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Phra Farang: An English Monk in Thailand ebook

by Phra Peter Pannapadipo


In "Phra Farang" (the title is Thai for foreign monk ), Phra Peter tells the story of his path to Buddhism and his early years as a monk in a genial style that is inviting even for readers with little knowledge of either Thailand or Buddhism.

In "Phra Farang" (the title is Thai for foreign monk ), Phra Peter tells the story of his path to Buddhism and his early years as a monk in a genial style that is inviting even for readers with little knowledge of either Thailand or Buddhism. The author himself had only a passing acquaintance with Thai customs, and Buddhist customs-to say nothing of Thai Buddhist customs-and had to learn many things on the job, so to speak.

Start by marking Phra Farang: An English Monk in Thailand as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

In this truly extraordinary memoir, Phra Peter Pannapadipo describes his ten-year metamorphosis into a practicing Buddhist monk, while being initiated into the intricacies of an unfamiliar Southeast Asian culture. Phra Peter tells his story with compassion, humour and unflinching honesty. It's the story of a 'Phra Farang' - a foreign monk - living and practicing his faith in an exotic and intriguing land. Tietoja kirjoittajasta.

item 2 "AS NEW" Phra Farang: An English Monk in Thailand, Pannapadipo, Phra Peter, Book -"AS NEW" Phra Farang . Got the book for my daughter who will travel to Thailand soon so gad a quick read and could not put it down. Very interesting book.

item 2 "AS NEW" Phra Farang: An English Monk in Thailand, Pannapadipo, Phra Peter, Book -"AS NEW" Phra Farang: An English Monk in Thailand, Pannapadipo, Phra Peter, Book. item 3 Phra farang by Phra Pannapadipo (Paperback, softback) FREE Shipping, Save £s -Phra farang by Phra Pannapadipo (Paperback, softback) FREE Shipping, Save £s. £. 2. Verified purchase: Yes Condition: Pre-owned.

Both: 2005, London, Arrow Books. Published: 20 September 2007. by Equinox Publishing. in Fieldwork in Religion. Fieldwork in Religion, Volume 2; doi:10.

Thailand by Pannapadipo Phra. July 29, 2010 History.

Phra farang : an English monk in Thailand by Pannapadipo Phra. Phra farang : an English monk in Thailand. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Phra farang : an English monk in Thailand from your list? Phra farang : an English monk in Thailand. Phra Peter Pannapadipo, Pannapadipo.

These monks will continue on a variety of different paths, many continuing their education .

These monks will continue on a variety of different paths, many continuing their education, others becoming laypeople, and some going on to teach English to others. Note: This photo won 3rd Place in the Global Tides photo contest. The last book, a workbook, is intentionally simplified, but pragmatic and relentless in leading the horse-excuse me, the reader-to the.

If you want to go this route, here are three options: Contact Therevadan organizations at pilgrimage sites in India and find out how to take temporary vows

If you want to go this route, here are three options: Contact Therevadan organizations at pilgrimage sites in India and find out how to take temporary vows. You might then be able to either volunteer in India or go on pilgrimage. Identify Westerner-friendly Therevadan monasteries in Thailand and see what experience they have and what programs they offer.

PHRA FARANG: An English Monk in Thailand. LITTLE ANGELS: Life as a Novice Monk in Thailand. Pannapadipo's interest in Buddhism began on a visit to Thailand and came to Efruition when he returned there to be ordained as a Buddhist monk. By Phra Peter Pannapadipo. This dilemma led him to leave the monastery and set up the Students Education Trust for novice monks who want to continue their education.

Book DescriptionnPhra Farang tells the story of Peter Robinson, a successful businessman, who at forty five, gave up his comfortable life in London to ordain as a Buddhist monk in Bangkok. But the new path he had chosen was not always as easy or as straightforward as he hoped it would be.
Andriodtargeted
I really liked this book. It tells the story of a western man who ordains as a Theravadan Buddhist monk in Thailand. It is filled with anecdotes that illuminate many aspects of Buddhist practice and thai Buddhism in particular. It also reveals the Thai cultural beliefs and superstitions that have merged with Buddhism there, and the authors thoughtful reflection thereupon. It is well written and most importantly, I believe him. He paints a vivid and convincing picture of his experiences as a monk; something that not too many westerners have been through, at least compared to the millions of Asians that must have ordained over the last 25 centuries. I recommend this book if you're interested in Buddhism, Thailand, or possibly ordaining as a monk yourself. Time well spent.
Hugighma
I loved this book. I read it during my visit to Thailand and it made my trip even better then it was. Author explains the Buddhism and what does it mean to be a monk in the Thailand. It helps to understand many things that you see in Thailand and make you more aware of the importance of Buddhism in Thais lives. On top of that book is very well-written and full of humor.
Whitebinder
Enjoyable read. Thought provoking with good insight into Buddhism and life in Thailand.
A must before your trip to Southeast Asia as you will enjoy and understand the culture.
nadness
Read this online after picking up a hard copy of Little Angels, even better. Both give great insight into the beiliefs, rules and personal stories of the monks and novices.
Nikok
very enjoyable book
Daigrel
(Note: This review is based on the paperback edition.)

For most of his life, Peter Robinson was a businessman in England, and in this vocation he saw a certain amount of success. Enough, anyway, that he could wear Armani suits, drive stylish cars, and stay up all night partying. But he began to question the point of this lifestyle, and after taking classes at a Thai Buddhist monastery in London, he decided to ordain as a monk in Thailand. Thus, at forty years old, he moved to Thailand, where he shaved his head, took the name Peter Pannapadipo, and began wearing the orange robes of a Thai Buddhist monk.

In "Phra Farang" (the title is Thai for “foreign monk”), Phra Peter tells the story of his path to Buddhism and his early years as a monk in a genial style that is inviting even for readers with little knowledge of either Thailand or Buddhism. The author himself had only a passing acquaintance with Thai customs, and Buddhist customs—to say nothing of Thai Buddhist customs—and had to learn many things “on the job,” so to speak. He does not spare himself in describing the embarrassments he experienced during this learning process, and this openness is part of what makes him such a engaging narrator. Equally attractive is his lack of hostility towards other believers, other schools of Buddhism, and the inevitable obnoxious tourists. He periodically overflows with praise of the dharma (Buddhist teaching), but these outbursts do not feel like altar calls; rather, they are so clearly the words of a person taking joy in his faith that they make him all the more likeable.

It would be easy, at a quick glance, to pass off this memoir as a bit light or superficial, but to do so would be to miss the careful line the writing treads. True, "Phra Farang" is not a how-to guide, a systematic exposition of the teachings of Buddhism, or a handbook of Thai culture, but Phra Peter has rightly judged that there are other books covering those topics. This book is about his life as a monk, which he describes with gusto, including Buddhist and Thai-culture pointers exactly and only when needed. This gives the story touches of an unfamiliar world while not dampening its pace or focus.

In fact, Phra Peter has achieved something rather remarkable. His memoir will be of interest to Western Buddhists because it reveals a side of Buddhist life and practice that many will not have experienced, but it never requires specialist knowledge to be understood. And he is such a personable narrator with such an interesting story that readers who have never learned a thing about the Middle Way can enjoy it just as well. A book so many can appreciate is unusual, and this one is a delight.

~
DART-SKRIMER
Be not led by the authority of religious texts, not by the delight in speculative opinions, nor by seeming possibilities, not by the idea: 'this is our teacher'

Who is whispering midlife crises when a successful British businessman of forty is turning into a Buddhist monk in Thailand?

No that would me much too easy and would do short to Peters honest account of his life as a Buddhist monk. Alto he does not tell us much about his personal reasons to become a monk. For the first half of the book this kept me puzzled. Therefore the first two hundred pages of his book were just another interesting read where I was not personally involved.

This changes after chapter nineteen where he begins to express his doubts. Doubts about his personal motives, doubts about the Thai way of Buddhism, doubts about how far his experience and experiments with meditation should go. Much to far I should say, when it leads to meditation in the still warm ovens of a crematorium.

During my short stay at a forest monastery in Thailand I also saw some examples of this focus on death. In the temple were we meditated there always was a skeleton on display with next to it a photo of a young woman and a fetus in alcohol. I think there must be better ways to realize that we are not above aging, alto taking it at heart is for sure not an easy thing. Ways much more according to the path of the middle, which for me is a very central thought in the Buddhist teachings.

Actually I was relieved to read that Peter started a charity organization to help Thai students – www.thaistudentcharity.org – After being a monk for ten years the success of this organization even leads to Peter disrobing, cease being a monk.

Thereby showing an essential understanding of Buddhism, which is about leading a good life, in whatever form this may take.

So a good read, especially the second half, about an interesting decade as monk. I am interested in the next decade.

“Yes, Kālāmas, it is proper that your have doubt, that you have perplexity, for a doubt has arisen in a matter which is doubtful. Now, look you Kālāmas, do not be led by reports, or traditions, or hearsay. Be not led by the authority of religious texts, not by the delight in speculative opinions, nor by seeming possibilities, not by the idea: 'this is our teacher'. But, O Kālāmas, when you know for yourself that certain things are unwholesome, and wrong, and bad, then give them up... And when you know for yourself that certain things are wholesome and good, then accept them and follow them.”
Gautama Buddha
Phra Farang: An English Monk in Thailand ebook
Author:
Phra Peter Pannapadipo
Category:
Buddhism
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1207 kb
FB2 size:
1841 kb
DJVU size:
1119 kb
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Publisher:
ARROW (RAND); New Ed edition (2005)
Pages:
384 pages
Rating:
4.6
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