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Baghdad Sketches: Journeys through Iraq (Tauris Parke Paperbacks) ebook

by Freya Stark


Baghdad Sketches: Journey. has been added to your Basket. This is the first book that Freya Stark had published. It is made up of short pieces written for newspapers, chiefly the 'Baghdad Times'. describing travels in the country of Iraq in 1931. Freya Stark also spent time in Kuwait.

Baghdad Sketches: Journey. The landscapes, people and buildings are fluently described, and the historical and religious background sketched in. As a Western visitor, and also a woman,although an Arabic speaker, she had to be very careful where she went, and was fortunate to have some local contacts who were able to assist her.

Items related to Baghdad Sketches: Journeys Through Iraq (Tauris . The Freya Stark Collection Freya Stark first journeyed to Iraq in 1927.

Items related to Baghdad Sketches: Journeys Through Iraq (Tauris Parke. Freya Stark Baghdad Sketches: Journeys Through Iraq (Tauris Parke Paperbacks). ISBN 13: 9781848856554. Freya Stark first journeyed to Iraq in 1927. Seven years after the establishment of the British Mandate, the modern state was in its infancy and worlds apart from the country it has since become. During her many years in Iraq, Stark was witness to the rise and fall of the British involvement in the country as well as the early years of independence.

Baghdad Sketches book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Baghdad Sketches: Journeys through Iraq as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Freya Stark first journeyed to Iraq in 1927. During her many years in Iraq, Freya Stark was witness to the rise and fall of the British involvement in the country as well as the early years of independence

The Freya Stark Collection Freya Stark first journeyed to Iraq in 1927. Venturing out of Baghdad, she travelled to Mosul, Nineveh, Tikrit and Najaf, where she perceptively describes the millennia-old tensions between Sunni and Shi'a, time not having dissipated their hatred

The Freya Stark Collection Freya Stark first journeyed to Iraq in 1927. Venturing out of Baghdad, she travelled to Mosul, Nineveh, Tikrit and Najaf, where she perceptively describes the millennia-old tensions between Sunni and Shi'a, time not having dissipated their hatred. In the 1940s she returned again, this time travelling south, to the Marsh Arabs, whose way of life has now all but disappeared; north into Kurdistan and later, Kuwait, in the days before the oil boom.

The Freya Stark Collection Freya Stark first journeyed to Iraq in 1927.

Discover Freya Stark famous and rare quotes. Baghdad Sketches: Journeys Through Iraq, . 9, Tauris Parke Paperbacks. I have long come to believe that, more than any other destruction, our word-recklessness is endangering the future of us all.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Marlboro Travel: Baghdad Sketches by Freya Stark . She spent most of the next four years in Iraq and Persia, visiting ancient and medieval sites, and traveling alone through some of the wilder corners of the region.

She spent most of the next four years in Iraq and Persia, visiting ancient and medieval sites, and traveling alone through some of the wilder corners of the region.

Baghdad Sketches: Journeys Through Iraq, . 1, Tauris Parke Paperbacks. A Winter in Arabia: A Journey Through Yemen, . 21, The Overlook Press. Knowing, Atmosphere, Blank Mind. House, Animal, Silly.

Freya Stark first journeyed to Iraq in 1927. Seven years after the establishment of the British Mandate, the modern state was in its infancy and worlds apart from the country it has since become. During her many years in Iraq, Stark was witness to the rise and fall of the British involvement in the country as well as the early years of independence. Typicallyâ?and controversiallyâ?she chose to live outside the close-knit western expatriate scene and immersed herself in the way of life of ordinary Iraqisâ?living in the â?nativeâ? quarter of the city and spending time with its tribal sheikhs and leaders. Venturing out of Baghdad, she traveled to Mosul, Nineveh, Tikrit and Najaf, where she perceptively describes the millennia-old tensions between Sunni and Shi'a. In the 1940s she returned again, this time traveling south, to the Marsh Arabs, whose way of life has now all but disappeared; north into Kurdistan and later, Kuwait, in the days before the oil boom.

Gardataur
This is a short little book, of Stark's travels through modern-day Iraq, but interesting now because many of the places she traveled to freely in the 30's are in the news today. Stark was one of the many "Arabists" who traveled the Middle East freely and actually lived in a Baghdad slum for many months just to get closer to the natives. It is more of a travelogue than a political treatise, but her observations and conversations with the old order of the Bedouins and others are interesting. She notes the graveyards of English soldiers who were killed during the days when the newly formed Iraq was a British protectorate after the breakup of the Ottoman Empire after WWI and concludes that these were lives wasted on a very backward country, without understanding the reason this country was important was not for its medievel culture but its oil. Her observations would be considered substantially "politically incorrect" today, but her access to some of the tribal leaders resulted in very interesting conversations, not the least of which was her meeting with Shaikh 'Abdu'l-Husain and his warnings about the developing events in Palestine, before the creation of Israel, but after the Balfour declaration.
Her description of the intensity of the hatred between the Shiia and the Sunni, the beheading of Ali 1250 years before her visit to Kerbela and Najaf where it is remembered as if it occurred the day before is most insightful. Her declaration of these towns living on their memory of hate where time stopped, is really very good writing. Her observations of the slaves in Kuwait as if it was nothing out of the ordinary, which it wasn't considering the slavery was not officially abolished in Saudi Arabia until the 1960's is also very good history in itself.
Of course such a book could not be written today for many reasons, but if you want to get a better flavor for today's issues in the Middle East, you could do worse than invest a couple hours in this book, since nothing has really changed, only the reporting has become remote and detached and politically correct, which gives those of us living today a very unbalanced picture of the forces still at work in Iraq 70 years after she wrote about them.
Shezokha
As a foreigner who came long ago to live in Mexico I can sympathize with Stark's observations. I have written many that are parallel and wish I still had that freshness and sense of wonder, but if you stay long enough you blend in, you become yourself a subject for a sketch. Her sketches tell tales, draw pictures, highlight scenes, that a native is never aware of. It's his daily life, he never stops to think about it, sees nothing odd, certainly nothing "exotic" in what transpires around him. Freya, furthermore, has a gift for words and her descriptions are often breathtaking. Magic is always there, you just have to have a privileged eye, in order to single it out.
Anyshoun
this was a great read - witty & fun. really enjoyed reading it. will buy other freya stark collection books. recommend to anyone - especially travelers or people looking for 1st hand accounts of the Middle East by westerners.
Hellblade
Great book to take on holidays while traveling. A few great message by a woman who was interesting and lived her life as a trailblazer. She would have been a rare role model in her day.
Skunk Black
These are great short stories from a daring female explorer and writer, Freya Stark, who traveled throughout old world Arabia and Persia - an anomoly of her time. However this particular title is of short stories from her stay in Bagdhad - a world away from today's issues. I did not like the introduction and found the writer sarcastic in tone, and did not understand what her goal was. I would highly recommend this book for it's very pleasant read - the romantic and concise details of days gone by make for an enjoying reading session. But do skip the introduction!
Anen
The book offers a unique protrayal of Baghdad in the 1930s through the eyes of a young British woman who lived amongst its slum dwellers on less than £1 a day. Freya Stark's day-to-day encounters with people in the slums juxtaposed with Iraqi intelligentsia and the detached British elite who ruled Iraq through the mandate, offers a valuable insight into how short-sighted and flawed was the British imperial outlook on nation-building in Mesopotamia.
Fani
This book tells you something about the Baghdad of the half of the 20th Century, before the western powers first and then the Muslim fundamentalists mucked things up. But it tells you more about the period when a few women dared to travel to exotic places and who created books and travel sketches about them. Interesting also is that Freya wrote letters of support for the Anna of "Anna and the King of Siam". But that's another story.
A very worthwhile glimpse into mid-20th Century Baghdad - this series of essays paints intriguing pictures of the streets, the culture and the decline of Colonialism in a country that used to be our Middle-Eastern ally. Much better than her later books.
Baghdad Sketches: Journeys through Iraq (Tauris Parke Paperbacks) ebook
Author:
Freya Stark
Category:
Writing Research & Publishing Guides
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1394 kb
FB2 size:
1107 kb
DJVU size:
1902 kb
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Publisher:
Tauris Parke Paperbacks; Reprint edition (May 10, 2011)
Pages:
184 pages
Rating:
4.2
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