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Creeping Conformity: How Canada Became Suburban, 1900-1960 (Themes in Canadian History) ebook

by Richard Harris


Creeping Conformity, the first history of suburbanization in Canada, provides a geographical perspective – both physical and social – on Canada's suburban past. Shaped by internal and external migration.

Creeping Conformity, the first history of suburbanization in Canada, provides a geographical perspective – both physical and social – on Canada's suburban past.

Creeping Conformity, the first history of suburbanization in Canada, provides a geographical perspective - both physical and social - on Canada's suburban . .Series: Themes in Canadian History. Published by: University of Toronto Press.

Creeping Conformity book. Start by marking Creeping Conformity: How Canada Became Suburban, 1900-1960 (Themes in Canadian History Book 7) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Creeping Conformity, the first history of suburbanization in Canada, provides a geographical perspective - both physical and social - on Canada's suburban past

Creeping Conformity, the first history of suburbanization in Canada, provides a geographical perspective - both physical and social - on Canada's suburban past. Shaped by internal and external migration, decentralization of employment, and increased use of the streetcar and then the automobile, the rise of the suburb held great social promise, reflecting the aspirations of Canadian families for more domestic space and home ownership.

Richard Harris, Creeping Conformity: How Canada Became Suburban, 1900-1960 (Toronto, Buffalo and London, University of Toronto Press, 2004), x + 205pp. He argues the trend towards today's Canadian suburban conformity only began as a result of government intervention, in particular the adoption of national building standards in the 1940s, and the introduction of rigorous provincial planning legislation after 1945. Harris condemns the 'fastidious disdain' for the suburb in the writing of British social historian, .

Creeping Conformity: How Canada Became Suburban, 1900-1960 (2004). Lorimer, James, and Evelyn Ross. The Second City Book: Studies of Urban and Suburban Canada (1977). Johns Hopkins University Press, 2001. Ideal Surroundings: Domestic Life in a Working-Class Suburb in the 1920s (Studies in Gender and History) (1995). Suburb, Slum, Urban Village: Transformations in Toronto's Parkdale Neighbourhood, 1875-2002 (2010).

How we measure 'reads'

2. 0 hbk, £1. 5 pbk Richard Harris, Creeping Conformity: How Canada Became Suburban, 1900–1960. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2004. 2. 5 pbk. Article in Urban History 32(01):187 - 189 · May 2005 with 14 Reads. How we measure 'reads'.

Creeping Conformity: How Canada Became Suburban 1900–1960, Richard Harris. University of Toronto Press, Toronto (2004). oceedings{Moore2006CreepingCH, title {Creeping Conformity: How Canada Became Suburban 1900–1960, Richard Harris. University of Toronto Press, Toronto (2004)}, author {Susan F. Moore}, year {2006} }. Susan F. Moore.

Haïti - Face au passé. Creeping Conformity: How Canada Became Suburban, 1900-1960. Harris indicates three major themes to be covered in this book. First is the issue of suburban, . You are on Érudit's new platform. the demonstration of how Canadian suburbs have moved increasingly away from diversity to the stereotyped homogenous entities of today. Much of this argument is built on the continued expansion of municipal and federal housing and mortgage regulations. Second is the question of how the house and social life are connected.

Recommend this journal.

Creeping Conformity, the first history of suburbanization in Canada, provides a geographical perspective –both physical and social –on Canada's suburban past. Shaped by internal and external migration, decentralization of employment, and increased use of the streetcar and then the automobile, the rise of the suburb held great social promise, reflecting the aspirations of Canadian families for more domestic space and home ownership.

After 1945 however, the suburbs became stereotyped as generic, physically standardized, and socially conformist places. By 1960, they had grown further away – physically and culturally –from their respective parent cities, and brought unanticipated social and environmental consequences. Government intervention also played a key role, encouraging mortgage indebtedness, amortization, and building and subdivision regulations to become the suburban norm. Suburban homes became less affordable and more standardized, and for the first time, Canadian commentators began to speak disdainfully of 'the suburbs,' or simply 'suburbia.' Creeping Conformity traces how these perceptions emerged to reflect a new suburban reality.

Creeping Conformity: How Canada Became Suburban, 1900-1960 (Themes in Canadian History) ebook
Author:
Richard Harris
Category:
Politics & Government
EPUB size:
1507 kb
FB2 size:
1413 kb
DJVU size:
1474 kb
Language:
Publisher:
University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division (June 16, 2004)
Pages:
160 pages
Rating:
4.5
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