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Baudrillard: A Critical Reader ebook

by Douglas M. Kellner


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This Critical Reader" provides the first truly balanced assessment of Baudrillard's contributions to contemporary thought

This Critical Reader" provides the first truly balanced assessment of Baudrillard's contributions to contemporary thought. The writers commissioned for this volume interrogate Baudrillard's positions in terms of specific topics, fields and debates - from his early work on the 'system of objects' to his most recent metaphysical speculations on the fatality of the subject. Douglas Kellner observes in his introduction to the volume: "Baudrillard obviously wants to have it both ways with social theorists thinking that he provides salient perspectives on contemporary social realities, that Baudrillard reveals what is really happening, that he tells it like it is.

Baudrillard: A Critical Reader. Download Product Flyer. His many books include Jean Baudrillard (1989). Douglas Kellner has published widely in aspects of postmodern theory and mass communications. Notes on Contributors. Introduction: Baudrillard in the Fin-de-Millennium: Douglas Kellner (University of Texas). 1. The System of Objects and the Commodification of Everyday Life: The Early Baudrillard: Mark Gottdiener (University of California). 2. The Commodification of Reality and the Reality of Commodification: Baudrillard, Debord, and Postmodern Theory: Steven Best (University of Texas).

Fredric Jameson: A Critical Reader. Douglas Kellner, Sean Homer. Jean Baudrillard: From Marxism to Postmodernism and Beyond. Download (PDF). Читать. Wiley, Oct 20, 1994 - Social Science - 344 pages. Bibliographic information. Baudrillard: A Critical Reader Volume 4 of Blackwell Critical Reader. illustrated, reprint. Category: Общественные науки прочие, Философия, Критическое мышление. 5. 9 Mb. The Persian Gulf TV War (Critical Studies in Communication and in the Cultural Industries).

Find nearly any book by Douglas Kellner . Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Herbert Marcuse and the Crisis of Marxism. ISBN 9780333368305 (978-0-333-36830-5) Hardcover, University of California Press, 1984.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. Kidnapped (Saddleback Illustrated Classics).

Douglas Kellner - Jean Baudrillard: From Marxism to Postmodernism and Beyond Douglas Kellner, Sean Homer - Fredric Jameson: A Critical Reader.

Douglas Kellner - Jean Baudrillard: From Marxism to Postmodernism and Beyond. Douglas Kellner - The Persian Gulf TV War (Critical Studies in Communication and in the Cultural Industries). Douglas Kellner, Sean Homer - Fredric Jameson: A Critical Reader.

Self-described "intellectual terrorist" Jean Baudrillard is one of the most important and provocative writers of the contemporary era. Widely acclaimed as the prophet to postmodernity, he has famously announced the disappearance of the subject, political economy, meaning, truth, the social, and the real in contemporary social formations.
Cobyno
I started on Baudrillard because of his loose association with the Matrix movies, but in Baudrillard I have found much more than just a departure-point for science fiction. I've now read half a dozen major works by or about Baudrillard, and found an astonishing panoply or ideas, literary styles, etc. In addition to brilliant analyses of capitalism, critiques of Marxism, analysis of popular culture, and of course the ubiquitous obituaries of Reality, I've also found a charming and impish sense of humor, a love of provocation and outrage, and a great mind at play.

One of the great problems of critiquing Baudrillard is that it's often hard to tell where Baudrillard is being serious and where he is snickering into his hands. I suspect that for Baudrillard this is just part of the joke: he has created himself a tangled network of irony that serves as a defense against criticism. Douglas Kellner observes in his introduction to the volume: "Baudrillard obviously wants to have it both ways with social theorists thinking that he provides salient perspectives on contemporary social realities, that Baudrillard reveals what is really happening, that he tells it like it is. And yet more cynical anti-sociologists are encouraged to enjoy Baudrillard's fictions, his experimental discourse, his games, and his play. Likewise, he sometimes encourages cultural metaphysicians to read his work as serious reflections on the realities of our time, while winking a pataphysical aside to those skeptical of such undertakings. Thus, it is undecidable whether Baudrillard is best read as science fiction and pataphysics or as social theory."

Which makes the job of the critic - and in particular the critics represented in the present volume - very, very difficult.

The responses assembled in this volume, as far as I'm concerned, strike just about the right tone: a number of them are humorous in one way or another, but they take Baudrillard's ideas seriously. For instance Kim Sawchuk, in a brilliant article titled "Semiotics, Cybernetics, Marketing," titles her first section "I Dream of Johnny," addressing "JB" throughout: "I used to think of you, JB, as I sat at my desk in the marketing research office...."

Some of Baudrillard's ideas are vindicated; others are addressed not so much for their intrinsic value as for their influence on creative endeavors of various artists that have claimed Baudrillard as an influence; and others are roundly criticized. One of the most salient criticisms of Baudrillard is that for all that he writes about "the code" and its supreme importance, he (apparently intentionally infuriatingly) never defines what the [HECK] he is talking about. He seems to mean this, he seems to mean that - he means all by it, and nothing. ("But that is pataphysics", as he would say...)

Other essays explore Baudrillard's classification as "modernist" or "post-modernist" - though my favorite classification, suggested in this volume, is "hyperpoststructuralist" (I think even Baudrillard might smile at that one) - and his influence from Debord and the Situationists.

I would suggest a fairly extensive reading of Baudrillard before approaching this volume. Come to this having read (at the very least) Simulacra and Simulation (The Body, In Theory: Histories of Cultural Materialism); Mark Poster's Jean Baudrillard: Selected Writings: Second Edition would also be very helpful.

So: my overall review of this book is very positive for content - my familiarity with Baudrillard was greatly improved by these analyses and extensions of his ideas. I am giving the book four stars rather than five because of its ubiquitous printing errors (really, there were LOTS of them) and its lack of an index.
Gralsa
Editor Kellner is a big Baudrillard 'expert' and an eminently clever chap who, therefore, needs to take everything terribly seriously, particularly when he's putting his name to "truly balanced assessment of Baudrillard's contributions to contemporary thought". In his introduction, we are warned that "Baudrillard loves to shock and outrage. Some of his antics are highly amusing and provide a level entertainment rarely found in social theory and criticism. Some of his provocations are silly and offensive ..." Antics? Performing dog Baudrillard is not, though it's convenient for academia to treat him as if he were, and as much of this critical collection does: po-facedly analysing his 'tricks', dully pointing out the 'inconsistencies'. "Silly and offensive ..." Oh right - and the world isn't? Aah, who cares.
Where Kellner is right, though, is that Baudrillard's original writings are often very funny and horribly prescient and - if you just go with the flow of the bombast and generalization and accept it as Baudrillard's peculiar manifestation of the 'ecstasy of communication' - eye-opening. So pass on this desperately grave nonsense and enjoy the originals that spawn it.
Thoginn
This book consists of theses, written by researchers in various fields, on various themes such as hyperreality, fashion, capitalism, postmodernism, and feminism. Therefore, I think that there are some theses in which Baudrillardfs thoughts are not understood at all. The constitution of this book is not so good because each researcher mention freely to various notions without big theme that combines each thesis. It is disappointing that discussions on Baudrillard do not develop between each thesis. If each thesis were complementary to each other, this book would be more interesting and more controversial.
Baudrillard: A Critical Reader ebook
Author:
Douglas M. Kellner
Category:
Philosophy
EPUB size:
1733 kb
FB2 size:
1564 kb
DJVU size:
1975 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell; 1 edition (October 20, 1994)
Pages:
344 pages
Rating:
4.6
Other formats:
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