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Black American Students in An Affluent Suburb: A Study of Academic Disengagement (Sociocultural, Political, and Historical Studies in Education) ebook

by With the Assist Davis,John U. Ogbu


Professor Ogbu's latest conclusions are highlighted in a study of blacks in Shaker Heights, Ohio, an affluent Cleveland suburb whose school district is equally divided between blacks and whites

No matter how you reform schools, it's not going to solve the problem," he said in an interview. Professor Ogbu's latest conclusions are highlighted in a study of blacks in Shaker Heights, Ohio, an affluent Cleveland suburb whose school district is equally divided between blacks and whites. As in many racially integrated school districts, the black students have lagged behind whites in grade-point averages, test scores and placement in high-level classes.

John U. Ogbu, With the Assist Davis. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. The Handbook of Conflict Resolution: Theory and Practice. Morton Deutsch, Peter T. Coleman, Eric C. Marcus.

John Ogbu has studied minority education from a comparative perspective for over 30 years. The study reported in this book-jointly sponsored by the community and the school district in Shaker Heights. John Ogbu, like Bill Cosby, Larry Elder and Thomas Sowell, has an intellectual stature that demands he be taken seriously and an immunity to charges of racism. Another author would not have gotten away with the phrase "academic disengagement. Yet at the end of the book one realizes how appropriate that two-word appraisal is. It is refreshing as well to read an author with an anthropologist's orientation. The study reported in this book-jointly sponsored by the community and the school district in Shaker Heights, Ohio-focuses on the academic performance of Black American students. Download (pdf, . 1 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format. Furthermore, both middle-class Black students in suburban school districts, as well as poor Black students in inner-city schools are not doing well. Ogbu's analysis draws on data from observations, formal and informal interviews, and statistical and other data. He offers strong empirical evidence to support the cross-class existence of the problem. John Ogbu has studied minority education from a comparative perspective for over 30 years. Not only do these students perform less well than White students at every social class level, but also less well than immigrant minority students, including Black immigrant students

Ogbu discovered from student interviews that Black students considered Shaker Heights schools to be exceptionally good.

Other studies have drawn upon cultural–ecological theory (CE theory), developed by. .

John Ogbu has studied minority education from a comparative perspective for over 30 years. The study reported in this book--jointly sponsored by the community and the school district in Shaker Heights, Ohio--focuses on the academic performance of Black American students. Not only do these students perform less well than White students at every social class level, but also less well than immigrant minority students, including Black immigrant students. Furthermore, both middle-class Black students in suburban school districts, as well as poor Black students in inner-city schools are not doing well. Ogbu's analysis draws on data from observations, formal and informal interviews, and statistical and other data. He offers strong empirical evidence to support the cross-class existence of the problem. The book is organized in four parts: *Part I provides a description of the twin problems the study addresses--the gap between Black and White students in school performance and the low academic engagement of Black students; a review of conventional explanations; an alternative perspective; and the framework for the study. *Part II is an analysis of societal and school factors contributing to the problem, including race relations, Pygmalion or internalized White beliefs and expectations, levelling or tracking, the roles of teachers, counselors, and discipline. *Community factors--the focus of this study--are discussed in Part III. These include the educational impact of opportunity structure, collective identity, cultural and language or dialect frame of reference in schooling, peer pressures, and the role of the family. This research focus does not mean exonerating the system and blaming minorities, nor does it mean neglecting school and society factors. Rather, Ogbu argues, the role of community forces should be incorporated into the discussion of the academic achievement gap by researchers, theoreticians, policymakers, educators, and minorities themselves who genuinely want to improve the academic achievement of African American children and other minorities. *In Part IV, Ogbu presents a summary of the study's findings on community forces and offers recommendations--some of which are for the school system and some for the Black community. Black American Students in an Affluent Suburb: A Study of Academic Disengagement is an important book for a wide range of researchers, professionals, and students, particularly in the areas of Black education, minority education, comparative and international education, sociology of education, educational anthropology, educational policy, teacher education, and applied anthropology.
*Nameless*
The late Dr. Ogbu did not make excuses for the lack of Black academic progress among our youth. He proved, by research, investigation, and interviews that the true success of any people starts in the home and spreads to the school. One can come from a good home, and NOT be a good student. There were a lot of African Americans who did not like the truth of the Ogbu study, but there are a LOT more who say that Dr. Ogbu was right on target...and the puppets and pretenders need to see his work as ground breaking and generation following, even in our high-tech age.
Zbr
This book manages to be comprehensible to a general reader while adhering to the rigorous demands of social science, that is to say, the formal structure of presenting and defending hypotheses and footnoting them endlessly. The book could have been better edited; too many errors of grammar, usage and even spelling slipped through.

I tend to trust Black commentators on American race issues. John Ogbu, like Bill Cosby, Larry Elder and Thomas Sowell, has an intellectual stature that demands he be taken seriously and an immunity to charges of racism. Another author would not have gotten away with the phrase "academic disengagement." Yet at the end of the book one realizes how appropriate that two-word appraisal is.

It is refreshing as well to read an author with an anthropologist's orientation. Ogbu's exhaustive study gave him an opportunity to repeat and reinforce earlier findings in Stockton and Oakland, California, and elsewhere and tailor findings to the Shaker Heights situation.

Blacks are, like American Indians, non-voluntary minorities. To say the least, most of their ancestors did not exactly enlist for service in the United States. The fewer and more recent voluntary black immigrants such as Colin Powell are interesting in two respects. First, their children do better in school than native born blacks. Secondly, however, subsequent generations born in the United States tend to adopt the (dysfunctional) attitudes of the native-born.

Ogbu's contention is that Blacks' profound distrust of the establishment and their conviction that they will not get a fair shake predisposes them not to give their full effort to schoolwork. Their defeatist attitudes start to emerge in the later primary years and are highly apparent by high school. Among the contributing factors are inappropriate role models -- sports and entertainment figures and various types of outlaws -- and a lack of parental involvement in the children's schooling. He describes a black expectation of a "beer mug" approach to teaching The teacher pours knowledge into the passive student. In this model the parents' job is to get the child to school, and the blame is on the teachers if he doesn't learn. He says also that parents are more attuned to whether teachers "care" than whether they are effective teachers.

He surveys a range of attempts to find solutions in changes to the school model: vouchers, charters, merit pay and so on. None have been, by his assessment, markedly successful. His recommendation is to change the culture of the learners themselves. Reinforce positive study habits, recognize achievement, and arm the students against the inevitable attempts of their peers to drag them into mediocrity.

I amend this review to refer the reader to "Crash Course" by Chris Whittle (and my review of the same). Whittle manages charter schools for underprivileged children in Baltimore, Washington, Philadelphia and elsewhere, and has quite a bit of success. He employs some of the ideas Ogbu advocates.

Ogbu did a workmanlike job of taking into consideration such factors as parental education, income and peer group values in comparing black and white students. He did so by drawing on his wealth of experience with Black students throughout America. Since his distinction between voluntary and involuntary immigrant status is central to his argument, it would have been useful to attempt to sort out those aspects of the Black educational experience that are unique within the American environment from those that characterize Black students in other national settings. The Nigerian-born Mr. Ogbu would have been uniquely well positioned to do so.
Naa
Prof. Ogbu has provided an excellent and very convincing (to me, at least) demonstration of black student disengagement as a major driver in causing the black/white education gap. It is unfortunate that his death prevents him from providing us with insights as to how our society might more effectively address the problem of disengagement. In one respect the Shaker Heights community he studied is fortunate in that it is not impacted by some of the other major drivers (poverty, teachers' expectations, disfunctional families, etc.) that tend to widen and complicate the black/white education gap in other communities that are not so high on the socio-economic scale.
Granigrinn
After hearing about Ogbu's work, I added this book to a bibliography of items I would read over the next year. This ethnographic study takes place in a highly rated district in Ohio. Ogbu enters into the study hoping to help develop an understanding of many Black students' academic disengagement. Through his stay in the community, over 100 classroom observations, interviews of a variety of stakeholders, attendance at various community meetings and more, Ogbu dissects the information to determine the factors contributing to academic achievement. While it was worthwhile to read the ethnographic study, I did not feel that the conclusions/recommendation offered anything of real substance for the community. I would love to know more from the community/district's perspective about any sustainable changes that took place as a result of Ogbu's work in their community. I am not sure anything of too much value was presented by Ogbu.
Riavay
I found this book to be truly insightful. The author provided interesting information that was gained through observation, focus groups, and one-on-one interviews of just how disengaged affluent African American high school students are from the educational process. The author underscores the fact that the challenges facing African American and educations goes beyond economics.
Amhirishes
This book explained things I always just took at face value.
Xor
This study introduced the term "acting white" to academic readers and effectively illustrates the cultural resistance of middle class teens to the conventional values of white institutions.
Any open minded person that reads this book will quickly discover the obvious; The Black community in Shaker Heights, Ohio is in deep need of Dr. Phil McGraw's "Self Matters." Ogbu produces page upon page of community respondents culturally brainwashed to focus their intellect on a history they have not lived, and an available future that they cannot fathom. Ogbu's tone is harsh. His main argument: The Black community's cultural beliefs and practices are not conducive to success in academics. This is where the controversy lies. Because the book doesn't blame the testing gap on White racism, his analysis must be wrong. Simply read what students themselves are saying and draw your own conclusions.
Black American Students in An Affluent Suburb: A Study of Academic Disengagement (Sociocultural, Political, and Historical Studies in Education) ebook
Author:
With the Assist Davis,John U. Ogbu
Category:
Social Sciences
EPUB size:
1842 kb
FB2 size:
1484 kb
DJVU size:
1953 kb
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Publisher:
Routledge; 1 edition (January 3, 2003)
Pages:
344 pages
Rating:
4.2
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