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Milosevic: Portrait of a Tyrant ebook

by Louise Branson,Dusko Doder


Dusko Doder, a native of Yugoslavia, has been a foreign correspondent for The Washington Post and other publications for more than thirty years, covering Eastern Europe, the Soviet Union, and China. Louise Branson is the Washington correspondent for The Scotsman (Edinburgh) and was the Balkan bureau chief for The Sunday Times of London from 1990 to 1996, following assignments in Moscow and Beijing.

Milosevic: Portrait of a Tyrant Hardcover – November 12, 1999. Dusko Doder and Louise Branson's book covers Milosevic's life and path to power up to Kosovo, when NATO bombardment of Belgrade forced him to back down

Milosevic: Portrait of a Tyrant Hardcover – November 12, 1999. by Louise Branson (Author), Dusko Doder (Draft Writer). Dusko Doder and Louise Branson's book covers Milosevic's life and path to power up to Kosovo, when NATO bombardment of Belgrade forced him to back down. The book reveals how Milosevic gave himself a name in 1987, when his boss, Serbian Communist Party leader Ivan Stambolic, sent him to Kosovo to quell down Serbian riots. When confronted by protesters who told them the Kosovo Albanians were beating them, he uttered the phrase, "No one will ever dare beat you again.

Portrait of a Tyrant.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Portrait of a Tyrant. Also by dusko doder and louise branson. Gorbachev: Heretic in the Kremlin. Shadows and Whispers: Power Politics Inside the Kremlin from Brezhnev to Gorbachev.

Dusko Doder and Louise Branson, therefore, have written the first definitive biography of Slobodan Milosevic. A superbly written and chilling portrait of Milosevic. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 19 years ago.

Milosevic : portrait of a tyrant. In this first full-length biography of the Yugoslav leader, veteran foreign correspondents Dusko Doder and Louise Branson paint a disturbing portrait of a cunning politician who has not shied from fomenting wars and double-crossing enemies and allies alike in his ruthless pursuit of power. Whereas most dictators encourage a cult of personality around themselves, Milosevic has been content to operate in the shadows, shunning publicity and allowing others to grab the limelight - and then to take the heat when things go badly.

amp; Branson, Louise. Milosevic : portrait of a tyrant. New York, NY : Free Press. Who is Slobodan Milosevic?"-BOOK JACKET

amp; Branson, Louise. Milosevic : portrait of a tyrant, Dusko Doder and Louise Branson Free Press New York, NY 1999. Australian/Harvard Citation. amp; Branson, Louise. Who is Slobodan Milosevic?"-BOOK JACKET. Is he the next Saddam Hussein, the leader of a renegade nation who will continue to torment the United States for years to come? Or is he the next Moammar Qaddafi, an international outcast silenced for good by a resolute American bombing campaign?"-BOOK JACKET.

Milosevic: Portrait of a Tyrant. by. Dusko Doder (Goodreads Author), Louise Branson. Doder & Branson introduce us to key figures behind Milosevic's rise: his wife, Mirjana Markovic, often justifiably described as a Serbian Lady Macbeth, & the Balkan & US politicians who learned, too late, about the costs of underestimating him. They also reveal how the USA refused to take the necessary action in 1992 to remove him from power without bloodshed-not realizing that he uses such moments of weakness as opportunities to lull his opponents into traps, thereby paving the way for a new consolidation of power. Article in International journal (Toronto, On. 55(2):333 · January 2000 with 26 Reads.

Dusko Doder and Louise Branson talked about their book Milosevic: Portrait of a Tyrant, published by Simon and Schuster. They talked about the life and political career of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic. He was indicted for war crimes in 1998. He was indicted for war crimes in 1998 by the United Nations' International Criminal Tribunal. Topics included his role in the propagation of Serbian nationalistic rhetoric and his role in the Bosnian peace process. They also talked about current issues in the area and foreign policies for the future. They answered questions from members of the audience.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Milosevic: Portrait of a Tyrant by Dusko Doder . 304 page hardback book (2. cm x 16cm - 606gram) published by Free Press 1999. Condition : Dust-jacket near mint condition; very clean & bright, not price-clipped.

304 page hardback book (2. Read full description.

Who is Slobodan Milosevic?

Is he the next Saddam Hussein, the leader of a renegade nation who will continue to torment the United States for years to come? Or is he the next Moammar Qaddafi, an international outcast silenced for good by a resolute American bombing campaign?

The war in Kosovo in the spring of 1999 introduced many Americans to the man the newspapers have called "the butcher of the Balkans," but few understand the crucial role he has played and continues to play in the most troubled part of Europe. Directly or indirectly, Milosevic has waged war and instigated brutal ethnic cleansing in Croatia, Bosnia, and Kosovo, and he was indicted for war crimes in May 1999. Milosevic's rise to power, from lowly Serbian apparatchik to president of Yugoslavia, is a tale of intrigue, cynical manipulation, and deceit whose full dimensions have never been presented to the American public.

In this first full-length biography of the Yugoslav leader, veteran foreign correspondents Dusko Doder and Louise Branson paint a disturbing portrait of a cunning politician who has not shied from fomenting wars and double-crossing enemies and allies alike in his ruthless pursuit of power. Whereas most dictators encourage a cult of personality around themselves, Milosevic has been content to operate in the shadows, shunning publicity and allowing others to grab the limelight -- and then to take the heat when things go badly. Milosevic's secretive style, the authors show, emerged in response to a family history of depression (both of his parents committed suicide) and has served him well as he begins his second decade in power.

Doder and Branson introduce us to the key figures behind Milosevic's rise: his wife, Mirjana Markovic, who is often described (with justification) as a Serbian Lady Macbeth, and the Balkan and American politicians who learned, too late, about the costs of underestimating Milosevic. They also reveal how the United States refused to take the necessary action in 1992 to remove Milosevic from power without bloodshed -- not realizing that he uses such moments of weakness as opportunities to lull his opponents into traps, thereby paving the way for a new consolidation of power. Now, in the wake of the victory in Kosovo, it remains to be seen whether America will learn this lesson or whether we will allow this deeply troubled man to continue to pose a threat to European peace and security as the twenty-first century dawns.

Who is Slobodan Milosevic?

Is he the next Saddam Hussein, the leader of a renegade nation who will continue to torment the United States for years to come? Or is he the next Moammar Qaddafi, an international outcast silenced for good by a resolute American bombing campaign?

The war in Kosovo in the spring of 1999 introduced many Americans to the man the newspapers have called "the butcher of the Balkans," but few understand the crucial role he has played and continues to play in the most troubled part of Europe. Directly or indirectly, Milosevic has waged war and instigated brutal ethnic cleansing in Croatia, Bosnia, and Kosovo, and he was indicted for war crimes in May 1999. Milosevic's rise to power, from lowly Serbian apparatchik to president of Yugoslavia, is a tale of intrigue, cynical manipulation, and deceit whose full dimensions have never been presented to the American public.

In this first full-length biography of the Yugoslav leader, veteran foreign correspondents Dusko Doder and Louise Branson paint a disturbing portrait of a cunning politician who has not shied from fomenting wars and double-crossing enemies and allies alike in his ruthless pursuit of power. Whereas most dictators encourage a cult of personality around themselves, Milosevic has been content to operate in the shadows, shunning publicity and allowing others to grab the limelight -- and then to take the heat when things go badly. Milosevic's secretive style, the authors show, emerged in response to a family history of depression (both of his parents committed suicide) and has served him well as he begins his second decade in power.

Doder and Branson introduce us to the key figures behind Milosevic's rise: his wife, Mirjana Markovic, who is often described (with justification) as a Serbian Lady Macbeth, and the Balkan and American politicians who learned, too late, about the costs of underestimating Milosevic. They also reveal how the United States refused to take the necessary action in 1992 to remove Milosevic from power without bloodshed -- not realizing that he uses such moments of weakness as opportunities to lull his opponents into traps, thereby paving the way for a new consolidation of power. Now, in the wake of the victory in Kosovo, it remains to be seen whether America will learn this lesson or whether we will allow this deeply troubled man to continue to pose a threat to European peace and security as the twenty-first century dawns.

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Dusko Doder and Louise Branson's book covers Milosevic's life and path to power up to Kosovo, when NATO bombardment of Belgrade forced him to back down. The book reveals how Milosevic gave himself a name in 1987, when his boss, Serbian Communist Party leader Ivan Stambolic, sent him to Kosovo to quell down Serbian riots. When confronted by protesters who told them the Kosovo Albanians were beating them, he uttered the phrase, "No one will ever dare beat you again." He became a hero from that day on, a figure to whom the Serbs could rally around.
Milosevic knew that too and betrayed Stambolic, his political mentor, to become president of Serbia. The important things here are the parallels and dissimilarities between Tito and Milosevic. Tito, a communist, wanted a united Yugoslavia, a nation of Slovenes, Croats, Serbs, Montenegrins, Macedonians, Muslims, and Kosovars. Milosevic, a nationalist, wanted a united Serbia, but only for the Serbs. And he wanted to be leader of all Serbs, meaning the Montenegrins, Serbs in Serbia, Bosnian Serbs, and the Krajina Serbs. He even told Milan Panic, Yugoslavia's prime minister, that he was the "Ayatollah Khomeini of Serbia. The Serbs will follow me no matter what."
The trouble with that was, the Serbs in those other areas already had their own leaders, such as Radovan Karadzic, so he had to discredit them or put them down under his thumb, which ultimately didn't work.
Some things that have come to light is the back door deal between Milosevic and then-Croatian president Franjo Tudjman, on dividing Bosnia between them. Milosevic didn't care if he lost the Serb-populated Krajina and Eastern Slavonia, both in Croatia, saying that he would repopulate Kosovo with the Serbs from those regions.
But when the chips fall down, Milosevic used nationalism to get power for himself. The beginning of the end came in the middle of the war in Bosnia, when he was beset by UN sanctions and the Western economic blockade. His own position eroding so he endorsed the Vance-Owen plan to divide Bosnia into ten cantons--3 Serb, 3 Muslim, 2 Croat, 1 (Muslim-Croat), with Sarajevo organized like Washington D.C. Karadzic was vehemently against it and split with Milosevic.
Milosevic was the "man of the hour" at the Dayton talks, in which he agreed to give Sarajevo, the holy grail to Bosnian Serbs, to Muslims, as well as division of Republika Srpska by the Posovina corridor. It was not his to give, but he did it to make himself the good Serb to the West and to cut the Bosnian Serbs down to size. However, this move alienated him from true nationalists such as Karadzic and militia leader Vojislav Sesejl.
Milosevic seems no better than a schoolyard bully. He torments the weak but upon facing someone stronger, backs down, as he did in Kosovo. It took the non-violent student group OTPOR to oust him, but that's another book, which I hope is well-researched and documented like this book.
Moogura
2001: Slobodan Milosevic appeared in court somber-faced; remaining as defiant and arrogant as ever in response to the charges leveled at him by a presiding judge. It seems like he was brought to justice only by chance; consequently his indictment and later arrest proves that no war criminal can hide forever. His name cropped up repeatedly when war in Kosovo broke out in 1998 and more so when NATO forces intervened and bombed rump Yugoslavia throughout the spring and early summer of 1999. Years before, in Bosnia, he was seen as a problem-solver, appeasing opposing parties and mediators at the Dayton Accords. Three years later, he was seen as the opposite: manipulative, conniving, secretive, deceiving and a perpetrator of gross human rights. The question of his life and background has remained constant, one of speculation and mystery.
Dusko Doder and Louise Branson, therefore, have written the first definitive biography of Slobodan Milosevic. Although their work appeared some time before he was overthrown in October 2000 and later brought to justice in The Hague (obviously the biography is now in need of a little bit of revision in order for it to be up-to-date), it helped to place the Kosovo war into its proper context by focusing on Milosevic, who to all intended purposes, ignited the ethnic question in the Serbian province to his own advantage and did not balk at violating human rights toward transforming Kosovo into a province dominated by Serbs.
His early years, through his birth in Pozarevac, Serbia, on August 22, 1941, to his time at Belgrade University where he became a Communist Party member that played an important role in his development, are detailed in this biography. Emphasis is placed on Milosevic's two-faced diplomacy abroad and at home, where friends one day became enemies to be `removed,' just like the people under his rule, seen through the wars in (respectively) Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Kosovo.
The biography is written and reads like a fast-paced novel, filled with all the almost unreal espionage and seedy characters to be ideally found in fiction. A study of Yugoslavia's demise is incomplete without Doder and Branson's magnificent and revealing biography; to date, there are other works coming out, and surely more will appear, but it remains to be seen if they surpass the current.
Arcanefist
Slobodan Milosevic, the President of Serbia, has been called a psychopath, a fascist, a narcissistic dictator, an ultra-nationalist/communist - and in fact he is the first sitting head of state to be accused of war crimes (by the UN war crimes tribunal in the Hague). This superb book provides in vivid detail the "blood-spattered timeline of Milosevic's misrule". The authors are gifted journalists and know what they're talking about, having lived in Belgrade during much of that time, and have thoroughly researched and interviewed principal players for insights into Milosevic's sick personna. They also provide a chilling portrait of Milosevic's partner-in-power wife, Mira, who seems to be even more evil and out of it than her husband. It seems incredible that after steady losses in his dream of a Greater Serbia (in Croatia, Bosnia, and Kosovo), this man Milosevic still remains in power as, essentially, Europe's Saddam Hussein. This absorbing book is must reading for those who want to understand this incredible story.
Milosevic: Portrait of a Tyrant ebook
Author:
Louise Branson,Dusko Doder
Category:
Politics & Government
EPUB size:
1636 kb
FB2 size:
1855 kb
DJVU size:
1206 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Free Press; 1st edition (November 12, 1999)
Pages:
320 pages
Rating:
4.7
Other formats:
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