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Awkward: A Detour ebook

by Mary Cappello


by. Cappello, Mary, author.

by. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Mary Cappello is a writer and professor of English and Creative Writing at the University of Rhode Island. Her work has been featured in The New York Times, Salon, The Huffington Post, in guest author blogs for Powell's Books, and on six separate occasions as Notable Essay of the Year in Best American Essays.

Mary Cappello is the author of five books of literary nonfiction, including Awkward: A Detour (a Los Angeles Times best seller); Swallow, based on the Chevalier Jackson Foreign Body Collection in Philadelphia’s Mütter Museum; and, most recently, Life Breaks In: A Mood Almanack. Her work has been featured in The New York Times, Salon. com, The Huffington Post, on NPR, in guest author blogs for Powells Books, and on six separate occasions as Notable Essay of the Year in Best American Essays.

Cappello takes the reader on journeys through Rome, Sicily, London, Moscow, and places in Canada and the United States as she explores the permutations of awkward. She delves deeply into her own past and present and that of her family and the impact of immigration on awkwardness. Cappello carefully explores the awkwardness found in the lives and literary works of Emily Dickinson and Henry James. Mary Cappello's book is poignant,moving, humorous, and heart and eye-opening.

Los Angeles Times Bestseller “Mary Cappello inventive, associative taxonomy of discomfort. No commitment, cancel anytime.

Awkward: A Detour with Celeste Quinn for Illinois Public Radio's Afternoon Magazine, February 27, 2008.

Mary Cappello, "For 'Anyone Interested in Learning What Makes Us Human', Salmagundi, Spring-Summer 2008, 75-96. Mary Cappello, "Ingestion/Alone on Floor with a Pile of Buttons," Cabinet Magazine: A Quarterly of Art and Culture, Special Issue: Forensics, 43 (October 2011): 12-15. Awkward: A Detour with Celeste Quinn for Illinois Public Radio's Afternoon Magazine, February 27, 2008. An illustrated reading, "The Chevalier Jackson Foreign Body Collection and the Art It Has Inspired," at St Bartholomew's Hospital Pathology Museum and Gallery, London, England, June 2012.

Los Angeles Times Bestseller“Mary Cappello[’s] inventive, associative taxonomy of discomfort . . . [is] revelatory indeed.” —MARK DOTY, author of Dog Years: A Memoir and Fire to Fire: New and Selected Poems“A wonderful, multi-layered piece of writing, with all the insight of great cultural criticism and all the emotional pull of memoir. A fascinating book.” —SARAH WATERS, author of The Night Watch and The Little StrangerWithout awkwardness we would not know grace, stability, or balance. Yet no one before Mary Cappello has turned such a penetrating gaze on this misunderstood condition. Fearlessly exploring the ambiguous borders of identity, she mines her own life journeys—from Russia, to Italy, to the far corners of her heart and the depths of a literary or cinematic text—to decipher the powerful messages that awkwardness can transmit.Mary Cappello is the author of four books of literary nonfiction, including Awkward: A Detour, which was a Los Angeles Times bestseller, Called Back: My Reply to Cancer, My Return to Life, which won a ForeWord Reviews Book of the Year Award and an Independent Publishers Prize, and Swallow: Foreign Bodies, Their Ingestion, Inspiration, and the Curious Doctor Who Extracted Them. Professor of English at the University of Rhode Island, she lives in Providence, Rhode Island and Lucerne-in-Maine, Maine.
Cordanara
Dictionary tells us ‘detour’ comes from French; ‘detourner’; to turn away. It describes the word as a roundabout way, a digression. Awkward crunches along through its detours and resurfacings across a rubber-band-tension held between graceful association and an artful composition. The content of Awkward is more grounded in experience and memory than “Swallow” or “ Life Breaks In” and because of this we imagines ourselves to see, more, perhaps, of the master operator behind the persona and her conversational, familiar tone; rich in associations and freshly direct and forthright with insight. That we become aware of the ambiguity of the role the writer, the ambiguity that crunches between the improviser and the composer is perhaps a meta commentary embedded in the work; though the inability of this reader to delineate whether this effect can be said to derive directly from deliberate guidance or from spontaneous and independent thought provoked by accident does indicate positively the richness of this work.

Awkward explores communication through the various ‘removes,’ so speak, which, when observed, do begin to articulate in their contours something incredibly specific and essential; we approach it through the scene of Emily Dickenson granting interviews around the corner to the parlor from her hallway, the dictation given by Henry James to his typist, conversations held between ambassadors and immigrants over time zones and between languages …already I look forward to rereading this slender and rewarding fugue on a future noon.

Recommend for fans of the personal essay, of authors like Roland Barthes, David Lazar, Susan Howe, Montaigne, Wayne Kostenbaum, etc
doesnt Do You
At once easy and hard to put down. A rare gathering of thoughts, answers, and questions.

A favorite passage:

"And then one day it hits you - not all at once but in waves, and who knows why this particular day is to be a wave of succession or what led to it, but it hits you in a suffusing kind of way - of the time things take and of the need to live long enough to receive all the truths you weren't ready to receive, all in good time and at the right time, in readiness or shock, in openness or choosing now, marshaling your resources to throw some habit off its course; of the need to live long enough to face a desire, to make something happen and live with the happening's of the time it takes to learn about all that was good, and all the good you could do, or just to feel the ground beneath you as though it were strewn with bay leaves or egg crates, seashells, or shards; or the sense of a vanishing now at the site of what once was lush undergrowth and concrete, deep pockets of what-had-beens, a corner of the yard where a tap on the arm mingled with the smoky waft of a hot dog plumping on a grill and hydrangea was a face made of lacy stars pulling your own face toward it, or just to know it was there to hide behind, a placemarker at that juncture in the garden, like a doily dropped onto your head at church telling you you were there, you'd known this once, you'd been there before; to live long enough to become fully sentient."
Thoginn
Awkward, A Detour by Mary Cappello is a brilliant, far-ranging meditation on the many aspects of awkwardness. Cappello takes the reader on journeys through Rome, Sicily, London, Moscow, and places in Canada and the United States as she explores the permutations of awkward. She delves deeply into her own past and present and that of her family and the impact of immigration on awkwardness. Cappello carefully explores the awkwardness found in the lives and literary works of Emily Dickinson and Henry James. Mary Cappello's book is poignant,moving, humorous, and heart and eye-opening.
Awkward: A Detour ebook
Author:
Mary Cappello
Category:
Social Sciences
EPUB size:
1291 kb
FB2 size:
1746 kb
DJVU size:
1650 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Bellevue Literary Press; First Edition edition (June 1, 2007)
Pages:
240 pages
Rating:
4.6
Other formats:
rtf lrf lit txt
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