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The Prince of the Marshes: And Other Occupational Hazards Of A Year In Iraq ebook

by Rory Stewart


His tale, wryly told, demonstrates the crazy quilt political context.

His tale, wryly told, demonstrates the crazy quilt political context. The Prince of the Marshes (an autocrat from the old Marsh region of southern Iraq), Iranian loyal Shi'ites, and Sadrists (followers of Muqtada al-Sadr) competed with one another for power. In addition, Sheikhs loyal to their own tribes intruded themselves into the process.

Rory Stewart, a young British diplomat, is appointed as the coalition deputy governor (CPA deputy governorate coordinator) of a province of 850,000 people in the southern marshland.

Occupational Hazards: My Time Governing in Iraq or The Prince of the Marshes: And other Occupational Hazards of a Year in Iraq is a 2006 non-fiction book by the British writer and later Member of Parliament Rory Stewart.

Prince of the Marshes. Rory Stewart is a certified crazy person

Prince of the Marshes. Rory Stewart is a certified crazy person. He proved this by walking across Asia, including Afghanistan. The end of Prince of the Marshes was relatively predictable- I don't think I'm spoiling it for anyone when I tell you that Rory Stewart did not bring lasting peace, love and unicorns to southern Iraq. He did spend a lot of time savaging the Italians in a way I don't think an American would feel comfortable doing publicly.

In August 2003, at the age of thirty, Rory Stewart took a taxi from Jordan to Baghdad. A Farsi-speaking British diplomat who had recently completed an epic walk from Turkey to Bangladesh, he was soon appointed deputy governor of Amarah and then Nasiriyah, provinces in the remote, impoverished marsh regions of southern Iraq. He spent the next eleven months negotiating hostage releases, holding elections, and splicing together some semblance of an infrastructure for a population of millions teetering on the brink of civil war. The Prince of the Marshes tells the story of Stewart’s year.

Электронная книга "The Prince of the Marshes: And Other Occupational Hazards of a Year in Iraq", Rory Stewart

Электронная книга "The Prince of the Marshes: And Other Occupational Hazards of a Year in Iraq", Rory Stewart. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Prince of the Marshes: And Other Occupational Hazards of a Year in Iraq" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Occupational Hazards" is the UK version of the book This book was first published by Picador in London in June this year, with the title "Occupational Hazards: My Time Governing in Iraq".

Occupational Hazards" is the UK version of the book. That being said, if the Iraq war interests you in any way, even if you are a partisan of the pro-war or anti-war persuasion, read this book. Rory Stewart was a member of the CPA (Coalition Provisional Authority. In August of 2003, Rory Stewart (known to the Arabs of southern Iraq as Seyyd Rory) "took a taxi from Jordan to Baghdad to ask for a job from the Director of Operations". This was four months after the Coalition invasion. This book was first published by Picador in London in June this year, with the title "Occupational Hazards: My Time Governing in Iraq".

Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. The prince of the marshes : and other occupational hazards of a year in Iraq Rory Stewart.

Henry Lloyd-Hughes as Rory Stewart in Occupational Hazards. Stewart – currently seeking re-election as a Tory MP – is the pivotal figure of the story. Photograph: Marc Brenner. There have been plays, such as David Hare’s Stuff Happens, that examined the causes of western intervention in Iraq. Having been a diplomat and foot-slogging explorer of the Middle East, he volunteers his services to the newly created Coalition Provisional Authority in Baghdad in 2003. He is deputed by its chief, Paul Bremer, to go to the south to Maysan and help create a modern, secular Iraq. The play charts his attempts to impose a democratic structure on the province’s hostile factions.

In August 2003, Rory Stewart took a taxi from Jordan to Baghdad. A Farsi-speaking British diplomat, he was soon appointed deputy governor of Amarah and then Nasiriyah, provinces in the remote, impoverished marsh region of southern Iraq. Stewart takes us inside the occupation and beyond the Green Zone, introducing us to a colourful cast of Iraqis and revealing the complexity and fragility of a society we struggle to understand.
Shakagul
This story shows why it is so difficult to transfer an Anglo-American republican democracy to a country with a variable culture(s), more closely structured political (almost familial) loyalties. No knowledge of "democratic procedures" and no desire for same exist. The book is well-written, honest and makes one aware that no Anglo-American political system can be grafted on a functioning "clannish" culture. The story should be widely read. I concur with ?Kissinger's comment that: "Yes, that dictator is an s.o.b., but he is our s.o.b."
MEGA FREEDY
Rory Stewart's account of his time as a CPA administrator in Iraq in 2003-2004 is gripping, personal and thought-provoking. I would recommend it to anybody seeking an insight into post-2003 Iraq that is more substantial than agitprop, and in particular the following audiences:

1. Anybody who thinks there is a 'quick and easy' template for postconflict or COIN, in particular,those (like Francis Fukuyama) who supported removing Saddam in 2003 and then absolved themselves of any responsibility for what happened next rather than making any effort to help put it right.
2. Anybody who likes the sound of using military power to enforce 'regieme change' or some other punitive measure and then leaving the locals to it.
3. Anybody who looks at 'far off places of which we know little' and thinks that they just don't want liberty and a civic society badly enough - it's a bit difficult when nobody is willing to protect the good, gentle and public minded from theocratic thugs.
4. Anybody who (while safe and secure in the West) thinks a victory by the aforementioned theocratic thugs is preferable than anything that could possibly be construed as a victory by the US.
5. Anybody who is firmly convinced that everything would be OK if 'stupid Americans' just did what they were told by more sophisticated Europeans in general(or, in particular, the 'more experienced British').
6. Anybody who thinks that in much of the world equitable, secular civic societies will flourish if only meddling westerners will leave them alone.

No easy answers can be found in Stewart's book, I'm afraid - but that's the whole point. Not only is an engrossing story, but it will hopefully provoke the reader to think beyond manichean slogans or (for those of us in related work) our institutional perspectives.
Nern
Rory Stewart's book is a welcome addition to the increasing oeuvre on the American invasion and occupation of Iraq and the efforts by that country of establishing a functioning stable democracy. The most useful aspect of Stewart's work is that it is based on his administrative work in the Shi'ite southern part of Iraq (e.g., assistant governor in Amara in Maysan Province and an administrator later in Nasiriyah in Dhi Qar province). Many of the better works on Iraq have focused more on Baghdad, the Green Zone, and headquarters activities (e.g., The Assassin's Gate; Imperial Life in the Emerald City, Hubris, Blind into Baghdad, Fiasco, and State of Denial). This work shows that the situation was at least as dismal outside of the capital city.

Stewart began as an assistant governor in Maysan province. His tale, wryly told, demonstrates the crazy quilt political context. The Prince of the Marshes (an autocrat from the old Marsh region of southern Iraq), Iranian loyal Shi'ites, and Sadrists (followers of Muqtada al-Sadr) competed with one another for power. In addition, Sheikhs loyal to their own tribes intruded themselves into the process. The end result: A plurality of interests and power centers, sometimes allying with one another and sometimes competing with one another.

Stewart straightforwardly describes his arrival in Maysan province and his efforts to try to develop a functioning provincial governance structure. Simple tasks like selecting police leadership often led to fierce debate across the various factions, with threats routinely made. This, in the context, as Stewart puts it (page 28) with "Iraqis suspicious of our motives, disappointed by our performance, and often contemptuous." Stewart observes that one had to create the image of having power to get things done, so he very soon had to (page 34) "claim authority and bluff people into falling in step." Stewart notes clearly that he was placed into an uncertain position and had to make decisions not fully understanding who the players were and the dynamics among them. But he had to create an air of competence and certainty in order to get things done. It is no coincidence that most of his chapters begin with an appropriate quotation from Machiavelli.

Poignant are his comments about the cluelessness from Coalition leaders in Baghdad and the difficulty of getting support for infrastructure development and the like. Also poignant are his observations about the Shi'ite south becoming more "fundamental" in applying Shi'ite doctrine to everyday life, including killing a female university student because she chose to wear jeans (page 396). The book portrays a long arc into increasing chaos and a strengthening of religious domination in people's everyday lives, as theocracy begin to develop.

An important book, once more illustrating the folly of the American, British, et al. incursion into a country without a full understanding of the situation "on the ground."
generation of new
This is a close, detailed, honest look into one of the most challenging and horrifying situations of the 21st cent: post-Saddam Iraq. While Seyyed Rory will not provide answers to all the ills of this civilization, his insights and documentation are likely among the most careful and thoughtful any non-Arab could put together. He is to be congratulated for his courage and willingness to try, and his recognition of the apparent futility of a Western approach to understanding and "aiding" Iraq.
The Prince of the Marshes: And Other Occupational Hazards Of A Year In Iraq ebook
Author:
Rory Stewart
Category:
Politics & Government
EPUB size:
1420 kb
FB2 size:
1391 kb
DJVU size:
1399 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Penguin Canada; 1St Edition edition (September 4, 2007)
Pages:
416 pages
Rating:
4.2
Other formats:
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