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Giving Away Simone ebook

by Jan L. Waldron


Waldron, Jan . Birthmothers - United States - Biography. Adoption - United States - Psychological aspects. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on August 17, 2012.

Jan Waldron's baby, Simone, was actually the fifth generation of women abandoned by their mothers. Determined to fight "an undertow of conditioned exiting, an affliction of easy farewells," Jan reunited with her daughter, now renamed Rebecca, when Rebecca was eleven.

Jan's baby, Simone, was the fifth generation of women in her family to be abandoned by their mothers. Determined to fight this "undertow of conditioned exiting, an affliction of easy farewell," Jan reunited with her daughter, now renamed Rebecca, when Rebecca was eleven.

Waldron learned to forgive herself for giving up her daughter while . A Memoir of Daughters, Mothers, Adoption, and Reunion.

Waldron learned to forgive herself for giving up her daughter while establishing bounds for the complex relationship between them. were trying to come up with answers, but we barely knew the question, so we fudged, fibbed, and tested,'' writes Waldron. Still, Waldron's painful honesty and absorbing insights make this book valuable reading.

Jan’s baby, Simone, was the fifth generation of women in her family to be abandoned by their mothers. They spent the next thirteen years trying to come to terms with each other and figure out what kind of roles they were to play in each others’ lives.

GIVING AWAY SIMONE is a story of five generations of women who chose to leave their children, all intertwined across the decades by memories and inherited pain. Drawing upon an instinctual strength, Waldron is determined to end the cycle of leaving

GIVING AWAY SIMONE is a story of five generations of women who chose to leave their children, all intertwined across the decades by memories and inherited pain. Drawing upon an instinctual strength, Waldron is determined to end the cycle of leaving. The last page is simply the end of the book. This story of love between a mother and daughter, and the redefinition of family will clearly continue beyond their lifetimes. Jan Waldron writes from an urgent, deep conviction about the inability of women to give up their children without vast repercussions.

Giving Away Simone: A Memoir" by Jan Waldron, published by Times Books. Books mentioned on Soundings: March 26, 1995: "Christine Stead: A Biography" by Hazel Rowley, published by H. Holt and "Simone de Beauvoir: The Making of an Intellectual Woman" by Toril Moi, published by Blackwell.

30 September ·. Last laundry .27 September ·. O/c. Jan L Waldron. 16 August ·. glass vases o/c 16x20. Jan L Waldron updated their phone number. Call Now. 19 April ·. night trees. 27 March ·. 6:30 pm 1961.

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Giving Away Simone by Waldron, Jan L. Giving It All Up: Walk Away and Embrace Your Passion Today! by Smalley Ph. S.

Giving Away Simone is Jan Waldron's account of her compelling, turbulent, and maddeningly original relationship with the daughter she gave away. Jan's baby, Simone, was the fifth generation of women in her family to be abandoned by their mothers. Determined to fight this "undertow of conditioned exiting, an affliction of easy farewell," Jan reunited with her daughter, now renamed Rebecca, when Rebecca was eleven. They spent the next thirteen years trying to come to terms with each other and figure out what kind of roles they were to play in each others' lives.For birthmothers, there are no simple equations of loss and gain. Each adoption is its own unique universe of complexities and ambiguities. But often the most personal is also the most universal, and there are truths to be found in every story. This beautifully rendered, intensely personal memoir gives essential shading to choices usually reduced to black and white. Waldron does not dispense advice; she probes the emotional fallout, on both sides of adoption, an area in which sedated platitudes have presided for far too long. "From the Trade Paperback edition.
allegro
This book is not just for adoptive parents or children. It is a compassionate read for all mothers and daughters who struggle with female bonding and communication or lack of.

It speaks to the generations and patterns that we fail to identify and make peace with in our lives, it wraps itself around all the missing links in our questions of ancestry.

I enjoyed it very much, and would highly recommend it for a good read, and I admire the writer for her truth, integrity and honesty. And for Simone for her tenacity to heal and move on, and the struggle that perpetuates itself in all of that.
roternow
Jan L Waldron's first book is her true story of giving up her first child for adoption. Her family history - 5 generations of women giving up or abandoning children - is incredible. She bares her soul in the telling of reconnecting with her birthdaughter. It is full of heartbreak and love as birthmother and daughter try to learn the whys and wherefores of the separation and the coming together. Highly recommend!
Ndav
It seemed too negative to me-
Fordg
As an adoptive mother, I was forced to confront some unpleasant truths about myself by reading this powerful, disturbing book. I was initially appalled by Ms. Waldron's response to her daughter's return into her life. It astounded me that she would think it appropriate to try to parent a child who already had adoptive parents (with whom she was very happy), let alone to criticize the parenting her child had received. Gradually I realized that this attitude was not a "right" that Ms. Waldron was asserting ('she's my child too!') but a responsibility that she would much rather have abdicated, but could not in good conscience avoid. To establish an honest bond with Rebecca (the "Simone" of the title), her birthmother had to treat her as her child, not as a privileged guest or--worse (the trap I would fall into, I suspect!)--a victim to whom she owed some sort of reparations. This is an insight for which I am grateful, and one which all adoptive parents should have.
I was bothered throughout the book by the lack of attention given to the birthfather. I understand if Ms. Waldron feels she cannot tell his story, or if she doesn't know his story, but I really wanted to know what Rebecca thought about his continuing absence, particularly since he was black and she, as a biracial woman, is perceived as black. Waldron criticizes her daugheter's upbringing in an all-white neighborhood where she was allowed to be "exotic"--never good preparation for the reality of being black in America--but never discusses any alternative. Since she saw the child regularly from the age of 11, I just wondered if she had tried to introduce her to a wider or more diverse group of friends.
There is no doubt that "Giving Away Simone" is required reading for everyone in the adoption triangle. I hope that more birthparents come forward and tell their stories; as adoptive parents, we need to be reminded of their perspective and helped along in the wonderful, daunting task of raising adopted children.
Burirus
Reading Waldron's touching memoir, Giving Away Simone, one will find not a typical story of teen pregnancy and adoption, but the story of a woman who unravels a legacy of abandonment and subsequent emotional distress. Her daughter Simone (renamed Rebecca by her adoptive parents), she learns later in life, is the fifth generation of a line of women who have abandoned their daughters. Knowing this gives a sharper perspective to Waldron's story as she relates her own sanitary childhood and attempts to explain why abandonment happens.
When Waldron writes of her parents, it is sad to know that such a family existed without hugs and kisses and little things that make a family whole. Most of Waldron's warmth is channeled instead to anecdotes of her domineering grandmother Altie, a church matron who spent her own years of adoptive motherhood both impressed with and perplexed by Sara's peculiar nature.
The second stage of Giving Away Simone involves Jan's reunion with Rebecca eleven years after mother gave daughter away. Through touching narrative and tense, dramatic correspondence, Waldron relates her "reintegration" into Rebecca's life and her experiences in establishing a relationship with Rebecca without taking anything away from the adoptive family (Waldron calls herself the "birthmother," which, she relates, does not always fulfill the requirements of a true mother.) As expected, Waldron is sympathetic to those who have given up children for adoption, and through baring her own soul she proves that while there may be regrets, there need not be blame when the welfare of a child is at stake.
Giving Away Simone ebook
Author:
Jan L. Waldron
Category:
Social Sciences
EPUB size:
1644 kb
FB2 size:
1600 kb
DJVU size:
1387 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Crown; 1st ed edition (January 24, 1995)
Pages:
236 pages
Rating:
4.9
Other formats:
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