are expressed. The book is materialistic in spirit―that is, spiritedly materialistic―devoted to the view that mental states and processes are merely special ways physical systems have of processing, coding, and using information.

Tejora
Great read
riki
Dretske starts with Claude Shannon's mathematical theory of communication, and from this foundation, tries to justify a semantic theory of information and explain something about perception, meaning, and belief.

In this book, Dretske reminds one of a philosopher who, upon understanding the beauty in a small portion of applied mathematics, tries to explain the world with his newly found tool. Of course he does not explain the world; only expansive topics of perception, meaning, and belief. Dretske is clearly awed by Shannon's innovative work--we can excuse him for that. Shannon's theory opened up an entire field of study and technology.

For those who already understand the mathematics of information theory, Dretske takes the well-defined mathematical concept of mutual information and evaluates it at a particular value, in symbols:

I(S;R=ri)=H(S)-H(S|R=ri), where I(S;R=ri) is the mutual information, H(S) is the entropy of S, and H(S|R=ri) is the conditional entropy evaluated at a particular value of R=ri. S and R are variables representing source and receiver messages.

Dretske calls I(S;R=ri) the amount of information carried by a particular signal ri. He grounds the entire book on this concept, yet, this foundation nearly becomes irrelevant after he defines the information content of a signal: "A signal r carries the information that s is F" = P(s is F|r,k)=1.

Now Dretske turns to conditional probability for answers to deep philosophical questions. Yet philosophers and scientists are far from understanding the nature of probability itself, and it is not clear that a conditional probability of 1 says anything more than exactly that. You may say that P(X|Y)=1 means that Y carries information about X, but that interpretation adds nothing to our understanding--it simply defines a natural language sentence in terms of a probabilistic sentence. Philosophers looking to justify their work by connecting natural language concepts to math might find this impressive. Others will see it for what it is: using 'big words' or 'mathematical words' to sound smart.

Check out Shannon's original paper on 'information' theory online:
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tref
I was required to read this book in grad school (I was embarrassed for the teacher, since the selection reflects on the selector). It is a genuinely awful book. The style was (for me, at least) indigestible. The main thesis of the book, that *meaning* -- as opposed to bit configurations -- can be *quantified* is not just nonsense, but *frightening* nonsense, since quantifying everything gets funded these days. The book is worth buying if you want to discover how appalling what Joseph Weizenbaum described in his fine book: "Computer Power and Human Reason: From Judgment to calculation" can get!
Gorisar
I WANT TO SEE THE TABLE CONTENTS OF AMAZON BOOKS!!!
Knowledge and the Flow of Information (MIT Press) ebook
Author:
Fred Dretske
Category:
Social Sciences
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1473 kb
FB2 size:
1877 kb
DJVU size:
1391 kb
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Publisher:
MIT Press (March 29, 1983)
Pages:
288 pages
Rating:
4.9
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