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The Underclass ebook

by Ken Auletta


Ken Auletta is widely known today for his books and New Yorker articles on America’s major media, advertising . His book, The Underclass, published in 1982, has been largely forgotten

Ken Auletta is widely known today for his books and New Yorker articles on America’s major media, advertising and communications companies. His book, The Underclass, published in 1982, has been largely forgotten. But it is worth a reconsideration, for it provides perspective on today’s poverty and unemployment

Kenneth B. Auletta (born April 23, 1942) is an American writer, journalist and media critic for The New Yorker. Auletta, the son of an Italian-American father and a Jewish-American mother, grew up in Coney Island, Brooklyn, where he attended Abraham.

Kenneth B. Auletta, the son of an Italian-American father and a Jewish-American mother, grew up in Coney Island, Brooklyn, where he attended Abraham Lincoln High School. Auletta is a graduate of State University of New York at Oswego (SUNY Oswego), and received his . in political science from Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University.

Auletta has appeared on numerous television programs and written several books, including Three Blind Mice: How the TV Networks Lost Their Way; Greed and Glory On Wall Street: The Fall of The House of Lehman; World War . : Microsoft and Its Enemies; Media Man: Ted Turner's Improbable Empire; and Googled: The End of the World As We Know It. Библиографические данные.

Originally published as a three-part series in The New Yorker, Ken Auletta's seminal piece of reportage, The Underclass, has been deemed the classic study of poverty in America.

by. Auletta, Ken. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by sf-loadersive. org on January 22, 2010.

Bestselling writer, journalist, and media critic Ken Auletta was born on April 23, 1942. He grew up in Brooklyn, New York and earned a . from SUNY Oswego and an . in political science from the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University.

Ken Auletta began contributing to The New Yorker in 1977 and has written the Annals of Communications since 1993. He has been a Pulitzer Prize juror, and for more than three decades a judge of the annual Livingston Awards for Young Journalists. He has been selected as a literary lion by the New York Public Library, has twice served as a board member of PEN, and was a trustee of the Public Theatre/New York Shakespeare Festival. He is at work on his thirteenth book. Annals of Communications. How the Math Men Overthrew the Mad Men.

I first read this book back in 1986 as a political science undergraduate. Out of the hundreds of political books I've read, this is one of the most memorable. Auletta approaches the subject of the urban poor in a completely objective and disinterested way, as a journalist should. He immerses himself in the lives and personal backgrounds of poor people and documents their journey through various federal job training programs.

Overlook Press, 1999 - 416 sayfa

Overlook Press, 1999 - 416 sayfa. Originally published as a three-part series in The New Yorker, Ken Auletta's seminal piece of reportage, The Underclass, has been deemed the classic study of poverty in America. Now with the boom years of the Reagan era and its concomitant recession behind us, Auletta revisits his subject, examining whether the "war on poverty" has made any progress in the fifteen years since the book's first publication

Auletta began with a seemingly simple goal - to find out who, exactly, make up the poorest of the poor, and to trace the many paths that took them there. As he follows 250 harden members of the underclass, Auletta focuses on efforts to help them reconstruct their lives and find a functional place in mainstream society. Through the lives of the men and women he encounters, Auletta discovers the complex truths that have made hard-core poverty in America such an intractable problem.
Nern
Interesting book. In better condition than I was expecting. Thank you Best and Fastest Books.
Mmsa
I first read this book back in 1986 as a political science undergraduate. Out of the hundreds of political books I've read, this is one of the most memorable.

Auletta approaches the subject of the urban poor in a completely objective and disinterested way, as a journalist should. He immerses himself in the lives and personal backgrounds of poor people and documents their journey through various federal job training programs. Auletta also discusses the arguments put forth by both advocates and opponents of such programs (like Michael Harrington and Thomas Sowell) and fairly examines both the strengths and weaknesses on both sides of the issue. Most importantly, he evaluates these viewpoints based upon the actual lives and experiences of those who participate in the training programs.

In a day when too many "journalists" use their platforms for editorializing, Auletta does his profession proud. He sticks to reporting the facts, and gives a balanced view of all sides of the issue.
Direbringer
Whenever there's president election, candidates don't talk about welfare policy much because simply it's not people's popular issue. Ken Auletta described the reality of underclass, more definted term for low class, and shows the reality through real examples. When there aren't that many books on welfare system, this one's good one to really find out about the reality. Reading's not difficult and very informative.
MrCat
Auletta provides a thorough and sensitive study of the underclass in one of the most depressed neighborhoods of New York City. The book focuses on personal accounts of a job-training program participates, with nationally significant statistics to reinforce the message. The discussion of attitudes and politics driving the country's perception of the poor is enlightening and will provide material for heated discussion for those who agonize over the problems faces by inner city neighborhoods. This book is a solid piece of research and well worth the read for anyone interested in urban issues, racism, welfare, and the idea of a perpetual and permanent class that can not assimilate to mainstream society.
The Underclass ebook
Author:
Ken Auletta
Category:
Politics & Government
EPUB size:
1694 kb
FB2 size:
1676 kb
DJVU size:
1112 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Overlook Books; Revised, Updated edition (April 1, 1999)
Pages:
348 pages
Rating:
4.5
Other formats:
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