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Old World Daughter, New World Mother: An Education in Love and Freedom ebook

by Maria Laurino


Laurino has a larger point, however, and one with which I strongly agree. The first part of the book describes Laurino' Italian upbringing and her relatives.

Laurino has a larger point, however, and one with which I strongly agree. She sees Italian-American culture as signifying the "caring" point of view that regards inter-dependency and nurturing at the basis of human development. Americans, and particularly our generation of feminists, thought that work should be at the center of women's lives. The second part of the book shows Laurino as a mom. However, it's not a memoir. Laurino doesn't recount events of her life in linear fashion.

Start by marking Old World Daughter, New World Mother: An. .Prizing both individual freedom and an Old World in which the dependent young and old are cherished, Laurino makes clear how much the New World offers and how much it has yet to learn.

Start by marking Old World Daughter, New World Mother: An Education in Love and Freedom as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Prizing both individual freedom and an Old World in which the dependent young and old are cherished, Laurino makes clear how much the New World offers and . Books related to Old World Daughter, New World Mother: An Education in Love and Freedom.

Prizing both individual freedom and an Old World in which the dependent young and old are cherished, Laurino makes clear how much the New World offers and how much it has yet to learn.

Old World tradition sits snugly in my Italian-American family, like a plant in its pot, the tightly contained roots feeding . Maria Laurino’s new memoir, Old World Daughter, New World Mother: An Education in Love and Freedom, will be published in April

Old World tradition sits snugly in my Italian-American family, like a plant in its pot, the tightly contained roots feeding on the soil (and toil) of generations. Maria Laurino’s new memoir, Old World Daughter, New World Mother: An Education in Love and Freedom, will be published in April.

Author: Maria Laurino Prizing both individual freedom and an Old World in which the dependent . Help us to make General-Ebooks better! Genres.

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Principles of computer-assisted instruction systems (Systems engineering of education).

book by Maria Laurino. Principles of computer-assisted instruction systems (Systems engineering of education). Leonard Charles Silvern.

There was a little of this in Old World Daughter, New World Mother but not much

There was a little of this in Old World Daughter, New World Mother but not much. The book discusses family, gender issues, disability, child bearing and rearing. Basically, though, this is a book about feminism.

Daughter, New World Mother : An Education in Love and Freedom.

Old World Daughter, New World Mother : An Education in Love and Freedom. By (author) Maria Laurino. Maria Laurino's book is part memoirs and part analysis of feminism in practice. The book begins with stories of her Italian American grandparents and the lives that they built for themselves in New Jersey. Sharing anecdotes from her mother's childhood of how her maternal grandfather who came to the US at the turn of the century and created his own construction company.

Laurino, Maria, Laurino, Maria - Family, Italian Americans - Biography, Italian American women - Biography, Mothers and daughters - United States . Books for People with Print Disabilities.

Laurino, Maria, Laurino, Maria - Family, Italian Americans - Biography, Italian American women - Biography, Mothers and daughters - United States - Case studies, Children of immigrants - United States - Case studies, Intergenerational relations - United States - Case studies, Italian Americans - Ethnic identity - Case studies, Feminism . Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by on January 6, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

An Education in Love and Freedom. Laurino (Were You Always an Italian?, 2000) examines the internal struggle between her immigrant roots and her yearning for the freedoms of contemporary feminist goals

An Education in Love and Freedom. Laurino (Were You Always an Italian?, 2000) examines the internal struggle between her immigrant roots and her yearning for the freedoms of contemporary feminist goals. The author uses the cultural imprint of her second-generation immigrant family-focusing on the traditional obligations of wife and mother-to set up the personal conflicts she has encountered and continues to process.

A warm, smart, and witty personal investigation of ethnicity and womanhood.

In the second-generation immigrant home where Maria Laurino grew up, “independent” was a dirty word and “sacrifice” was the ideal and reality of motherhood. But out in the world, Mary Tyler Moore was throwing her hat in the air, personifying the excitement and opportunities of the freedom loving American career woman. How, then, to reconcile one’s inner Livia Soprano―the archetypal ethnic mother―with a feminist icon?Combining lived experience with research and reporting on our contemporary work-family dilemmas, Laurino brews an unusual and affirming blend of contemporary and traditional values. No other book has attempted to discuss feminism through the prism of ethnic identity, or to merge the personal and the analytical with such a passionate and intelligent literary voice. Prizing both individual freedom and an Old World in which the dependent young and old are cherished, Laurino makes clear how much the New World offers and how much it has yet to learn.
Welen
My background and experience are very similar to Maria Laurino's, in that I am a woman; all four of my grandparents were born in Italy (Sicily and Naples); I grew up in an Italian-American enclave (Brooklyn, not New Jersey); I went on to attend elite schools and became an "American" professional; my husband is not Italian; and, when our son was a little kid attending summer day-camp at a NYC independent school, I made Italian box lunches for him each day. (My husband laughed out loud when I described Laurino's ricotta crackers, well-remembering the roast chicken legs w/olive oil and oregano, with a side of mozzarella.) Also, like Maria's friends, now that my son is a college student living at home and attending a local college (yes, he didn't leave -- not yet), each time he goes out, I say "Have fun!" when I really want to say "Be careful!" ("Why are you always worrying, Mom?") The fruit does not far fall from the Sicilian tree.

Laurino has a larger point, however, and one with which I strongly agree. She sees Italian-American culture as signifying the "caring" point of view that regards inter-dependency and nurturing at the basis of human development. Americans, and particularly our generation of feminists, thought that work should be at the center of women's lives. Laurino's point, learned as she reconciled her American values with the culture of her grandparents, is that autonomy is not the road to fulfillment. The fruit does not fall far from the tree because the tree and fruit are connected. A forward-thinking feminism, Laurino suggests, would find life-style solutions that would permit women (and men) to work while at the same time recognizing that family, and personal connections, are essential for the health of all.

I have often said that the moment that I held my son in my arms, I was magically transformed into my mother. That's because, at some level, I recognized that her love and support, and the values of my childhood, had made everything that I'd achieved possible. Laurino has transformed this recognition into a program for change. Brava -- bravissima! -- from one Italian-American mamma to another.
Marg
This book is more about feminism than the tensions between old world customs and acculturation.
Tygrafym
At first I had trouble figuring out what this book was about. The title suggested a memoir about a mother-daughter relationship. The first part of the book describes Laurino' Italian upbringing and her relatives. She's the daughter. The second part of the book shows Laurino as a mom. However, it's not a memoir. Laurino doesn't recount events of her life in linear fashion. She includes opinions and interviews relating to feminism.

The theme of Laurino's book seems to relate to the contradictions of the promise of feminism. For instance, Jeane Kirkpatrick - Laurino's college mentor - becomes a UN Ambassador in the Reagan administration. Though she's the first female to hold an international position in the president's cabinet, Kirkpatrick was not recognized as a feminist.

Laurino defends the speech New York Times writer Joyce Purnick made at the Barnard College commencement. Purnick acknowledged that she could not have achieved her successes if she had a child. According to Laurino, the Barnard women were furious.

Laurino points out that Purnick was telling the truth, but she goes on to blame the United States failure to accommodate female biology. Other countries, she points out, give new mothers considerably more time off.

She describes a particularly horrific experience, involving women doctors and a midwife. When she started crying after being advised to have no more children, the female doctor directs her to, "Emote later."

"Emote later?" Laurino asks. "For this I had chosen a feminist practice and its band of caring midwives?" I don't understand why Laurino didn't write a complaint to the head of her managed care group, the hospital board and, if necessary, the state medical boards. If more people would speak up, these things would happen less often.

Laurino has been active in government. Mayor Dinkins officiated at her wedding. So perhaps it's natural for her to argue for legislation to address these challenges. On the other hand, not all women (or all feminists) are married with children.

On pages 211-212, Laurino describes another woman making another unfortunate speech, also at Barnard (which happens to be my own alma mater. This woman, an unnamed dancer, says she was advised to get a husband so she could have health insurance. Laurino says the audience was furious, but says dependency can be justified. Would it be better for this woman to work at a job she detests (because dancers don't earn much money instead of accepting support from a husband?

But here's where Laurino falters. It's not about dependency: it's about the opportunity to achieve and be single. After all, a man who wanted to take a series of low-level jobs would face the same problem: get married or take a part-time job to get insurance.

Ultimately I would have liked to see a more direct focus: more direct discussion of the ironies of contemporary women's experience and more specific episodes like the health care story. The old vs new world contrast wasn't especially strong and ultimately was less interesting than some of the other issues Laurino raises.
Old World Daughter, New World Mother: An Education in Love and Freedom ebook
Author:
Maria Laurino
Category:
Social Sciences
EPUB size:
1855 kb
FB2 size:
1366 kb
DJVU size:
1324 kb
Language:
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company (April 13, 2009)
Pages:
224 pages
Rating:
4.8
Other formats:
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