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Putin's Federal Reforms and Their Implications for Presidential Power in Russia (Essex Papers in Politics Government) ebook

by Matthew Hyde


Putin's Federal Reforms and their Implications for Presidential Power in Russia," Europe-Asia Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(5), pages 719-743. Handle: RePEc:taf:ceasxx:v:53:y:2001:i:5:p:719-743 DOI: 1. 2. Lars P. Feld & Alexander Libman, 2007.

This article examines Vladimir Putin's reforms to Russia's federal system since 2000

This article examines Vladimir Putin's reforms to Russia's federal system since 2000 Nevertheless, by focusing attention on two recent reforms passed in 2003 - on regional government and local self-government - the author argues that Putin's vision of federalism overlooks some crucial aspects underpinning Russia's federal system, namely the existence of ethno-national minorities and the benefits of negotiated autonomy arrangements as a way of accomodating minority nationalism.

Putin's hold over power in Russia. Putin wins a surprisingly narrow majority in his first presidential election, taking 53% of the vote and avoiding a second round run-off. President (second term). Medvedev, who also announced his intention to step down, was appointed to a new position as the deputy chairman of Russia’s Security Council, which is headed by Putin. Russian media reported that government ministers were blindsided by the decision to resign.

Putin’s Federal Reforms and the Accommodation of Difference in. .

3. Jeffrey Kahn, Federalism, Democratization, and the Rule of Law in Russia (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002), p. 27. rossRefGoogle Scholar.

Russia's government has resigned, hours after President Vladimir Putin proposed sweeping constitutional changes that could prolong his stay in power. If approved by the public, the proposals would transfer power from the presidency to parliament

Russia's government has resigned, hours after President Vladimir Putin proposed sweeping constitutional changes that could prolong his stay in power. If approved by the public, the proposals would transfer power from the presidency to parliament. Mr Putin is due to step down in 2024 when his fourth term of office comes to an end. But there is speculation he could seek a new role or hold on to power behind the scenes. Mr Putin put forward his plans in his annual state of the nation address to lawmakers.

Putin’s Federal Reforms and the Accommodation of Difference in Russia in Journal on Ethnopolitics and .

Putin’s Federal Reforms and the Accommodation of Difference in Russia in Journal on Ethnopolitics and Minority Issues in Europe, 3, 2003. Chebankova, Elena, Adaptive Federalism and Federation in Putin’s Russia in Europe-Asia Studies, 60:6, 2008, pp. 989-1009. See Matthew Hyde, Putin’s Federal Reforms and their Implications for Presidential Power in Russia in Europe-Asia Studies, 53:5, 2001, p. 736; C. Ross, Putin’s Federal Reforms and the Consolidation of Federalism in Russia: One Step Forward, Two Steps Back! in Communist and Post-Communist Studies, 36, 2003, p. 34; Andrew Konitzer and Stephen K. Wegren, Federalism and Political.

Putin also proposed multiple amendments to Russia’s constitution . In this context, it is obvious that, as the government, we must provide the president with a capability to make all decisions, which are required to implement the proposed plan, Medvedev said announcing the en-masse resignation. Medvedev became prime minister in 2012, after serving four years as president.

The seven ways Vladimir Putin wants to change Russia's constitution. On January 15 2019 in his annual address to Russia’s Federal Assembly, Putin sprang yet another surprise package of changes, signalling the beginning of a transition period that could last up to the end of his fourth dated term of office in 2024. The speech fired the starting gun on another managed succession, although Putin’s personal role at the end of this time is unclear. It appears he is seeking to create a management structure for the country’s affairs without his direct involvement.

27 See Alexander, James, ‘Federal Reforms in Russia: Putin's Challenge to the Republics’, Demokratizatsiya, 12: 4 (2004), pp. 233–63; and Hyde, Matthew, ‘Putin's Federal Reforms and their Implications for Presidential Power in Russia’, Europe-Asia Studies, 53: 5 (2001), p. 233–63; and Hyde, Matthew, ‘Putin's Federal Reforms and their Implications for Presidential Power in Russia’, Europe-Asia Studies, 53: 5 (2001), pp. 719–43. 28 For an analysis of the effects of this law during the 2003 Duma election, see Moraski, Bryon, ‘Mandating Party Development in the Russian Federation: Effects of the 2001 Party Law’, Journal of Elections, Public Opinion, and Parties, 16: 3 (2006), pp. 199–219.

With the clock running down on Mr. Putin’s final term, Russia’s political class has been abuzz for months with . Putin’s final term, Russia’s political class has been abuzz for months with speculation about his intentions. Some predicted a destabilizing succession crisis, but most were expecting the president to find a way to keep power despite constitutional term limits, as he did in 2008. Already in power as either president or prime minister for 20 years, longer than all modern Kremlin leaders since Stalin, Mr. Putin has now calmed an incipient and potentially disruptive succession struggle by leaving would-be successors and their backers in powerful agencies like the Federal Security Service guessing about what, exactly, they would be struggling over.

Putin's Federal Reforms and Their Implications for Presidential Power in Russia (Essex Papers in Politics  Government) ebook
Author:
Matthew Hyde
Category:
Politics & Government
EPUB size:
1520 kb
FB2 size:
1764 kb
DJVU size:
1616 kb
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Publisher:
University of Essex Dept.of Government (December 21, 2000)
Pages:
37 pages
Rating:
4.3
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