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Life on the Brink: Environmentalists Confront Overpopulation ebook

by Philip Cafaro,Eileen Crist,Albert Bartlett,Amy Gulick,Anne Ehrlich,Charmayne Palomba,Dave Foreman,Donald Weeden,Earth Policy Institute,George Wuerthner,Jeffrey McKee,Joseph Bish,Leon Kolankiewicz,Lester Brown,Martha Campbell,Paul Ehrlich,Captain Paul Watson,Richard Lamm,Roderick Nash,Ronnie Hawkins,Stephanie Mills,Thomas Butler,Tim Palmer,William R. Catton Jr.,William Ryerson,Winthrop Staples III,Robert Engelman


Every contribution is worth reading. Cafaro is a philosopher and it is reflected in his own beautifully written contributions including the epilogue where he considers whether humanity is a cancer on the earth.

Contributors: Albert Bartlett, Joseph Bish, Lester Brown, Tom Butler, Philip Cafaro, Martha Campbell .

Contributors: Albert Bartlett, Joseph Bish, Lester Brown, Tom Butler, Philip Cafaro, Martha Campbell, William R. Catton J. Eileen Crist, Anne Ehrlich, Paul Ehrlich, Robert Engelman, Dave Foreman, Amy Gulick, Ronnie Hawkins, Leon Kolankiewicz, Richard Lamm, Jeffrey McKee, Stephanie Mills, Roderick Nash, Tim Palmer, Charmayne Palomba, William Ryerson, Winthrop Staples III, Captain Paul Watson, Don Weeden, George Wuerthner.

Albert Bartlett; Amy Gulick; Anne Ehrlich . Life on the Brink is an invitation to join the discussion about the great work of building a better future. Contributors: Albert Bartlett, Joseph Bish, Lester Brown, Tom Butler, Philip Cafaro, Martha Campbell, William R.

So we hope you’ll read Life on the Brink to help sort out these matters. contributors al bartlett, lester brown, martha campbell, robert engelman, dave foreman, ronnie hawkins, richard lamm, roderick nash, jeffery mckee, stephanie mills, tim palmer, captain paul watson, and fourteen.

From the foreword by Paul and Anne Ehrlich.

Life on the Brink aspires to reignite a robust discussion of population issues among environmentalists, environmental studies scholars, policymakers, and the general public. From the foreword by Paul and Anne Ehrlich.

Life on the Brink : Environmentalists Confront Overpopulation Contributors: Albert Bartlett, Joseph Bish, Lester Brown, Tom Butler.

Life on the Brink : Environmentalists Confront Overpopulation.

Life on the Brink aspires to reignite a robust discussion of population issues among environmentalists . In defense of nature and of a vibrant human future, contributors confront hard issues regarding contraception, abortion, immigration, and limits to growth that many environmentalists have become too timid or politically correct to address in recent years. Ending population growth will t happen easily.

Similar books and articles Marsha L. Richmond, Paul Lawrence Farber, Hannah Landecker, Vassiliki Betty Smocovitis, Eileen Crist, Chris Young & Sara F. Tjossem - 1998 - Journal of the History of Biology 31 (3. .

Similar books and articles. Marsha L. Tjossem - 1998 - Journal of the History of Biology 31 (3):447-461. Philip Cafaro - 1998 - Philosophy Today 42 (1):26-39.

Life on the Brink: Environmentalists Confront Overpopulation . Not so Paul and Ann Ehrlich, who open Life on the Brink with a powerful Foreword. As Eileen Crist states, if animal life had been placed on an existential par with human life – or had animals been recognized as subjects of their lives – then their exploitation and that of their homelands would have been rendered morally unfeasible.

The Brink: Environmentalists Confront Overpopulation By Philip Cafaro. Question: Need A Summary Of Life On The Brink: Environmentalists Confront Overpopulation By Philip Cafaro And Eileen Crist.

Need A Summary Of Life On The Brink: Environmentalists Confront Overpopulation By Philip Cafaro. Identify Main Problems/themes As Well As Solutions/expected Outcomes. Please Be Specific And Include Important Page Numbers If Particularly Important Information Is Located On That Page. A Long Summary Would Also Be Preferable. This problem has been solved! See the answer.

Life on the Brink aspires to reignite a robust discussion of population issues among environmentalists, environmental studies scholars, policymakers, and the general public. Some of the leading voices in the American environmental movement restate the case that population growth is a major force behind many of our most serious ecological problems, including global climate change, habitat loss and species extinctions, air and water pollution, and food and water scarcity. As we surpass seven billion world inhabitants, contributors argue that ending population growth worldwide and in the United States is a moral imperative that deserves renewed commitment.

Hailing from a range of disciplines and offering varied perspectives, these essays hold in common a commitment to sharing resources with other species and a willingness to consider what will be necessary to do so. In defense of nature and of a vibrant human future, contributors confront hard issues regarding contraception, abortion, immigration, and limits to growth that many environmentalists have become too timid or politically correct to address in recent years.

Ending population growth will not happen easily. Creating genuinely sustainable societies requires major change to economic systems and ethical values coupled with clear thinking and hard work. Life on the Brink is an invitation to join the discussion about the great work of building a better future.

Contributors: Albert Bartlett, Joseph Bish, Lester Brown, Tom Butler, Philip Cafaro, Martha Campbell, William R. Catton Jr., Eileen Crist, Anne Ehrlich, Paul Ehrlich, Robert Engelman, Dave Foreman, Amy Gulick, Ronnie Hawkins, Leon Kolankiewicz, Richard Lamm, Jeffrey McKee, Stephanie Mills, Roderick Nash, Tim Palmer, Charmayne Palomba, William Ryerson, Winthrop Staples III, Captain Paul Watson, Don Weeden, George Wuerthner.

Ueledavi
Over-population. The root of all the Earth's problems. If the fertility rate stays the same, by 2100 the Earth may be heaving under the weight of 26 billion humans, according to the UN. Other than humans, rats, and insects, there will be no place for any other animals to live.

And yet, politicians, academics, and journalists refuse to discuss over-population for fear of being called "racist", "inhuman", or worse. But it is the elephant in the room.
TheFresh
Want to know what those Green Peace nuts are all up in arms about? This book just might have you considering to join their cause. You can't consider yourself a well-informed and level headed member of democracy without hearing both sides of our most important issues. The end of the world is a pretty pressing issue don't you think? Give this book a try. If you can read it cover to cover without being worried please tell me what you know that I don't.

Philip Cafaro is a diamond in the rough of academics who don't know a pen from a microphone. It too bad he still doesn't know what proper marketing is.
Ffel
Uncomfortable truths. One of the most important books of our time. Maybe the most important. Everyone (including environmentalists and environmental groups) refuses to talk about overpopulation, which essentially tells you that overpopulation urgently needs to be talked about. Well written to boot.
Samugul
Every now and again a book or article about population comes along that changes your life or at least your way of thinking. For me, three stand out: 'The Population Bomb' by Paul Ehrlich (1968); 'The Coming Anarchy' by Rober D Kaplan (Atlantic Monthly, February 1994) and 'Overshoot: The Ecological Basis of Revolutionary Change' by William Catton Jnr (1980). Now a fourth book, 'Life on the Brink', joins those three as a game-changer. The title of the book is apt: overpopulation is indeed pushing life on Earth to the brink.

Editors Philip Cafaro and Eileen Crist have gathered together essays from virtually everyone who is anyone in the population movement today, not least the above-mentioned Paul (with Anne) Ehrlich as well as William Catton Jnr. But we hear also from the great Al Bartlett, Lester Brown, William Ryerson, Leon Kolankiewicz, Martha Campbell, Dave Forman, Bob Engelman and a host of others. Every contribution is worth reading.

Cafaro is a philosopher and it is reflected in his own beautifully written contributions including the epilogue where he considers whether humanity is a cancer on the earth. Perhaps it prompted the recent comment by British naturalist and broadcaster David Attenborough that humans are a plague upon the Earth. Whether it did or not, reading this book will leave you concluding that indeed we, with our excessive numbers, are a cancer or a plague. As the editors themselves and many contributors point out, population growth is a major driver of ecological destruction. This not only affects other species, it affects us for we are wholly dependent on the planet's natural processes for providing us with life's necessities: clean air and water, food, pollination and a liveable climate.

But that is not to say it is all depressing. Amy Gulick in a wonderful essay called 'Salmon in the Trees' describes the pristine wilderness of Tongass National Forest in southeast Alaska where salmon have come to spawn and die, bears gather to feed on the salmon and bald eagles fly overhead. 'When the cycle of life is whole, so are we,' she writes. 'If we can change our relationship with Earth, we can change our population so as not to damage our life-support systems.'

It may be too late, of course, to turn the population ship Titanic around before we lose thousands of species in this, the sixth great mass extinction. Let's hope not. Certainly, this excellent book will help inform the public and decision-makers that we need to act to end population growth, and we need to do it now.
Zaryagan
Well-chosen chapters on some of the most important thinking about the most important issue facing all of us. The Cliff notes or comic book should be required reading for every human being! Overpopulation is the third rail of the climate change problem, and therefore , ironically, the most important one to become knowledgeable about. This book is a great place to start.
Winotterin
This is a timely and important book for anyone who cares about the environment or the future of the planet (are you listening Sierra Club?).

In one popular version of Chief Seattle's letter it says:

This we know: the earth does not belong to man, man belongs to the earth. All things are connected like the blood that unites us all. Man did not weave the web of life, he is merely a strand in it. Whatever he does to the web, he does to himself.

With the increasing urbanization and technological gadgetry that occupies our lives, it is easy to forget this simple truth. The rich biodiversity and wildness of the world is disappearing at an alarming rate. It high time to move beyond the political correctness so often associated with social justice movements such as now found in the current immigration debate and speak to how population, combined with consumption, is affecting our world. While the authors of the various essays that comprise this book are compassionate towards the plight of others, they present a clear-sighted recognition of the necessity to take action against a mindless wave of increasing population within the borders of the United States as well as the daunting challenges faced by an ever increasing global population.

Birth rates may be dropping but worldwide population numbers are still rising by 70 to 80 million people annually. We have already done sufficient damage to the planet to alter the climate with current population levels, just imagine what we could do with several billion more people in the foreseeable future.
The earth is not just a resource to feed our insatiable economy. Beyond an anthropocentric point of view, beyond a liberal egalitarian social justice point of view, the denizens of the earth have an inherent right to life and our lives are the richer for it.

This book makes the case for a viable population level that secures and enhances the diversity of life on the earth--a diversity that not only makes all life possible, but allows the human citizens of the Earth to experience the wonder and awe that can be found in nature and, with it, an experience of Mystery.
Truthcliff
My only disappointment is that it is not available on Kindle.
Life on the Brink: Environmentalists Confront Overpopulation ebook
Author:
Philip Cafaro,Eileen Crist,Albert Bartlett,Amy Gulick,Anne Ehrlich,Charmayne Palomba,Dave Foreman,Donald Weeden,Earth Policy Institute,George Wuerthner,Jeffrey McKee,Joseph Bish,Leon Kolankiewicz,Lester Brown,Martha Campbell,Paul Ehrlich,Captain Paul Watson,Richard Lamm,Roderick Nash,Ronnie Hawkins,Stephanie Mills,Thomas Butler,Tim Palmer,William R. Catton Jr.,William Ryerson,Winthrop Staples III,Robert Engelman
Category:
Politics & Government
EPUB size:
1741 kb
FB2 size:
1523 kb
DJVU size:
1492 kb
Language:
Publisher:
University of Georgia Press (December 1, 2012)
Pages:
352 pages
Rating:
4.7
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