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Gang Nation: Delinquent Citizens In Puerto Rican, Chicano, And Chicana Narratives ebook

by Monica Brown


Gang Nation is an exemplary counter hegemonic text that unveils how the intersected force of race, class and gender oppression (as a neocolonial matrix) drive the racialized panoptic and carceral regimes of the United States

Gang Nation is an exemplary counter hegemonic text that unveils how the intersected force of race, class and gender oppression (as a neocolonial matrix) drive the racialized panoptic and carceral regimes of the United States. Given how Latina/o youth like African American are demonized and then converted through the "justice" system into abjects and throwaways this study reveals how poor Latina/o youth negotiate institutional violence on a daily basis for survival.

In Gang Nation, Monica Brown offers a sophisticated analysis of these narratives produced by former gang members and by "outside" observers writing within the Latino community.

Home Browse Books Book details, Gang Nation: Delinquent Citizens in Puerto. In Gang Nation, Monica Brown explores how Latino gang culture mirrors the most destructive aspects of the American Dream through a look at novels and memoirs. Gang Nation: Delinquent Citizens in Puerto Rican, Chicano, and Chicana Narratives.

Chicano, or Chicana, is a chosen identity of some Mexican Americans in the United States

Chicano, or Chicana, is a chosen identity of some Mexican Americans in the United States. Chicano or Xicano are sometimes used interchangeably with Mexican-American, and both names exist as chosen identities within the Mexican-American community in the United States

book by Monica Brown. There's a place for us, Somewhere a place for u. .

book by Monica Brown. There's a place for us, Somewhere a place for us. Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover.

Ground-breaking works by Chicano authors such as Pocho by Jose Antonio Villarreal, Y no se lo tragó la tierra by Tomás Rivera, and by Puerto Rican authors such as Down.

This ambivalent relation with the Barrio is especially relevant in most narratives by Chicano and Puerto Rican authors who attempt to represent barrio life in all its complexity as a metaphor of Latino identity in constant movement.

In both sets of cross-sectional data, the fitting of linear structural models shows gang involvement to be an effective post hoc estimator of delinquency for these youth, whereas delinquency is not an effective estimator of gang involvement. What type of file do you want?

She also writes and publishes scholarly work with a Latino/a focus, including Gang Nation: Delinquent Citizenship in Puerto Rican and Chicano and Chicana Literature; and numerous scholarly articles and chapters on Latino/a literature and cultural studies. She is a recipient of the prestigious Rockefeller Fellowship on Chicano Cultural Literacies from the Center for Chicano Studies at the University of California. She lives with her husband and two daughters in Flagstaff, Arizona.

Gang nation : delinquent citizens in Puerto Rican, Chicano, and Chicana narratives. United Nations country profile. Genetic Make-up of Puerto Ricans. 1930s Sterilization of One Third of Puerto Rican Women by the Chicago Women's Liberation Union. University of Minnesota Press. php?title Demographics of Puerto Rico&oldid 903774730".

Monica Brown, Gang Nation: Delinquent Citizens in Puerto Rican, Chicano, and Chicana Narratives (Minneapolis: University of Minneapolis Press, 2002), xv. oogle Scholar. 8. Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Between Men: English Literature and Male Homosocial Desire (New York: Columbia University Press, 1985).

"There's a place for us / Somewhere a place for us . . ." With the emergence of a rich body of literature chronicling the experiences of Latino and Latina gang members, popular understanding of this outlaw culture has advanced far beyond West Side Story. However, the diverse works discussed in this important book-ranging from the breakthrough 1967 memoir Down These Mean Streets and the crime novel Carlito's Way to the play Zoot Suit and the World War II-era historical novel Don't Spit on My Corner, to more recent works such as Always Running/La Vida Loca: Gang Days in L.A. and Chicana gang narratives like Locas and Two Badges-all share with the award-winning musical a crucial discourse on nationality, citizenship, and belonging.

In Gang Nation, Monica Brown offers a sophisticated analysis of these narratives produced by former gang members and by "outside" observers writing within the Latino community. She examines the ubiquity of language and behavior within this literature that reveal the frustrated longings within gangs for greater participation in America's national culture and the desire of members to craft an alternative environment in which they are welcome. Through literature and memoirs written from within the culture, Brown illustrates how these youth mimic the rhetoric and rituals of American nationalism's most destructive aspects-intense territoriality, justification of violence, and cultural chauvinism-to assert their citizenship in an alternative nation.

Before now, studies of gang culture have centered on either the choices of individual members or the social forces that inspire their unfocused rage. But through Latino and Chicano gang literature, Brown provides a more nuanced portrait of that culture, one that raises broader concerns about dominant nationalism, civil rights, the criminalization of urban youth of color, and the often unfulfilled sense of communal identity and acceptance among American youth.

Monica Brown is an assistant professor of English at Northern Arizona University.

jorik
Gang Nation is an exemplary counter hegemonic text that unveils how the intersected force of race, class and gender oppression (as a neocolonial matrix) drive the racialized panoptic and carceral regimes of the United States. Given how Latina/o youth like African American are demonized and then converted through the "justice" system into abjects and throwaways this study reveals how poor Latina/o youth negotiate institutional violence on a daily basis for survival. Through Browns illumination of the complexity, eloquence and poltics of self-representation in Latina/o gang narratives and autobiographies, we get a picture of the results of extreme poverty, urban decay, trauma, and neocolonial racism on these kid's struggle for empowerment and survival. Part of what is also crucial about Browns study is the willingness to critique and condemn the "normalization" of sexual violence against women and girls "in the hood" and shows how patriarchal norms of the dominant culture are re-articulated in non-dominant communities. In this regard the read of Luis Rodriguez's Always Running and the chapter "American She" which examines the fetishization of Chicanas in gang in the media is useful and politically cogent. Furthermore as a text for classroom use, it is surprisingly jargon free and at the same time a theoretically nuanced and complex read of the historic, insitutional and everyday forces that criminalize and violate Latina/o youth. A must read.....!!!.
Voodoozragore
Brown's book undertakes an important analysis of gang literature and representation, but the use of the concept "gang nation" is, in my opinion, questionable. For a more grounded account of gangs, I recommend that people read this book along side Miranda's Homegirls in the Public Sphere, Kontos' Gangs and Society, and work by Vigil and Moore. Good work overall!
Gang Nation: Delinquent Citizens In Puerto Rican, Chicano, And Chicana Narratives ebook
Author:
Monica Brown
Category:
Social Sciences
EPUB size:
1785 kb
FB2 size:
1315 kb
DJVU size:
1821 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Univ Of Minnesota Press; First edition edition (May 14, 2002)
Pages:
256 pages
Rating:
4.1
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