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The Primal Roots of American Philosophy: Pragmatism, Phenomenology, and Native American Thought ebook

by Bruce Wilshire


Bruce Wilshire is Professor of Philosophy at Rutgers University. Recent books include The Moral Collapse of The University: Professionalism, Purity, and Alienation (1990) and Wild Hunger: The Primal Roots of Modern Addictions (1998).

Bruce Wilshire is Professor of Philosophy at Rutgers University. Series: American and European Philosophy. Paperback: 256 pages.

Continuing his quest to bring American philosophy back to its roots, Bruce Wilshire connects the work of such thinkers as Thoreau, Emerson, Dewey . This is not a book about pragmatism and "Native American Thought.

Continuing his quest to bring American philosophy back to its roots, Bruce Wilshire connects the work of such thinkers as Thoreau, Emerson, Dewey, and James with Native American beliefs and practices.

American and European Philosophy. amp;"Bruce Wilshire is an original. His perceptiveness and his passion combine in his writings to create a magical world of present grief and future possibility

American and European Philosophy. His perceptiveness and his passion combine in his writings to create a magical world of present grief and future possibility. This new book is a unique amalgam of scholarly reflection, private soliloquy, emotional release, and spiritual self-cleansing&-a prayer offered up to what Wilshire calls 'the female archetype of a decentralized, pluralistic, and noncontrolling ground of being. amp;' Contrary to much dull philosophy, these essays are written for the human voice; for full impact, they need to be spoken as the. eyes take them i. .

This book calls us both to deprofessionalize American philosophy and to reconnect it with its primal implacement in its own native land.

p. cm. (American and European philosophy) Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 0-271-02025-3 (cloth : alk. paper) ISBN 0-271-02026-1 (pbk. : alk. paper) 1. Philosophy, American19th century. This book calls us both to deprofessionalize American philosophy and to reconnect it with its primal implacement in its own native land. To follow this unaccustomed path is to rediscover what is truly a matter of native.

He knows what the tradition of James, Emerson, and so many others can deliver  . Article in The Journal of Speculative Philosophy 16(4):291-294 · January 2002 with 11 Reads.

Bruce Wilshire, 芦The Primal Roots of American Philosophy禄 University of Wisconsin Press ISBN: 0271020261 .

Bruce Wilshire, 芦The Primal Roots of American Philosophy禄 University of Wisconsin Press ISBN: 0271020261 2000 PDF 241 pages . 8 M. As these connections come into focus, the book shows how European phenomenology was inspired and influenced by the classic American philosophers, whose own work reveals the inspiration and influence of indigenous thought. Wilshire s book also reveals how artifical are the walls that separate the sciences and the humanities in academia, and that separate Continental from Anglo-American thought within the single discipline.

Continuing his quest to bring American philosophy back to its roots, Bruce Wilshire connects the work of such thinkers as Thoreau, Emerson, Dewey, and James with Native American beliefs and practices. His search is not for exact parallels, but rather for fundamental affinities between the equally "organismic" thought systems of indigenous peoples and classic American philosophers.

Wilshire gives particular emphasis to the affinities between Black Elk’s view of the hoop of the world and Emerson’s notion of horizon, and also between a shaman’s healing practices and James’s ideas of pure experience, willingness to believe, and a pluralistic universe. As these connections come into focus, the book shows how European phenomenology was inspired and influenced by the classic American philosophers, whose own work reveals the inspiration and influence of indigenous thought.

Wilshire’s book also reveals how artificial are the walls that separate the sciences and the humanities in academia, and that separate Continental from Anglo-American thought within the single discipline of philosophy.

kolos
I teach a course on William James at John F. Kennedy University, and one of my students came across this fine book and told me about it. Going forward I'm going to be using parts of it for my course. Professor Wilshire has given us a lively, well-informed study of the indigenous-experiential-ecological base within the thought of James, Dewey, Hocking, Bugbee, and other seminal and often-neglected American philosophers. The book's Foreword was provided by Ed Casey, who has written so much and so deeply about the experience of place, particularly in Western culture.

I love quotable books. Read this, in relation to the ongoing scientistic attack on contact with the world: "There is no mirror-lined mental domain in which we can sequester ourselves" (p. 55). Or this: "We do not float in the blue surveying the universe. We are humans sunk over our heads in the thingy and messy world" (p. 81). And a favorite, which I plan to use in my ecopsych course: "It is not merely the blueness of the sky that can possess us if we dilate to it. It is also animals and plants--those with great regenerative powers like snakes, or sage or red willow bark, or roots that regenerate themselves and grow in the dark" (p. 85).

With another reviewer of this book I would like to have heard more about native traditions other than Black Elk's, particularly the influence those found in the places where thinkers like James and Dewey worked and lived. Also, it would be nice to take a break from the customary transpersonalist equation of Native with experiential and hear more about other aspects of Native culture in terms of how they impacted American philosophy. The motif of reanimation is a key one in James' life and also in various Navajo customs, but I don't know of any direct influence and would like to.

Someone (Mencken?) once defined a professional philosopher as a person who upon hearing the statement "the sky is blue today" will ask you what you mean by "sky," by "blue," and by "today." Professor Wilshire's book is a refreshing and urgently needed departure from this kind of bloodless, abstractified, intellectual one-upmanship. He leads the reader along a trail of ideas difficult to take leave of even when the book ends.
Onoxyleili
Bruce Wilshire continues on a fearless path beyond traditional philosophical abstractions and what passes for "common sense" in our culture in order to open up new vistas on reality and the renewal of the spirit. This book takes the reader step by step into a deepening sense of how energies of the cosmos flow through our knowing bodies towards a new vision of existence that resonates with what Wilshire calls "primal philosophy," the mythic, and modern physics. Along the way, the reader is treated with a rereading of American philosophy, especially the work of William James, John Dewey and Charles Pierce, that uncovers the radical energies in their writing and a connection with the philosophical wisdom of Native American tribal groups, other indigenous peoples and the power of the natural landscape. The reader will learn about aspects of American philosophy that are not usually covered, such as Dewey's poetry, Pierce's struggle with his profession or James' inner demons in a way that reveals new dimensions of their thought. Wilshire's book also makes us reconsider the restrictive role of education and of professionals, such as medical practitioners, scientific researchers and philosophy professors in casting our sense of who we are and can be. As his vision develops throughout the book with his repeated consideration of Black Elk's pivotal cure, the reader finds himself or herself in the midst of energy flows and depths of archetypal significance that can liberate us from addictions and our despair over aging, losses, and the death of those we love. Some figures who have been under-appreciated, such as William Earnest Hocking or Henry Bugbee, as well as those who have perhaps been over-appreciated, such as Richard Rorty, are seen in a new light. Other writers, who have been taken to be central to American Letters, Thoreau and Emerson, but who have not been properly appreciated for their philosophical depth are articulated by Wilshire as our key philosophical thinkers. Two major accomplishments of this book are to embody the sense of spirit and to place American philosophy in a different context. Spirit becomes a fleshly phenomenon of the entire Earth communicated among its members in rhythm and song. Wilshire is particularly adept at considering the body-self, as he calls it, in its visceral and passionate engagement. Surprises abound, once American philosophy is no longer seen as a poor relative of European philosophy, but is the unique voice of the power of the Earth and of indigenous peoples coming together with these newer peoples who came to settle this continent. American feminism can be seen in its inspiration from matrilineal Native American traditions, and the shaman is the figure to call us home to kinship with the Earth and its creatures, not the solitary reflective thinker. Philosophy returns to awe and resonance. The books ends with an amazing essay about the spiritual significance of the death of the author's gifted daughter and the energies that may persist beyond this ultimate boundary. We follow Wilshire into an unfathomable depth and find physics and Earth-centered spirituality agreed on welcoming the Unlocatable and the Unsayable.
The Primal Roots of American Philosophy:  Pragmatism, Phenomenology, and Native American Thought ebook
Author:
Bruce Wilshire
Category:
Philosophy
EPUB size:
1786 kb
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1158 kb
DJVU size:
1925 kb
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Publisher:
Penn State University Press (August 2, 2000)
Pages:
256 pages
Rating:
4.5
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