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Negotiating a Book Contract: A Guide for Authors, Agents and Lawyers ebook

by Mark Levine


Mark Levine is a lawyer with many years of experience representing authors, small publishers and book packagers in. .Negotiating a Book Contract is the best book I've read on the subject

Mark Levine is a lawyer with many years of experience representing authors, small publishers and book packagers in book contract negotiations, and all that experience definitely shows in this book. But what is even more evident is that he's a fantastic writer and teacher. Negotiating a Book Contract is the best book I've read on the subject. Writer Mark Levine provides a comprehensive, clear and concise overview of every element found in a publishing contract, including royalties, advances, subsidiary rights, manuscript delivery obligations, termination rights, and options.

Negotiating a Book Contract book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Negotiating a Book Contract: A Guide for Authors, Agents and Lawyers as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Levine, Mark L. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by ttscribe14. hongkong on November 8, 2018.

Publishing contracts can readily be negotiated that balance the rights and interests-and meet the needs-of author and . the many points that are either.

Publishing contracts can readily be negotiated that balance the rights and interests-and meet the needs-of author and publisher alike the many points that are either omitted entirely from some publishers' contracts or are written primarily from the publishers' perspective. Authors should be aware that virtually every publisher regularly revises its standard contract in many areas when asked to do so by authors and their representatives

Negotiating a Book Contract is organized according to the typical sequence of.

Negotiating a Book Contract is organized according to the typical sequence of clauses in publishers’ book contracts. Book contracts are written by publishers’ lawyers looking out for the publishers’ interests, not yours. Negotiating a Book Contract tells authors, and their agents and lawyers, about the many points omitted entirely from many publishers’ book contracts or - if there - are written mainly from the publishers’ perspective. End up with a contract that’s fair to you as well as your publisher. This book shows you how.

How to Negotiate a Contract : How Contract Negotiations Work - Продолжительность: 5:32 . Secrets Behind The Book Publishing World - Продолжительность: 1:34:50 Strand Book Store Recommended for you. 1:34:50. Programming in Visual Basic.

How to Negotiate a Contract : How Contract Negotiations Work - Продолжительность: 5:32 expertvillage Recommended for you. 5:32.

Negotiating a Book Contract: A Guide for Authors, Agents and Lawyers is Levine’s third book

Negotiating a Book Contract: A Guide for Authors, Agents and Lawyers is Levine’s third book. Levine is a former vice president and member of the Board of Directors of the American Book Producers Association.

Most publishing contracts are written by publishers lawyers properly looking out for . This book is indispensable for any author interested in getting a fair deal.

Most publishing contracts are written by publishers lawyers properly looking out for the publishers interests. I cannot recommend it highly enough. Mark is very attuned to the industry and his advice amply demonstrates this. com User, 17 years ago.

(The pictured paperback edition [see description below] is out of print, but a staple-bound PDF paper edition that contains the full text of that edition -- plus a 2013 supplement on E-book royalties written by the author-- is available from Scarf Press. ) Most publishing contracts are written by publishers' lawyers properly looking out for the publishers' interests. Publishing contracts can readily be negotiated, however, that balance the rights and interests-and meet the needs-of author and publisher alike. This book is designed to alert authors, and their agents and lawyers, to the many points that are either omitted entirely from some publishers' contracts or are written primarily from the publisher's perspective. Authors should be aware that virtually every publisher regularly revises its standard contract in many areas when asked to do so by authors or their representatives. It is only the author who doesn't know that it is perfectly acceptable to ask for changes who signs the standard contract. Most of the points noted in this book can be obtained simply by asking; others may require harder negotiation. Section headings in the book, as much as possible, have been designed to match the major sections and topics in a typical contract. This will enable the reader to compare his or her contract, topic by topic, with the comments in the book.
DART-SKRIMER
Mark Levine is a lawyer with many years of experience representing authors, small publishers and book packagers in book contract negotiations, and all that experience definitely shows in this book. But what is even more evident is that he's a fantastic writer and teacher. He takes very complex, boring legal information and makes it totally accessible.

As I read this book, line by line, page by page, I found it an absolute gold mine of information. It covers virtually any situation that could possibly come up in a publishing contract. If you could find an attorney who was willing to give you this much information in person, which is highly unlikely, it would cost you a fortune. That makes this book an incredible bargain that no author can afford to be without, whether contracting your first book or your fiftieth.

Even if you have an agent or can afford to hire a top literary attorney to help you look over your publishing contract, you still need to understand what's in that contract yourself. Knowledge is power--and money--when it comes to contracts. Agents and lawyers aren't infallible. And they can't know, if you the client don't know yourself, what sorts of rights that you as a unique individual absolutely would not want to sign away. For example, the rights to your pen name, ownership of your characters if you are writing a series, or making sure it is spelled out in your contract what "out of print" means for purposes of getting back your rights to a book that a publisher is no longer making any effort to sell.

If you only buy one book on literary contracts, make it this one. It's an essential addition to your reference shelf.
Geny
If you're an author seeking a traditional publishing deal you should be aware that publishing contracts are negotiable. Negotiating a Book Contract is the best book I've read on the subject. Writer Mark Levine provides a comprehensive, clear and concise overview of every element found in a publishing contract, including royalties, advances, subsidiary rights, manuscript delivery obligations, termination rights, and options. Levine highlights the most important clauses and identifies which points are easy to negotiate and which are more difficult.

The detailed `Sample Letter of Comments' is invaluable for authors to follow when requesting changes to their own contracts. The new revised 2009 edition of the book adds a section on Internet works and electronic rights. Even if you have a lawyer or literary agent representing you in your publishing negotiations, it's well worth having a copy of Negotiating A Book Contract on hand while reviewing your own contract.
Taun
Since I'm trying to work in the publishing industry, and currently hold internships with a few literary agencies, I really wanted to have a book that would help me learn more about contracts so that I feel more informed when speaking with my supervisors. I love this book, though I do have to admit I had to reread it a few times before having it sink in. I'm horrible when it comes to technical terms and facts, but this book helps. The best book so far I've found on this subject (if not the only one).
Vaua
I DID NOT RECEIVE THE COLORFUL BOOK, but I RECEIVED A PDF version of a contract of 95 PAGES in BLACK AND WHITE. I WILL KEEP IT AND....... EVERYTHING IS FIN! I wish that I had received the colorful book shown on the LEFT of this page however. If you ever have this particular book for sale, I will buy this version also!
Frei
In content, this is a superb resource. It is well organized, clearly written, and combines broad perspective with extensive detail. Highly recommended, even if some particulars (like royalty rates for e-books) are now outdated. Be careful about book format, though. Amazon pictured a book cover and I was sent a coverless printout of double-spaced text (like MS Word). All squared away without complaint, and it could be worth $25 in any format - just know what you're getting.
Zavevidi
Any newbie author who is lucky enough to go the Traditional Publishing Route NEEDS to read this book. It's just great... thorough... astute... and covers all of the bases --- many that most would-be writers have never heard of. Definitely, buy this book!
I'm a Russian Occupant
As the recent author and publisher of the very next book you should buy, [...], let me assure you that this book has what you need to walk into a book negotiation armed to the teeth. Then you can stalk out and do it all yourself, as you should.
Lots of great information for those writers interested in the publishing business.
Negotiating a Book Contract: A Guide for Authors, Agents and Lawyers ebook
Author:
Mark Levine
Category:
Writing Research & Publishing Guides
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1719 kb
FB2 size:
1686 kb
DJVU size:
1754 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Asphodel Press; Revised edition (July 30, 2009)
Pages:
160 pages
Rating:
4.8
Other formats:
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